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Would Prozac help with my social constipation?


_AC_
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It would be best to consult your doctor.

 

High blood pressure medicines, such as atenolol, can be prescribed for social anxiety.

 

Atenolol may be useful for discrete forms of social phobia such as performance anxiety.

 

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I would avoid prozac unless you have deep emotional distress, such as depression.

 

Atenolol has very few side effects except for weight gain as it slows down fat metabolism.

 

You can discuss this with your MD/DO as a suggestion for treatment.

 

Hugs, Rose

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It would be best to consult your doctor.

 

High blood pressure medicines, such as atenolol, can be prescribed for social anxiety.

 

 

 

link removed

 

I would avoid prozac unless you have deep emotional distress, such as depression.

 

Atenolol has very few side effects except for weight gain as it slows down fat metabolism.

 

You can discuss this with your MD/DO as a suggestion for treatment.

 

Hugs, Rose

 

 

Beta-blockers such as atenolol, propranolol, metoprolol...are all good. Performers, (I know a pianist) are prescribed beta-blocker drugs for performance anxiety. These drugs block some of the adrenaline to your heart. Adrenaline is the substance that is released in times of stress-causing your heart to beat rapidly.

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Beta blockers only seem to reduce the physical symptoms of anxiety, and they don't always work with very anxiety producing situations.

 

As far as the anxiety that you're experiencing mentally is concerned, it doesn't do a damned thing, so you'll still find it hard to speak and everything when you're really shy, it's just that your heart racing, sweating and shaking shouldn't be as bad.

 

Seriously, go to the doctors, tell him you have social anxiety and depression and you'd like to give meds and therapy a try. In therapy you'll be doing CBT which involves going into anxiety producing situations, and if you find a med that works which will lessen your anxiety considerably, it makes you able to handle doing these exercises.

 

I don't know what things are like in your country, but over here in Britain you don't have to do the therapy as well, you can just stick with the meds if that is what you desire. And if this is what you want to do and your doctor doesn't agree, just make an appointment with a different one.

 

Good luck, dude. I know how hard it is.

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The hope is that it would help me forget about my depression and nervousness (lack of verbal connection w/ others) and allow me to be "myself".

 

That's just the trouble. It can help you "forget" about your issues, sure. But it doesn't help you actually deal with them. So, if you're going to get on any kind of medication, I can't recommend enough you supplement it with therapy and a commitment to growing mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. And also, try to take the viewpoint that the medication will be temporary, to help you get out of the current slump you're in, but that it won't be a lifelong answer for you.

 

And definitely consult with a doctor, first, preferably a pyschiatrist who is better-versed at prescribing the most appropriate medication for you.

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Why can't medication be a lifelong answer?

 

Btw, some people have social anxiety because of a chemical imbalance in the brain, no amount of therapy is really going to get rid of it, and the only thing they're going to be able to rely on for the rest of their lives is medication.

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First of all, antidepressants are not addictive in the physical sense. You mention that you feel depressed. This can easily be the result of having social phobia or anxiety. There are very good treatments for that, esp. cognitive therapy offers great tools to learn to cope and behave naturally in social situations (without feeling suffocated and anxious even when THINKING about meeting new people).

 

And like Scout says, medication might take edges off, but never makes you 'forget'. It just makes the experience of anxiety and depression less, but often also flattens other (positive) emotions. For me, medication is a last resort. I am currently on effexor for GAD (general anxiety disorder) and depression.

 

Definitely consult a doctor. I don't know what you were planning, these are of course prescription meds, but NEVER order this kind of stuff online. You never know what you will get.

 

Ilse

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Btw, some people have social anxiety because of a chemical imbalance in the brain, no amount of therapy is really going to get rid of it, and the only thing they're going to be able to rely on for the rest of their lives is medication.

 

The jury is still out on that one. I've heard that there isn't definitive proof that chemical imbalances exists. Although, I tend to believe they do. But I know for sure there is no proof that chemical imbalances are a lifelong condition that can only be treated with medicine. You'd have to observe every person who supposedly has a chemical imbalance for the rest of their life before you could conclude with such a statement.

 

Plus, if chemical imbalances do exist, isn't it possible that some are created by diet, lack of exercise, etc.? And if so, wouldn't that indicate there are more holistic and non-synthetic ways to treat a chemical imbalance?

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The jury is still out on that one. I've heard that there isn't definitive proof that chemical imbalances exists. Although, I tend to believe they do. But I know for sure there is no proof that chemical imbalances are a lifelong condition that can only be treated with medicine. You'd have to observe every person who supposedly has a chemical imbalance for the rest of their life before you could conclude with such a statement.

 

Yeah but, it seems very likely that a chemical imbalance is with you for life, if you've already had it for the whole of your life. It does really seem like it's something that you're born with because I can't really imagine anything else making it that way, apart for serious long term drug abuse.

 

Plus, if chemical imbalances do exist, isn't it possible that some are created by diet, lack of exercise, etc.? And if so, wouldn't that indicate there are more holistic and non-synthetic ways to treat a chemical imbalance?

 

I seriously doubt it, and even if there was, what's wrong with taking medication instead? It seems like a lot less hassle than having to change your diet around or having to exersise everyday.

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I seriously doubt it, and even if there was, what's wrong with taking medication instead? It seems like a lot less hassle than having to change your diet around or having to exersise everyday.

 

Lol, that's just the problem (in my opinion) with much of society. We all want the "quick fix." Well, dealing with anxieties and emotional problems involves a lot more work than just popping a pill if you want to truly achieve peace of mind. Meds can lose their effectiveness over time, plus they don't necessarily make you happy, just make you not care. Often, that is.

 

A lot of people don't understand that a diet based on processsed, chemical-laden, sugary ingredients can actually effect our emotions. They can make us feel completely without energy, and crave even more of these ingredients. You say medication is a simpler way of dealing with an imbalance than proper diet and exercise, but I disagree. Over time, medication can become expensive, and if you're not eating right or exercising, you can develop some really complicated physical problems that are even more expensive to treat. So, what may seem simpler at first can often trigger a lot more complexity.

 

In my opinion, depression is on the rise because so many of us are leading meaningless lives. We get up, go to work where we glue ourselves to a computer, go to happy hour to toss back a few drinks to numb the frustration and boredom, then veg out in front of the boob tube. In the meantime, precious moments are slipping by while we're living like zombies. And we're being prescribed "happy pills" to make it all go away, instead of getting off our tails and actually making some attempts to lead a more authentic life.

 

Of course, there are some people with true pyschosises (sp?) and serious emotional disorders that medication can definitely alleviate.

 

But I am concerned with the growing belief that it's ok to treat almost all forms of depression and anxiety with medication. This original poster has fears of socializing with others. I think a lot of us have that fear. The key is to become a more interesting person yourself, so that others are interested in being and talking with you. In my opinion, anyway.

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Lol, that's just the problem (in my opinion) with much of society. We all want the "quick fix." Well, dealing with anxieties and emotional problems involves a lot more work than just popping a pill if you want to truly achieve peace of mind. Meds can lose their effectiveness over time, plus they don't necessarily make you happy, just make you not care. Often, that is.

 

I don't see what's wrong with a quick fix, I mean, it's not as good as a permenent fix but surely it's still a good thing isn't it? I don't think that all meds are only temporary fixes anyway. And if your meds do end up losing effectiveness, which they may not, you could try something else.

 

A lot of people don't understand that a diet based on processsed, chemical-laden, sugary ingredients can actually effect our emotions. They can make us feel completely without energy, and crave even more of these ingredients. You say medication is a simpler way of dealing with an imbalance than proper diet and exercise, but I disagree. Over time, medication can become expensive, and if you're not eating right or exercising, you can develop some really complicated physical problems that are even more expensive to treat. So, what may seem simpler at first can often trigger a lot more complexity.

 

Well, because I'm not working my medication is free, I already workout, and if it does make a difference to my social anxiety and depression, it's so small that it it isn't really noticeable. As for changing my diet, I honestly wouldn't know what foods I should eat and which I should avoid, and there's no way I'd be down for eating boring unappetising foods for the rest of my life, and having to go without the food that I love, I'd only do that as a last resort.

 

In my opinion, depression is on the rise because so many of us are leading meaningless lives. We get up, go to work where we glue ourselves to a computer, go to happy hour to toss back a few drinks to numb the frustration and boredom, then veg out in front of the boob tube. In the meantime, precious moments are slipping by while we're living like zombies. And we're being prescribed "happy pills" to make it all go away, instead of getting off our tails and actually making some attempts to lead a more authentic life.

 

Maybe, maybe not. But I don't think it's like that for all of us, I think some of us genuinley do enjoy watching TV, spending time on the net, etc instead of doing outdoor pursuits. And for some people it's hard having a life, it's hard enjoying outdoor pursuits and making friends to spend time with if you suffer from depression and social anxiety. Some of us aren't even able to get girlfriends/boyfriends. Apart from the from the fact that depression and anxiety doesn't feel nice, this is exactly why we want to fix our depression and anxiety, so we can have a life, and enjoy the things it has to offer.

 

Of course, there are some people with true pyschosises (sp?) and serious emotional disorders that medication can definitely alleviate.

 

Yes, and it includes depression and anxiety.

 

But I am concerned with the growing belief that it's ok to treat almost all forms of depression and anxiety with medication. This original poster has fears of socializing with others. I think a lot of us have that fear. The key is to become a more interesting person yourself, so that others are interested in being and talking with you. In my opinion, anyway.

 

Seriously, I really don't think it's as simple as becoming a more interesting person yourself. I mean, there's plenty of uninteresting people who don't suffer from depression and/or anxiety.

 

All in all, it IS okay to treat people with medication, it's not causing any harm. there may be side effects, but it's not like they're perment and the positives certainly outweigh the negatives.

 

I don't see what's wrong with just giving a patient meds and thats it, if that's what he wants. If they help, that's a good thing, if they don't, they don't.

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_AC_ and anyone else who might be interested in reading this, here is a current thread about a poster who is quitting Zoloft, and why.

 

 

 

The thread is getting a lot of interesting feedback from folks who missed having "feelings" while they were on meds. There is also an insightful post on how diet can also cause depression and certain foods might be able to actually treat depression:

 

Think very carefully before you make the decision to use meds to treat your depression or social anxiety. Try to get information from as many sources as possible. The medical profession will almost always try to prescribe you something, but it's worth checking out some other alternatives, as well.

 

While I agree that in some cases, meds can get us over a bad spell, I still believe far too many people are on them. We're all going to experience depression and anxiety at some point in our lives. Turning to meds every time without doing any additional work on yourself and your life will make you ignore the true cause of your problems, and they will stay with you, whether you're on meds or not.

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you know, meds really aren't a quick fix at all. I was on an SSRI for a while and found that the drawbacks were almost as bad as the anxiety/depression itself.

 

side effects.... sexual dysfunction, extreme sleepiness, extreme irritablitliy, moodiness, dry mouth, diarrhea, vivid dreaming, weight gain, etc....

 

if anything, all those side effects can make you keep being depressed, regardless of the meds!

 

depending on whether or not you have a true chemical imbalance, or just a case of the "blahs" or somewhere in between, turning to meds alone probably won't help much.

 

i know people for whom meds didn't work. I asked why, and they said, "because my depression is situational, it's about where I am in my life, it's not about chemistry."

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Thanks for all of your replies...

 

If I were to decide to go the drugs route I would most definitely see a doctor and follow their recommendation on the best treatment.

 

My dad took prozac for several years, he had/has hypertension and though I have not been diagnosed - I'm pretty sure I must have it too. Now that he's older his symptoms have changed and gotten better in some ways, but he's taking lots of meds still for other reasons.

 

He used to go with my mother (even after they were married) to parties at other couples homes, and he'd end up having to use the bathroom as soon as he got there. Nervous bowels - yup, I got that too but only when I don't have time to go, which makes it worse- LOL.

 

He said he was glad to get off of the prozac, but also that it did help.

 

 

I'm not so sure that drugs are the answer for myself. I think probably the best therapy for me would be to make some friends and be able to blow off steam with them. For numerous reasons this seems impossible to me right now.

 

I'm a bit freaked out to see a doctor about this though... it all seems like such a hassle, embarrassment, and expense, not to mention the side effects.... I do want the quick fix, but that thread Scout linked to is pretty scary to me. I deal with negative emotions bad enough and I'm not sure I could function enough to maintain my life if I was having withdrawals from antidepressants.

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I agree with scout on just about everything said. I think the pharmiceutical industry is more into money than actually treating people. Sure some of the meds work, but I think a lot of them are dangerous to our well-being and I personally am saddened that people rely on meds to live their life.

 

I think a more natural lifestyle is better.

 

Right now I have anxiety problems and I get panic attack symptoms (symptoms, not actual panic), but I've managed to control them without any meds. In the past I had taken Paxil for OCD, but that went away as soon as I joined a Church and started socializing and stuff. It showed me that one the medicine was not good enough and two, socializing a lot helped, and I also think God had a say in it.

 

Lately I have distrusted mainstream medicine in general. I am going to try going to the natural route and not feed (what I think is) the corporate pharmaceutical machines.

 

But like Scout said, do research! Go ahead and talk to your doctors, but also talk to therapists, and personal counselors, and even talk to your family and friends. I'm sure you'll find something that works.

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I hear you.

 

I think when people refer to themselves as zombies is when they stop having feelings.

 

For the record though, not everyone stops having feelings on meds. I haven't, infact I do experience having more positive feelings, not having things get to me as much and just feeling better inside. A great song or a sunny day will still make me feel happy and lighten my mood.

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Don't let the links scare you, there's bad sides to everything, for example driving a car could wind you up in a crash.

 

What everyone seems to not realise, is not all meds have side effects for each individual person, and some that do the side effects can go away eventually (it's usually a few days). The most common side effects are sleepiness, not being able to get to sleep (these can be remidied by taking your meds at a different time, for example, if it makes you sleepy, take it before bed time, if it makes you awake, take it in the morning), anorgasmia, nausia, worsened depression, worsened anxiety. I wouldn't say these are things to be scared of, unless the depression or anxiety can get that bad.

 

Meds can be very benificial. Yes, you may want to tackle the real problem (that's if it's not a chemical imbalance) with therapy, but meds can still help you along the way, and make the desensitising, exposure, ect, a lot more doable, or even possible. And make life a lot more bearable until you have fixed your problem.

 

Really, I don't like the attiude that all meds are bad, you shouldn't take them, they wont help, it's just a quick fix etc, etc. Because it isn't true. I worry for people who's lives are suffering visiting doctors with this attitude.

 

Btw, glasses, laser surgery, or contacts are a quick fix. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't have them if you have sight problems.

 

And as for leading a more natural lifestyle, I think that's a load of BS to be honest.

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Meds can be very benificial. Yes, you may want to tackle the real problem (that's if it's not a chemical imbalance) with therapy, but meds can still help you along the way, and make the desensitising, exposure, ect, a lot more doable, or even possible. And make life a lot more bearable until you have fixed your problem.

 

I actually agree with you on this. There are some people whose depression and anxiety is so incredibly overwhelming and crippling, that medication can help get them in a calmer place so they can start to tackle their issues. But I stand by my belief that doctors overprescribe medication to people who actually are experiencing depression and anxiety at levels that other treatments (yes, holistic, diet, exercise, therapy) would be more effective and long-lasting in terms of their specific problems.

 

Listen, I've taken meds myself in the past, so I'm not judging anyone who does. I just think they are way overprescribed, and that patients aren't given additional information on other forms of treatment.

 

And as for leading a more natural lifestyle, I think that's a load of BS to be honest.

 

While you're certainly entitled to your opinion, I take issue with this comment for two reasons. One, it's disparaging to the poster who stated this as their opinion. You can respectfully disagree with someone without resorting to calling their opinion BS. Now, I don't think you really mean to come accross as insulting, it's obvious you care about the original poster's plight or you wouldn't be contributing to the thread, but still...there's a way to disagree that doesn't put down someone else's opinion.

 

Second, you don't back up this assertion with any real explanation. All you've said so far is that it would mean people would have to eat "boring foods." I just get the feeling you're not really educated on other, more natural ways of treating depression, so you're chalking it up as BS. If you are going to stand firmly behind an opinion, your belief will be given more merit if you can back it up with some facts. Which usually entails having to research all sides of an issue.

 

There have been many studies that indicate certain foods can effect people emotionally and physically. Many people believe "ADD" is on the rise because of all the sugary, processed foods on the market, for example.

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I think probably the best therapy for me would be to make some friends and be able to blow off steam with them. For numerous reasons this seems impossible to me right now.

 

AC, is this something you would be open to talking about with us? I can't promise we have the answers, but we are an advice site, so we'll do our best. Like you, I had social anxiety when I was younger, so it's not something I think is uncommon. You'd be surprised how many people have it, especially when they're younger and still trying to figure out their own identity, where they fit in, etc.

 

Sometimes, we put up mental barriers that stop us from doing things we're scared of. "I can't do this because of X" or "No one will like me because of Y." You'd be surprised how many things people deprive themselves of because of self-created mental roadblocks.

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I actually agree with you on this. There are some people whose depression and anxiety is so incredibly overwhelming and crippling, that medication can help get them in a calmer place so they can start to tackle their issues. But I stand by my belief that doctors overprescribe medication to people who actually are experiencing depression and anxiety at levels that other treatments (yes, holistic, diet, exercise, therapy) would be more effective and long-lasting in terms of their specific problems.

 

Listen, I've taken meds myself in the past, so I'm not judging anyone who does. I just think they are way overprescribed, and that patients aren't given additional information on other forms of treatment.

 

Okay, sorry, it just came accross as though people were just dismissing meds as being no good, and it should just be sorted by natural methods and therapy.

 

 

 

While you're certainly entitled to your opinion, I take issue with this comment for two reasons. One, it's disparaging to the poster who stated this as their opinion. You can respectfully disagree with someone without resorting to calling their opinion BS. Now, I don't think you really mean to come accross as insulting, it's obvious you care about the original poster's plight or you wouldn't be contributing to the thread, but still...there's a way to disagree that doesn't put down someone else's opinion.

 

Second, you don't back up this assertion with any real explanation. All you've said so far is that it would mean people would have to eat "boring foods." I just get the feeling you're not really educated on other, more natural ways of treating depression, so you're chalking it up as BS. If you are going to stand firmly behind an opinion, your belief will be given more merit if you can back it up with some facts. Which usually entails having to research all sides of an issue.

 

Well, I didn't mean any offense, I just really cannot see that eating more vegies and doing yoga would cure or lessen anything substantially enough for me.

 

I didn't see the point with backing up my opinion though because I said personally I think it's BS, I wasn't stating it as a fact.

 

There have been many studies that indicate certain foods can effect people emotionally and physically. Many people believe "ADD" is on the rise because of all the sugary, processed foods on the market, for example.

 

I believe you, but like I said, it's very hard to believe that all I have to do is start eating more lettauce, lay off the burgers and sit there with my legs crossed going "Ohhhhm" and it would lessen my social anxiety and depression substantialy enough. It's very hard to believe that it would be more effective than meds.

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Have you actually tried yoga yourself?

 

I do it and can definitely say that I feel better after I do it. I'm not anti-meds at all, I've been on them before myself. Just saying, I know that after 1 hour of yoga, I feel better than I did before that hour, so something is going right!

 

There is a reason that yoga has been around for as many hundreds of years as it has.

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