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" In a box not a bottle" Asperger's revealed


Seraphim
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  • 1 month later...
4 hours ago, Seraphim said:

Today 8 years ago my son was diagnosed Autistic. 

Morning Seraphim! 
 

Hope you are feeling better! I have noticed, some of the most intelligent and forward people in our society have been Autistic. A modern example is Elon Musk!

 

I once over heard someone say “There is a little bit of autism in everyone” - is that completely untrue? Could you be so subtly autistic that you would almost “not register” ? I ask this question because I think people like Einstein for example, as far as I know, he was seen as quite normal but just highly intelligent and curiously creative. But I also know he didn’t speak till very late (a lot like my son!) and people and his parents did think something might be different about him. Do you think he could have also been autistic but just kind of, flew under the radar so to speak because he was still socially functioning?

 

All the best!

 

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No, there isn’t a little Autism in everyone. It is a completely separate neuro type. Their brain is actually physically different from the brain of neurotypical people. Some structures of the brain are either bigger or smaller. How it is wired is completely different and can be different depending upon the person. And this happens incredibly early in foetal development. What they figure even in the first trimester a baby is either Autistic or Allistic . 
 

The brain and how the brain is wired is different so  how the nervous system operates with the rest of the body is different. 

In light of that because we are essentially our brain it also affects every facet of them as people and their bodies and experiences. 
 

It is like we can’t be a little bit pregnant we either are or we are not . What the issue is is some people may not be good at detecting Autistic people. And all Autistic people are different like all of us. 
 

Historical figures are difficult of course because you can’t diagnose them with accuracy. 
 

Elon, yes , I know about him being Autistic. He presents as Autistic in his movements and speech patterns and repetition of materials he wants you to understand. They can be INCREDIBLY insistent. 
 

This is more an aspect of you either are or you are not and happens in the very beginnings of development with the brain as a fetus. 

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A friend of mine has two children, both of whom have been diagnosed autistic.  The children are not the same.  His younger child has an easier time relating to people, makes friends easily and hasn't had any struggles in school or in having a social life.  His older child (son) seems to have a much more difficult time.  For example, I met up with the three of them at an event.  His daughter was about four years old at the time and happily climbed into my lap, talking cheerfully and giving me hugs.  His son, however, was not enjoying himself.  He had thought the two daughters of some friends of his dad's were going to be there but they weren't.  He kept repeating over and over "I wanted B and A to be here!" and slamming things and stomping his feet and basically wailing.  His dad calmly kept answering "They're not here, T, I'm sorry". Then he wanted his dad to buy him a cotton candy and his dad said no.  He proceeded to repeat "I want cotton candy!" over and over and his dad just kept calmly replying "No, I'm not going to get you a cotton candy".  Apparently sugar caused issues for him, and since cotton candy is all sugar he didn't feel it would be good for him.  I was really impressed with his dad.  He never lost his patience or his temper.  He stayed calm and replied in a loving way but stayed firm.  The son also didn't seem to be able to make friends.  For example, he had signed up to be one of the equipment handlers for his high school football team.  When the season was over the team, coaches and parents went out for pizza.  I saw a photo where the entire team was seated together at long benches and there was T, all by himself several feet away from the rest of the team.  Not one team member came and sat with him.  I still feel bad when I think about that, and it's been years!  I thought, couldn't ONE kid have come and sat with him?? 

The kids are now adults.  The son basically spends all his time with his dad.  The daughter has a boyfriend and a job and lives with her mom and seems to be doing well.  I do know the dad is a very devoted father so I'm happy for that.  I've known these kids since their mom was pregnant with them so I'm a bit emotionally invested.  The dad and I had a falling out (long story, not for this forum!) so I don't have any contact with them, but I hope his son is doing better and has a more fulfilling life.

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Female Autistics tend to pretend to be more social due to more pressure to mask and “ be nice”. There is less social pressure on men to be that way. I know my son masks more heavily outside our home but not so inside. Masking is not good for Autistic people at all and they should never strive to do so. The adult autistic community many many many who are also other sexual orientations and gender expressions equate ABA and forcing people to act neurotypical to be congruent with conversation therapy for gay and other gendered people. ABA and conversion were started by the same people and it is all hideous abuse. NO ONE should be forced into acting as something they are not. 
 

My son does make a few good friends but never easily. He is very very difficult to get to know as he is not chatty or forthcoming. He also prefers no form of touch at all. Some Autistics particularly females tend to be very chatty and overshare, but not always. Others are very withdrawn like male counterparts. 

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