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LoveConquersAll

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  1. Cool! I'm French πŸ™‚ Favourite places to visit would be Greece (Ithaca, to be precise), San Remo and Corsica.
  2. Hi @Danny! So this is what I'm understanding from the above (please correct me if I'm wrong) 1. She left you 2 months ago via text 2. She recently interacted with you on social media asking you fairly innocuous questions 3. You either ignore her or give her a short reply Sounds like she's giving you a valid explanation as to why she left you abruptly. Could you please clarify for context: do you know what 'bad time in her life' she was referring to? how did you come to the conclusion that she is a 'narcissist'? it seems she actually wants to talk but is struggling to let you know directly (contacting you on 'ig', opening up a little bit about the reasons for the break-up, etc.) Reading between the lines, it feels like she is giving you the green light to contact her - would this be opening a can of worms for you? If so, best to make your boundaries clear - either call her up and have a clear conversation about the state of your (non)relationship or text her to let her know gently but firmly that you have moved on. With such little context, it's very difficult to give more tailored advice. Is she really a narcissist, then and if so, is the bolded a good idea? (questions for you to ponder, you don't need to reply here).
  3. Do you have to? Emotionally mature adults with some experience behind them can navigate these delicate situations with good nature and kindness. With good will, empathy, patience and understanding on both sides, there really is no reason why you can't be friends. I don't know how old you are @Pumpkinspice2703, but as a woman in my late 40s I'd have no issues maintaining (and consolidating, even) those precious friendship bonds, which can be just as meaningful as a relationship. As long as you are ok with them dating again a little bit later down the road, and meeting (and hopefully getting along with) their future partner (who will have to accept this special friendship πŸ™‚ ), of course! What do you think?
  4. Hi @anon11 πŸ™‚ For next time, rather than spending too much time discussing these things, maybe skip the family dinner and help them out straight away? Or call family, tell them you'll be a little bit late to dinner? What do you think?
  5. Hi there! Based on the bolded (and subsequent chat), could you please explain how any of this is 'out of the blue'? Thank you! πŸ™‚
  6. Hi @Heid A couple of questions before giving any type of advice: 1. Is he stressed, overworked or tired? Is there anything either at work or with his own family (homesickness? family member unwell?) that could explain why he is out of sorts at the moment? 2. Do you guys have any personal one-on-one quality time together? Do you think that maybe planning a nice dinner either at home when mom is away or some place else, or going for a nice weekend away together could help you guys reconnect?
  7. Did he is mean 'you have a lot going on for you', as in you are really what he is looking for, or 'you have too much [my emphasis] going on at the moment', as in you shouldn't really be dating? I feel like some context is missing - could you expand a little bit? πŸ™‚
  8. Looks like you've found just the right place, then πŸ™‚
  9. Totally πŸ™‚. Sometimes you just want to switch off, you know? Life is so good at the moment, with so much positive stuff right around the corner (thank you, serendipity!). I just want to be able to enjoy the buzz and get ready in calm and tranquillity, with a really good night's sleep or 10 - is that too much to ask? (j/k)
  10. Thank you all for the positive vibes πŸ™‚ . I kind of disagree with the above, though. I took me a while to figure it out (I too used to believe we as individuals are parts of a whole), but now, in hindsight, I see the 5 of us as a whole. A family. A unit supporting each other through thick and thin, whatever the weather. It isn't, but sometimes it feels like it πŸ˜…. But hey, age is just a number, right πŸ˜‰ .
  11. Hi @Ellie48. Well, I guess you have to take him at his word and trust him on that, until his actions prove otherwise.
  12. WOW @bigsteve1, what a story! I'm so sorry for the predicament you both find yourselves in but at the same time, she is only 21 - she might not yet be ready to settle down and probably shouldn't to be honest, given she has not finished her studies. Education first, I think! About the quote above: if everything is amazing, as you say (which is nice, don't get me wrong), why would religion be a big deal? (genuine question, btw). Looking forward to your reply! πŸ™‚
  13. Get the lawyers involved, just to be sure - you might need a restraining order.
  14. My partner and I are in an age-gap relationship of sorts (4 years isn't that much, all things considered) - we are at the same stage in life, have the same values, care about the same things, love our families the same, prioritise our children, want a drama-free zone, are working together on a passion project with our dream boss, have made lots of friends on our journey, have learnt (and taught!) some lessons, have let some friends go but it finally looks like we all are on the same page πŸ™‚ .
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