Jump to content

Pit Bulls


littlemissme
Dogs Enjoying Summer | BestWoof
Dogs Enjoying Summer | BestWoof

Recommended Posts

The little man in my life, he’s furry and snuggly! He plays, eats, but most of all snuggles. If you were to enter my home you would never think that this dog would be the wonderful lap dog that he thinks he is. HE is A RED NOSE PIT BULL and he’s is the sweatiest most loving dog. Rudy is the best thing that has ever happened to me and I just want everyone to know that all Pit Bulls aren’t horrible creatures that kill anything that is in front of them. They are loyal dogs and will do whatever is in the best interest of there owner. Oh by the way he was a rescue and hard to deal with for a long time! A little love and friendly, but stern training and he’s the greatest, LOVING dog.

 

Rudy is a rescue and now the most wonderful, fun, and darling thing in the world to me. He has quit the personality and keeps me on my toes.

 

Anyone that feels that Pit Bulls are chastise in the media, please comment as well as anyone that feels that these dogs should be eradicated. Remember, knowledge is power and anyone that feels these dogs should be killed at all cost I beg you to please PM me your email so I may send you some pictures of this amazing rescue and tell me what you think. He was sent to me as a little angle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 63
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Personally, I don't trust anyone with a pitbull who says "Oh, he wouldn't hurt a fly!"

Because they're always the ones who say they don't understand why when their dog rips off some little kid's face.

 

There are some breeds that are bred to do things better than other breeds.

Greyhounds run, Border Collies herd, and PitBulls kill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's possible to help the animal put their aggression to the side by bringing them up with tons of love and affection...but I think it's always there.

 

Like those TV shows where wild animals have been raised in captivity by humans, HUGE lions that are like big teddy bears...and then suddenly their instinct kicks in when something rubs them wrong and they strike.

 

Anyone agree?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pit Bulls are by nature a fighting breed, it is what they have been bred for centuries to do. Their jaw strength alone can crush an arm and lock on and hold their weight for hours (I've seen them hang for hours from a pull rope!) Having said that, I owned a wonderful, docile Pit Bull and a 140lb Rottie who was a big baby for 8 years, and in my years working as a vet tech met some very nice Pit Pulls, Am. Staffs and Rotties.

 

Having a breed that is predisposed to aggression by their very breed and nature is like having a loaded weapon in your house... you need to be aware of it's power and handle it accordingly. With the proper training and handling and in the right home, these breeds can be wonderful, loving family pets. But to forget their power and where they come from would be a grave error, on the part of the owner, breeder, or person encountering them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

out of all the dogs i've ever owned the best ones have always been variations of the pit bull breed, american and staffordshire.

but they arent dogs that need to be paired with unresponsible or ignorant owners because of their size and disposition.

they have needs that must be met such as proper socialization and exercise, that sadly alot of people dont think they need to provide for them, making for a very unhappy pup.

 

as a working dog breed they are more intolerant of idleness and bad training.. they can't make up for what the handlers lack.

Great breed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For personal experience, with working with the animal shelter and animal hospital for 6 years, ive only been bitten by a pit bull once and it was scared it was my fault and the dog came from an abusive owner But after working with him for a while, he was very nice and was able to be comfortable around people again.Pit bulls are some of the most loyal and loving dogs ever. I believe they are given by names because of their owns. My dog is a chow and they are also very aggressive. When he was a puppy he showed signs that he could be very aggressive. But we trained him well, he is very nice but even playing around ahd wrestling he hurts me sometimes. not on purpose. Working at an animal hospital i was bitten many times by this little lap dogs but the thing is they are small so they dont do much damage. I would get a band aid and wash it and call it a day. If you get bitten by a bigger dog its a different sorry. I hate how pit bulls get bad names.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love all of the "aggressive breeds"...pit bulls, rotties, akitas, german shepards, etc. They are absolutely wonderful dogs as long as their needs are being met, meaning that they have a structured environment where they are not the "pack leader" and they have respect for their owners. With these breeds, they are very intelligent dogs combined with what they have been bred for over the years...leads to potentially dangerous circumstances. If you understand their power and potential and you adress their needs, and both you and the dog have respect for each other, it can be a wonderful loving relationship. I had a wonderful brindle pit bull about 19 years ago who was the sweetest girl ever. BUT she got loose once and ended up running with a pack of wild dogs for 2 days and she killed 2 of the neighbors sheep with the pack of dogs. We finally caught her and got her back home. She was a mess from fighting with the other dogs and she had blood on her from killing and eating the sheep. None of us would have ever thought that she'd do this, but she returned to her natural state and followed her instincts when she felt the freedom which led to what she did. Once we got her back, she never hurt another living thing and was again the perfect lovavble dog until she passed away.

 

My point is that the potential for violence is always there, but if you control the circumstances and the dog feels safe with you and your home, then the chances lessen more and more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

pit bulls and staffies and the same with any other dogs can kill if thats what their owner brings them up like. animals take after their owners, just like a child after their parents, obviously this is a generalisation, but it is how things tend to be done.

 

Exactly, I hate the media and owners (that ruin it for all) that give pits & rotties a bad name They're dogs.

 

It's like saying how children from certain race or group is always misbehaved...it's up to the parents how they will grow up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pitbulls, rotties or any other dog that breed is predisposed to aggression can be a big baby or a terror - depending on their owners and the way they are raised. They have to be treated with the respect they deserve. I have a 140lb and a 80lb rottie and both are biggest boobs and lap dogs I've ever seen. But I still watch them around strangers and especially kids, after all they are still dogs.

 

I think the biggest mistake anyone with any dog can make is leave them alone with a kid and think that everything is going to be okay everytime.

 

Alot of smaller dogs can be way more aggressive then these bigger breeds. But with the smaller jaw and teeth do alot less damage if they bite and generally don't end up in the news.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But with the smaller jaw and teeth do alot less damage if they bite and generally don't end up in the news.

 

That is the point. Any breed of dog is capable of suddenly attacking a human. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool. The real issue is not can they potentially be aggressive, the real problem is what happens when they are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is the point. Any breed of dog is capable of suddenly attacking a human. Anyone who says otherwise is a fool. The real issue is not can they potentially be aggressive, the real problem is what happens when they are.

 

This is true...

 

An elderly woman fell down (this was in a case report probably from 20yr ago at least) and she was mauled to death by her 5 chihuahuas...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I owned an Akita once and they are listed as 'not for the inexperienced dog owner,' and i had to agree with that. I was very experienced, but she was a natural fighting breed, so you had to be very diligent with the training and socialization to ensure the dog understands it's role and how to behave around humans and other animals.

 

the worst problem is when people train dogs on purpose to be aggressive (or don't train them to socialize them), or if the person secretly likes the 'macho' dog factor and doesn't take seriously how much damage a dog can do should it want to. I have no tolerance at all for people who get the breed because they want the tough image, and who tolerate aggression from the dog while pretending it is OK or that the dog is harmless. Those are the PEOPLE you need to fear, not the dog.

 

I lived in a neighborhood where a man had a labrador that terrorized and bit other dogs in the neighborhood (which is unusual as they are normally a friendly breed), but the man seemed to enjoy it when his dog leaped on or growled at other people's dogs, like he had the baddest dog in the neighborhood which meant that both he and his dogs were studs. so the guy had turned a mild breed into an obnoxious and aggressive one, because he tolerated and encouraged aggression in his dog.

 

So a lot of how a dog turns out is based on the owner, and how they are. I watch the owner as much as the dog, becuase you can tell by how the owner behaves whether the dog is trained or aggression is tolerated. If you have a neighbor who lets their dog run wild without discipline, and doesn't correct the dog when it gets even mildly aggressive or overenthusiastic, that is the dog i would fear, regardless of the dog's size, because the owner has not taught it how to behave.

 

It is the same principle that produces bully children, and it also produces bully dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interestingly I too was never bit by these 'aggressive breeds' during the 4 years I worked at the vet hospital, or the 2 years I was in school for it and interning. I was, however, bitten by a Lab, a few Jack Russells, and an Australian Cattle Dog. Chows were questionable too.

 

As ED mentioned, proper socialization, discipline and exercise is critical, having an 'alpha owner', and being aware of the potential the breed has and being careful with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pitbulls, rotties or any other dog that breed is predisposed to aggression can be a big baby or a terror - depending on their owners and the way they are raised. They have to be treated with the respect they deserve. I have a 140lb and a 80lb rottie and both are biggest boobs and lap dogs I've ever seen. But I still watch them around strangers and especially kids, after all they are still dogs.

 

I think the biggest mistake anyone with any dog can make is leave them alone with a kid and think that everything is going to be okay everytime.

 

Alot of smaller dogs can be way more aggressive then these bigger breeds. But with the smaller jaw and teeth do alot less damage if they bite and generally don't end up in the news.

 

This is important too- since the majority of dogs who bite do so out of fear and insecurity, rather than aggression. And most who do bite send out warning signals far before a bite that we might just not be picking up on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's good to see so much intelligence here rather than the judgment you see in many other places. I too think that Pits and other "aggressive" breeds can be wonderful, loving pets. But as you all have said... ALL dogs need to be in a secure, structured environment where they are NOT the pack leader. The owner is the pack leader and the dog (whatever it's breed) will respond likewise.

 

It's funny about the Chihuahuas, I read somewhere that they have the highest percentage number of bites toward humans. And we have three of them. Two of them are complete scaredy-cats but the eldest... Trixie... she is a 140lb dog in a 10lb body. She has a LOT of personality and it's taken us quite a while to bring her around. She was abused badly by her previous owner and was actually in "quarantine" at the pound for biting a Vet tech. But my g/f adopted her and through a few years of calm training, she is a completely different dog. She still is a bit aggressive with strangers but no where like she used to be.

 

Chihuahua reputation problems come from owners who think they're toys and want one because Paris Hilton has one. They don't train them, they just carry them around in purses and spoil them rotten.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

poor breeding does ALOT to destroy sound temperments also.

with popular dog trends comes rampant breeding with no consideration of temperment, so very bad dispositions are bred into the next generations even against their standards.

When golden retrivers and labs were most popular the frequency of dog bites by that breed spiked, as we all know pit bulls popularity has also made a massive surge as a 'status dog' to make their owners look tough. which is a joke because people like that are horribly irresponsible towards the animals proper care.

 

so anyway... same thing with cocker spaniels. with improper breeding they can be vicious and fearful dogs when their standard is to be loving trusting family pets.

thats how much bad breeding can do to an animal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I owned one previously and she was a complete doll. She loved all animals from birds to squirrals and everything in between. There wasn't an aggressive bone in her body but I contribute that to raising her since she was 8 weeks old in a very loving enviornment.

 

I would definitely own another if I had a bigger place. The only thing I would be leary of is rescuing an older one from the shelter as I don't know their history. I would probably go with a really young one so that I can ensure that it is raised properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...