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French Bulldogs


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How Much Do French Bulldogs Weigh? ...
How Much Do French Bulldogs Weigh? Includes Chart!

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Consider that there are many in rescue. a rescue that specializes in Frenchies and pugs may go a long way in educating you if its actually the right breed for you, and with a dog who is already older than a puppy, you will know if they inherited anything you need to watch out for. The breed is not for everyone - best research and maybe even consider fostering before you have one permanetly before you decide if its the right breed for you

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Contrary to what people believe about bulldogs being couch potatoes, French bulldogs are more energetic than other bulldog breeds.

 

Like all bulldogs they have breathing issues and can get worse when older. One thing I've heard about bulldogs is that if they've some heavy wrinkles on their face, you gotta clean between their wrinkles because dirt/food can get between them and after awhile it can smell.

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We did a house sit for people who had a bulldog and a lab. Lovely dogs. The bulldog indeed has breathing issues, they all do, but they also fart a lot! I mean a lot. So the owners fed both dogs plain yogurt mixed in their kibble which really helped with the gas. Keep that in mind. It is a bulldog thing!

 

They are nice dogs, honestly! Very friendly and smart. But dont buy one, adopt one.

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Health issues are pretty inherent when it comes to 200+ years of extreme inbreeding, particularly when it comes to intentionally breeding objectively ****ty and incredibly inhumane brachycephalic characteristics. French Bulldogs will live an entire lifetime not breathing properly, struggling with hyperkeratosis, and more likely than not requiring soft palate surgery just to be a functioning dog. But at least they're cute. ^_^

 

I don't get on my pedestal for all pure breeding. Adopt when and where ever possible, but I understand if you've got a herd of goats you need a livestock guardian dog for or if you need a bomb sniffer. But taking a rubber mallet to a dog's snout just so you can say you've got a cutie patootie destroys any mutual benefit and for no working reason. Please reconsider.

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Please don't buy one!!! You would be contributing to yet more irresponsible breeding and suffering of these poor little creatures. I work in a veterinary hospital and day in, day out we see Frenchies who either can't breathe properly, have awful skin problems or have broken a leg. Pugs and English Bulldogs come in for breathing problems and Shar Peis have to have surgery in order to see properly (and almost every one that comes in exhibits aggression). Please avoid all these and do not get a flat-faced dog. Preferably get one from a shelter; there are thousands of perfectly lovely dogs languishing in dog prison through no fault of their own.

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Wow, there are some uneducated responses about breeders in general. The “adopt don’t shop” is BS. For one, I 110% agree on not supporting “designer dogs” like French Bulldogs. Majority of those “breeders” are either Puppy Mill sting operations or a backyard breeder trying to make quick cash and doesn’t care about the health and long life of their dogs

 

But for other purebreds like working dogs? Reputable breeders screen their dogs and puppies through a series of medical tests along with vaccines. The medical care and delivery is the reason why dogs from breeders are expensive - they should not be hiding those results from buyers for any reason. Responsible breeders interview owners to see if their pup is going to a good family that meets their needs before selling. They will also have contracts that state they will take back their pup instead of having them surrendered to a shelter if the family has come across a circumstance and cannot care for the dog.

 

Reputable Breeders are not the problem. Irresponsible dog breeding AND ownership contributed to shelters.

 

I love my purebred Pembroke welsh corgi. He’s 7 years old who came from a very loving family and are members of the national breed club (PWCC). No health issues, has completed advance dog training courses, and is still very active. We go on 3-5 mile hikes on beaches and the mountains. I am going to the same breeder for another pup in a few years because of the temperament and health of my current dog are excellent.

 

 

There’s nothing wrong with getting a dog from either a shelter or a reliable breeder. Just do your research well.

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Thinking about getting a French Bulldog. Is there anything I should know before I buy one? Are they high maintenance? Health issues?

 

My step daughter's mom breeds French and English bulldogs... she is NOT a puppy mill, not all breeders are, this is why one must do their research first. I have been to her ranch multiple times to visit SD and her dogs are some of the most spoiled and well cared for dogs I have ever met.

 

I absolutely adore Frenchies! Great apartment dogs as they are relatively low energy and not very big and all the ones I have met have sweet personalities... that said, they are also often very stubborn and may not always be the sharpest pencil in the box. They could have breathing issues, issues with swallowing, problems with their eyes, other digestive issues so do a ton of research to find a reputable breeder!

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Great apartment dogs as they are relatively low energy and not very big and all the ones I have met have sweet personalities... that said, they are also often very stubborn and may not always be the sharpest pencil in the box.

 

 

Describes my personality very well that's why I want one. Not worried about the farting or other things I can cope with that. I'm worried about vet bills and the dog needing regular surgery for it's entire life though, do they really need a lot upkeep? And pure breeds are very expensive here. I am concerned about buying a dog that will be in pain it's whole life due to inbreeding. I want to make a ethical choice. What other dogs should I consider?

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Describes my personality very well that's why I want one. Not worried about the farting or other things I can cope with that. I'm worried about vet bills and the dog needing regular surgery for it's entire life though, do they really need a lot upkeep? And pure breeds are very expensive here. I am concerned about buying a dog that will be in pain it's whole life due to inbreeding. I want to make a ethical choice. What other dogs should I consider?
It's really about what the dog has to cope with. The reality is that all the snorting, snoring, and farting aren't quirks. These are symptoms of genuine anatomical defects being intentionally bred into the dog at the expense of its own quality of life. For instance, they're not "low energy" because that's just their personality. They quite literally struggle to take in a fraction of the oxygen dogs not intentionally bred with extreme brachycephalic properties take in. Their farting isn't just an "Oh, you!" moment. They legit can't breathe properly through their nose, so they swallow too much air when they eat. If you've had an actual gassy stomach, you know it's not fun. Imagine living a lifetime of it.

 

These are all things we unfortunately tend to think are cute, and without stopping to really think about it, I suppose that's fair enough. But literally struggling to breathe and having a gassy stomach for an entire lifetime sounds like an absolutely horrible existence to me. Yes, you get all kinds of Frenchies who look perfectly happy. For all I know, they really are as happy as they can be not ever having known what it is to be an actual dog. It's not an excuse to perpetuate inhumane practices, though. You can make a dog just as happy, and s/he you, without smashing its face in.

 

Will it be severely inbred? Yes, as is inherent and necessary in designer breeds. Working pure breeds are inbred as well, but they're generally afforded much more genetic diversity as buyers generally haven't and aren't measuring their snouts to the centimeter or requiring they sound asthmatic. Simply for it to live, you'll most likely have to put thousands into surgery on its elongated soft palate. And if not for medical necessity, then absolutely for whatever quality of life you can redeem for it. You'll have to maintain its skin folds. You'll have to actively monitor and train its feedings so that it doesn't eat too quickly.

 

For the record, I tend to regard designer breeds and especially brachycephalic breeds as a separate matter from the general practice. I have opinions, but insofar as anatomically healthy, working breeds go, there's at least an understandable enough argument. There's nothing unethical about liking Frenchies or Pugs. I've met many who were adorable. Certainly no reason to hate the dogs. And you're not at all a bad person for coming here expressing interest in Frenchies. However, what is unethical is monetarily supporting the industry producing them. I frankly don't care if it's Puppy Disney World. There is no such thing as an ethical French Bulldog breeder.

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If you have a lot of money for vet bills or to pay for pet health insurance then by all means get this breed of dog if you wish.

 

They are a mixed bag though health wise. I know of one that lived to be 12 years old and others that died suddenly at 3 years old. They are a high maintenance dog for sure so if you aren't an experienced dog owner perhaps you should consider a more durable breed first. Special diets, frequent vet visits and frankly not the smartest breed around makes this choice problematic.

 

It is good you are asking questions first and not just falling in love with some puppy and bringing home and THEN worrying about the consequences. I don't know how many breeders you have dealt with but they are a mixed bag too.

 

What is it about this breed that make you want to have one join your family? What are your expectations? Like are you wanting to go to the dog park and play ball or go for long walks with your dog? Figure out what your lifestyle is and get a dog that matches that very well and you both will be happy and healthy. For example I live on property, hike in the mountains, want a smart and athletic dog that can keep up with me that is tough and durable so I have an Australian shepherd.

 

Take your time and be sure you know what you are getting into no matter what dog you end up bringing home.

 

Lost

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First thing is consider your lifestyle. Meaning are you an active person, someone who goes jogging every day, rain or shine, or more of a home body. Do you live in a large space, big yard, or small apartment or condo?

 

In terms of where you live, it will help you sort out what size of a dog you can get. Another thing to consider if you live in an apartment, for example, is noise. You do not want to buy a breed of dog prone to barking, howling, or high anxiety and vocal or you'll get evicted.

 

If you are physically active, you need to look for a dog who can keep up. If you are not, you will need to look for a breed that's more happy being a couch potato. This isn't just a breed thing either, you'll need to look for a laid back puppy in particular. The quiet guy sitting in the corner, not the bold hyper one who will run right up to you. Hyper puppy will grow into a hyper adult dog that requires a lot of exercise, training, and attention. Keep that in mind. So it's not just picking the right breed, but also picking the right temperament of that particular pup to suit your own energy levels.

 

Other considerations - climate where you live, hot or cold. Fur length and shedding and fur maintenance. Grooming costs can add up quickly if you get a dog with high maintenance fur, unless you get very good at doing it yourself and will dedicate that kind of time to that. Again, something to think about seriously - how much work do you honestly want to put into that before it gets to be too much or you start neglecting things.

 

Health of course, is important if you don't want to buy your vet their new yacht. Less popular breeds tend to be healthier as there is less pressure to produce, thus inbreed, etc. Dog's conformation, face, back, haunches, other issues - you can look all that up as you narrow down your breed selections by size, energy levels, vocal tendencies, fur type, etc. Most breed descriptions out there will tell you about what problems the breed is prone to and how prevalent those issues are within the breed. Some breeds tend to be fairly healthy.

 

Basically, once you delve into all the above details, you'll narrow things down to just a handful or even just a few breeds that really fit you, your lifestyle, and you wallet correctly.

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Wow, there are some uneducated responses about breeders in general.

 

I love my purebred Pembroke welsh corgi.

 

That's what I was thinking...I see them at our dog park when they do a meet-up...at least 30 frenchies all running around and playing! So cute!!!

 

I have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi too!!! I love her to inifinity. She's my baby. But I would only recommend if you can live with the barking, shedding, and ridiculously out-smart you behavior. So easy to train though. Had her house-broken in 2 weeks. Our reccue took close to 5/6 months to be fully housebroken.

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