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Thread: Thinking about resigning

  1. #21
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    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    I agree with you actually but I've also worked at less than stellar companies so I'm not exactly naive when it comes to working for others. It's important to have a good attitude but when an environment is out of your (hypothetical 'your') hands, it's best to acknowledge it, accept it and work towards a better future. Continuing to hit your (again, hypothetical) head against a brick wall or in a situation that is difficult to change is not going to help anyone. His agitation alone is not healthy to the company or to himself. Not everyone is resilient enough or humble enough to backtrack on their wrongs and not everyone in the company will be willing to support him. Face it head on and prepare for the future in ways that are calculated for better returns.
    I don't relate to how what you wrote responds to what I wrote. I never suggested you were naive. My advice is as I wrote above. I disagreed with the approach you suggested he take. Your response here doesn't seem related to the approach I wrote about.

  2. #22
    Platinum Member DancingFool's Avatar
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    No company is ever going to give some exhaustive job description. Even if they give you one, it's more of a guiding outline of your job, not detailed day to day duties. You are clinging onto paperwork, that ultimately doesn't matter. Your job is actually learn and do what's asked of you and then ask what more you can do.

    If you really want to treat this job as a learning experience for yourself, then let your emotions cool off and actually figure out why your perception of what you have done and the company's perception of what you have done are so off. Start asking HR some specific questions like what you can do better to earn that raise. What did they see as deficient in your performance. Yes, HR, because they already made it clear that the boss doesn't want to deal with that directly himself. Let HR be the go between. Open up the conversation asking for constructive criticism from them and actually listen very careful and without getting defensive on what they tell you. The more earnest you are in seeking that constructive feedback, the more likely you are going to gain useful information (even if not pleasant to hear) that will allow you to grow.

  3. #23
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I don't relate to how what you wrote responds to what I wrote. I never suggested you were naive. My advice is as I wrote above. I disagreed with the approach you suggested he take. Your response here doesn't seem related to the approach I wrote about.
    I edited it to include a few more points.

  4. #24
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    It sounds like you believe you were guaranteed a raise after six months but that's apparently not the case. Who told you that you were guaranteed a raise?

    Also, how do you know who got raises and how much they were? That shouldn't be discussed. And I hope you haven't discussed your disappointment at not getting a raise with any of your coworkers.

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  6. #25
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    Originally Posted by DancingFool
    No company is ever going to give some exhaustive job description. Even if they give you one, it's more of a guiding outline of your job, not detailed day to day duties. You are clinging onto paperwork, that ultimately doesn't matter. Your job is actually learn and do what's asked of you and then ask what more you can do.

    If you really want to treat this job as a learning experience for yourself, then let your emotions cool off and actually figure out why your perception of what you have done and the company's perception of what you have done are so off. Start asking HR some specific questions like what you can do better to earn that raise. What did they see as deficient in your performance. Yes, HR, because they already made it clear that the boss doesn't want to deal with that directly himself. Let HR be the go between. Open up the conversation asking for constructive criticism from them and actually listen very careful and without getting defensive on what they tell you. The more earnest you are in seeking that constructive feedback, the more likely you are going to gain useful information (even if not pleasant to hear) that will allow you to grow.
    Totally agree with this.

  7. #26
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    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    I agree with you actually but I've also worked at less than stellar companies so I'm not exactly naive when it comes to working for others. It's important to have a good attitude but when an environment is out of your (hypothetical 'your') hands, it's best to acknowledge it, accept it and work towards a better future. Continuing to hit your (again, hypothetical) head against a brick wall or in a situation that is difficult to change is not going to help anyone. His agitation alone is not healthy to the company or to himself. Not everyone is resilient enough or humble enough to backtrack on their wrongs and not everyone in the company will be willing to support him. Face it head on and prepare for the future in ways that are calculated for better returns.

    My suggestion is to clarify the job description issue where clarification was lacking in the first place. If he has a a specific skill set and is hired for a specific purpose, both parties (employer and candidate/employee) should be aware. I'm not suggesting in any way rigidity or being difficult to work with but there should be more clarity at the start between both parties. The rest is really up to the person on whether he/she wants to grow. Most leaders or individuals in managerial positions take on a lot more than what their JDs list. It just comes with the territory. Even if he is his own boss his skills in learning to clarify job descriptions and expectations are useful when he's managing his own employees.
    I agree to a minor extent. I would not take this approach on an interview. I would ask broad questions and only if he could not get the information from the description or the website/inside info. Show a can do/team player attitude because getting into the weeds too much on an interview is inconsistent with a team player attitude. This time around when I did my job search I had to be very specific about timing and telework because of child care responsibilities (which they were aware of and the part time program I interviewed for was particularly suited to moms like me)- it would have been a waste of their time if in reality they needed me in the office 5 days a week which I likely could not make happen.

    If there is something the interviewee cannot do - meaning just lacks the skills (like I couldn't drive as part of my work responsibilities) or needs a particular accommodation that should be stated at the outset. If I had to choose between two candidates where one asked for specific clarification of job duties (especially if I got even an inkling of "I don't want to do ___ that is beneath me") and the other asked a broad based question and then focused on how she could contribute to the company it would be a no brainer who I'd choose.

  8. #27
    Originally Posted by Qwerty55
    I also have to add I'm the only probationaty employee who didn't get a salary increase. That's when I started to get upset and realized all of them have a systematic job description while mine didn't that's why I performed poorly, because he keeps giving me new tasks that aren't on my job offer and I'm unfamiliar with.
    There is always a reason. Ask for feedback.

  9. #28
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I agree to a minor extent. I would not take this approach on an interview. I would ask broad questions and only if he could not get the information from the description or the website/inside info. Show a can do/team player attitude because getting into the weeds too much on an interview is inconsistent with a team player attitude. This time around when I did my job search I had to be very specific about timing and telework because of child care responsibilities (which they were aware of and the part time program I interviewed for was particularly suited to moms like me)- it would have been a waste of their time if in reality they needed me in the office 5 days a week which I likely could not make happen.

    If there is something the interviewee cannot do - meaning just lacks the skills (like I couldn't drive as part of my work responsibilities) or needs a particular accommodation that should be stated at the outset. If I had to choose between two candidates where one asked for specific clarification of job duties (especially if I got even an inkling of "I don't want to do ___ that is beneath me") and the other asked a broad based question and then focused on how she could contribute to the company it would be a no brainer who I'd choose.
    Good points. And I'd have the same approach as you. I did mention however that I'm not promoting rigidity. I just think everyone should be on the same page. You're still commenting on the rigidity aspect with your examples which we're both agreeing is not conducive to a team player attitude/atmosphere.

  10. #29
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    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    Good points. And I'd have the same approach as you. I did mention however that I'm not promoting rigidity. I just think everyone should be on the same page. You're still commenting on the rigidity aspect with your examples which we're both agreeing is not conducive to a team player attitude/atmosphere.
    Yes. I would find your approach to an interview too rigid and the interviewee getting in his own way. I think being on the same page in that situation means that the interviewee should know what the company does, his job description, and if needed his general working hours and most of all how he can be an asset to and contribute to the company in whatever way possible. He has to sell himself particularly in this job market. Asking to be "on the same page" with respect to what would be outside his job description -again, especially if there was even a whiff of "I want to make sure I won't be doing anything beneath my stature" - to me should not be the priority for someone who needs a job that is relevant to his career or future goals.

  11. #30
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    Yes. I would find your approach to an interview too rigid and the interviewee getting in his own way. I think being on the same page in that situation means that the interviewee should know what the company does, his job description, and if needed his general working hours and most of all how he can be an asset to and contribute to the company in whatever way possible. He has to sell himself particularly in this job market. Asking to be "on the same page" with respect to what would be outside his job description -again, especially if there was even a whiff of "I want to make sure I won't be doing anything beneath my stature" - to me should not be the priority for someone who needs a job that is relevant to his career or future goals.
    I understand where you're coming from but I think you're still stuck in the negative mindset or interpretation of what I'm trying to convey. I'm in no way suggesting that anyone behave like parts of their job are beneath them. I already addressed this in my first post about how the OP's boss may have sensed some push back. It's common knowledge that acting like a snob is not going to get anyone anywhere. I also think it's a bit naive to believe that a company will behave in an employee's best interests. I'm only suggesting that he cover his bases and take care of his best interests also. There's a balance.

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