Jump to content

Have one dog - want to get anther but


LazyDaisy

Recommended Posts

Hi ENA, I have a 3 year old female pug mix. She is about 20 lbs. I would like to get another dog but I'm afraid she would hurt it. I brought a dog from a shelter over the house last night and she went after it two times pretty bad. Now my friend brings her dog over all the time and my dog is fine with that one. She started bringing it over when it was a puppy. I'm not sure if that makes a difference. I really would like to have a 2nd dog to keep my dog company. Is this something dogs go through to determine pecking order or is my dog just mean?

 

I didn't like that 2nd dog anyway because it was barking its head off the entire time it was here, but I am supposed to be going to see another dog on Saturday. I'm not sure I should bother. Could it be that my dog prefers being the only dog of the house? Is there a special way you are supposed to introduce a 2nd dog so they don't get hurt?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bringing a second dog into an established household is actually difficult and your dog doesn't necessarily think like a human. Meaning she doesn't really see that as "oh goody I have a companion" and sees it more as "oh crud an intruder to the pack and pecking order."

 

So even with the sweetest dog in the world, you as a human, will need to be well versed in how to manage that transition and be sure that you establish and enforce a new pecking order. You might want to read up on that - plenty of materials online and in books on introducing a new dog to the pack and how to do it successfully and correctly. It is very important that you do read up on that. It really isn't as simple as just throwing the two dogs together and going "ok, be friends now".

 

There is also the factor that animals, just like humans, can like and dislike each other specifically. So a dog may be super happy with one dog and all buddies and completely nasty with another dog and turn your home into a perpetual battle field because they hate each other. This has nothing to do with the new dog's age, btw. If your dog is extremely territorial, then this might not be a good idea at large. It doesn't make her a bad dog - it just makes her a dog who thinks and acts like a dog, not a human.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who has five dogs and a rescue or two from the countryside where I live, I've become a decent expert at introducing dogs to each other. My trainer at the time recommended this website to me: link removed and I have used the actions it outlines successfully.

 

You cannot just stick a new dog into the house and think that it will all be fine, dog or cat. Sometimes it works yes, but most times no. Do the steps outlined in the link I've given you including examining why you want another dog and how to choose a dog that's compatible and then introducing the two dogs to each other in a way that will be successful. And if your dog just won't share his territory with another dog accept that and move on. Dogs are like people in the fact that they do have distinct personalities and reactions to stimuli that may differ drastically. Dogs are not like people in that they won't and can't reason or be reasoned with on a thought level, they go by instinct primarily and the instinct doesn't always tell them that more dogs are better. Breed can make a difference in that as well, I own large huskies and shepherds who tend to have retained that need for a pack that their ancestors, the wolf, have. There are other breeds of dogs that do not have that strong of a need for a pack and they don't always want to be anything, but the only dog in the household.

 

Do your research, realize that you likely won't just a dog who is instantly behaved and magically accepted by your dog--it will take work on your part. For instance, you said the other dog barked all the time it was at your house, but you didn't even give the animal a chance to get acclimated or your dog either. You can't discount a dog based on one day in strange surroundings with behavior they will always exhibit. The more dogs you have the more work too, not less. I train and work out with my dogs constantly as well as doing socializing exercises with them and each other. I also have 20 acres of land where they have plenty of space to run and play and work off their energy and establish their pecking order with a minimum of blood-letting so to speak.

 

So seriously think the thought all the way through and be prepared to go see a trainer to help you, and the dogs, acclimate if you choose to go ahead and get another dog. Take into account the size of your place and the time you can devote to them as well since as DancingFool points out having more dogs does not necessarily guarantee they'll not miss you when you're gone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, if you want 2 dogs, having a male and a female combo usually means less fighting or territoriality. And if you have an older adult dog, getting a younger dog rather than another adult dog also helps, since it will not be two adults competing for one territory, and adults are usually kinder to young dogs.

 

You also might trying bringing your dog to the shelter and seeing how it behaves before you try to bring a dog home. I've seen some dogs take an instant dislike to each other, and some get along from the start.

 

And yes, some dogs do want to be an only dog! I had one dog like that... he was very attached to me and very jealous of any other dog or person... but I think if you bring in the RIGHT dog (i.e., another young male dog or puppy), your older female might accept it.

 

You might want to try also bringing in a more submissive/playful breed who is less likely to try to compete with your pug. Get a 'love bug' type breed or mix, dogs that are know to like other dogs, and if you bring in such a friendly dog, it might get along better with your pug. For example, I wouldn't try to mix a terrier or a Chihuahua with a pug because they are both spunky/feisty breeds, but if you bring in a love bug/easy going breed they might meld better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your advice. I think I will just keep the one dog for now. I know when my BF moves in my house in a few years he is going to want his own dog. I will keep that link so we can read up on it. Its going to be hard because my dog is very territorial - even with her dog friends that come visit - she puts them in their place now and then. He wants a tiny dog like a chiahauahu or a yorkie. Who knows, she might be more gentle with a tiny one. I was trying to bring a dog in the same size as her so they would be good playing companions. But maybe she was threatened by the size.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

btw, no your dog is not mean... she just sees an alien dog invading her territory, and may also think she is protecting you. so that is why it is better to bring in a younger dog or a submissive dog and a dog of the opposite sex, because your dog will see those as less of a threat to her territory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First, if you want 2 dogs, having a male and a female combo usually means less fighting or territoriality. And if you have an older adult dog, getting a younger dog rather than another adult dog also helps, since it will not be two adults competing for one territory, and adults are usually kinder to young dogs.

 

I'm sorry but that is not accurate. In fact a big age difference can really make it hard on the older dog as the younger dog is more energetic and playful and will harass the more mature dog, which can lead to the older dog snapping and hurting the younger dog. Also, unless you are there to constantly enforce the pecking order, at some point the younger dog will start challenging the older dog for dominance. Animals do not think "aww he is just a kid". Sorry but that's human reasoning.

 

You also might trying bringing your dog to the shelter and seeing how it behaves before you try to bring a dog home. I've seen some dogs take an instant dislike to each other, and some get along from the start.

 

That might help to determine just how socialized and social your dog is, however how a dog acts in his own territory and outside of it can be dramatically different. So not really a great determinant of how things will go at home with a new dog.

 

 

You might want to try also bringing in a more submissive/playful breed who is less likely to try to compete with your pug. Get a 'love bug' type breed or mix, dogs that are know to like other dogs, and if you bring in such a friendly dog, it might get along better with your pug. For example, I wouldn't try to mix a terrier or a Chihuahua with a pug because they are both spunky/feisty breeds, but if you bring in a love bug/easy going breed they might meld better.

 

Before you get a high energy breed, you better be sure that you have the space and the time to exercise them and don't count on the two dogs exercising each other. The high energy dog can quickly become the anxious and destructive dog if not handled properly and given and exercise and attention it needs to burn off that energy. Also, see above in that two very different energy dogs may actually end up as a big problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

her dog is 3 years old so still a young dog. She'd be fine with a younger dog at that age. btw, I am very experienced with dogs and that is not 'human thinking.' Dogs are pack animals, and they recognize juvenile dogs and do not harm them the way they would an older dog, nor see the younger dog as a big threat to their position in the pack hierarchy, which is probably why her dog is fine with her friends dog that she's known since it was a puppy so they've worked out the dominance hierarchy there. I agree that a very old dog might be exhausted by a puppy who is too energetic, but her dog is only 3 years old so in its prime and well able to have fun and both tolerate and enjoy a younger dog or puppy.

 

I also didn't tell her to get a high energy breed... I said a submissive or playful breed, i.e., a breed that is more inclined to show LESS dominant or aggressive traits and body language, and hence not set her pug off. A 'playful' breed is a breed that would rather play than fight. I said nothing about getting a high energy dog and you're reading something into that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to agree with the mentality that a younger dog is best. As I said in my original post, she gets along with my friends dog well and she met that dog as a puppy. I have also tried a female with her so that could have been part of the problem last night.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pug mix?

A jug?

That's what I have,

THe thing about bringing in another dog is you need to assess if your dog is a pack dog or a companion dog.

Anything remotely pug is a companiion animal... THey no likely to share their human, lol.

My BF has 2 dogs (a husky and a boxer) & although they all get along GREAT, the boxer & husky want to sleep TOGETHER (away from humans) whereas my dog will cry his little head off if he's not with me.

It's not about them being his dogs, either.

THe husky and the pug have been "together" for years whereas the boxer is only 9 months.

Personally, based on your breed, I wouldn't get another dog unless it was th exact same breed & even then I'd be weary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really would like to have a 2nd dog to keep my dog company.

Getting another dog for company of each other is often a sign of the owner being more interested in giving less time to their dog/s care and management and not more. Like one of the members said... It takes even more effort to mange both dogs. Kind of like raising and disciplining children.

 

And if you have an older adult dog, getting a younger dog rather than another adult dog also helps, since it will not be two adults competing for one territory, and adults are usually kinder to young dogs.

Actually I had to break up a dog fight today in my house between my parents 6 year old collie and my puppy. Why? Because the older dog felt insecure that the puppy was being cuddled on my lap.

 

And it is not the only fight they had. There have been many more in the past because of insecurity or territorial guarding.

 

You also might trying bringing your dog to the shelter and seeing how it behaves before you try to bring a dog home. I've seen some dogs take an instant dislike to each other, and some get along from the start.

My dog got along very well with other dogs at the dog park. It was a huge surprise when he started getting into fights with other dogs who live in the house because both dogs became territorial. Just like the OPs dog, I have a welsh corgi and he is very territorial.

 

You might want to try also bringing in a more submissive/playful breed who is less likely to try to compete with your pug. Get a 'love bug' type breed or mix, dogs that are know to like other dogs

My parents have a LASSIE. Collies are NOT aggressive nor are they competitive. If I had not intervened the fight today or previous fights that have occurred between them, they would of ripped each other's throats- all started by the collie.

 

Thanks for your advice. I think I will just keep the one dog for now. I know when my BF moves in my house in a few years he is going to want his own dog. He wants a tiny dog like a chiahauahu or a yorkie. Who knows, she might be more gentle with a tiny one.

chihuahuas are one of the most aggressive dog breeds out there -more so than a pit bull (link removed). If your pug is aggressive, this would be a very bad combination to have.

 

I'm sorry OP... I would hold off on getting a second dog since your dog does not want to share. It's fair for both dogs to avoid creating a hostile environment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice everyone. My BF will be disappointed he can't have a chihuahua. Maybe he could try a yorkie. I think my dog is a jug. So it would be hard to get another dog of the same breed. She gets along really well with a pit bull, boston terrior mix. Getting a second dog might be easier once my BF is living here because my dog is very submissive to him, whereas she walks all over me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...
Getting a second dog might be easier once my BF is living here because my dog is very submissive to him, whereas she walks all over me.

 

Here is the root of the problem: you are not the pack leader and so your dog is assuming the role. Take some obedience classes to learn how to properly discipline and be in charge of your pack (you and your dog are a pack of 2). If you don't learn how to do that, you may find over time that other behavioral challenges will start cropping up. I have read that Pugs are one of the most challenging breeds for inexperienced dog owners. Your boyfriend may help but ultimately its your dog, your responsibility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...