Jump to content

Thinking about getting a dog, need advice.


blindreepr

Recommended Posts

So I'm thinking about getting a dog. I'm living completely alone for the first time in my life and I'm finding it rather.....lonely.

 

A little bit about me:

 

I'm living in a studio in an apartment complex in downtown SF. So I don't have much room, so a small dog is probably the route I'll have to go.

 

I work 32 hours a week in the evenings, from 3:00-11:30. Starting at the end of the month, I'll have school from 8-12 in the morning on tuesday's and thursday's. Other than that my free time usually spent at home as I'm new to the city and haven't made any new friends in the 5 months I've been here. I'm not an extroverted guy so I don't plan on being out all the time and leaving the dog alone.

 

I may visit my friends who live an hour south of me by taking the train, so again, small enough to fit in a kennel that I can carry with me on the train is what I need.

 

I was thinking of getting an young adult-senior dog from the shelter. I'm fairly certain that I don't have the time for a puppy right now and wouldn't want to do that to a dog.

 

I realize I'd need to make time to take the dog on walks, which isn't a problem because I walk everywhere.

 

Any advice or breeds that might suit my lifestyle?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was going to say to make sure you rescue! Seems to fit your lifestyle anyway. Thank you for that!

 

Do you have any specific allergies? Does your apartment complex/landlord have any breed restrictions?

 

No animal allergies.

 

I don't think there is any breed restrictions. I'm sure they wouldn't allow me to get a pit bull, but those dogs are too big for my place anyways. It's too bad though because those dogs can be huge cuddle bugs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surprisingly larger breeds are better for smaller spaces. For example in my city many people with studio's or 1 bedrooms will have a great dane. They are very relaxed and don't need a lot of exercise. Smaller dogs are generally always running around and yappy.

 

Having a dog is a great way to meet people also. I live by myself and met most of my dates and friends at the local dog parks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surprisingly larger breeds are better for smaller spaces. For example in my city many people with studio's or 1 bedrooms will have a great dane. They are very relaxed and don't need a lot of exercise. Smaller dogs are generally always running around and yappy.

 

I have to disagree there. Great Danes are known to be good apartment dogs because their personality and lifestyle is a little mellow. However, the majority of big dogs come with big "issues." Granted, these are only issues if they cause damage.

 

Bigger Dog = Bigger Bark

Bigger Dog = Bigger Accidents

Bigger Dog are more likely to drool. Though some small dogs get the Napolean/little dog complex, most people would be afraid of a bigger dog with bigger teeth than a small dog.

 

All these things are either correctable or are infrequent, but no dog will follow all breed stereotypes. Your best bet is to play with lots of dogs. Rescue if that works for you. But find one that fits your energy level and doesn't get carried away with the noise.

 

I have a chihuahua that is nice to everyone and barks no more than once a day. She is paper-trained, so I don't have to make 20 trips outside (i live on an upper floor) for potty time. Keep that in mind when choosing too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First I commend you on getting an older shelter dog and being realistic that a puppy, while cute and small and sweet, doesn't fit with your current lifestyle. I also like that you are planning to get a breed that you can take with you and spend a lot of time with.

 

Do some serious internet research and consider calling an animal behaviorist or veterinarian and ask their opinion on how to find the best fit for you. They should be able to point you in the right direction.

 

Good luck with your doggie quest!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Surprisingly larger breeds are better for smaller spaces. For example in my city many people with studio's or 1 bedrooms will have a great dane. They are very relaxed and don't need a lot of exercise. Smaller dogs are generally always running around and yappy.

 

Having a dog is a great way to meet people also. I live by myself and met most of my dates and friends at the local dog parks.

 

I really have to disagree with this.

 

Just because a big dog is gentle doesn't mean they don't need much exercise. They do.

 

Dachshunds and yorkies for instance are so small they can actually get a lot of exercise running thru a small apt.

 

I think it is rather cruel to put a large dog in a studio apt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Danes and Bernards are the biggest dogs I know and both of them make great appartment dogs.

 

A great dane doing something as simple as wagging his tail really hard can mean an entire contents of a coffee table being ambushed.

 

No, a great dane is not a good choice for a studio apt. They can be gentle when full grown, but if he is getting a rescue one has NO idea of the temperament of the parents. Only very well bred danes have the typical dane personality. You dno't get that when you get a rescue that might have been bred by parents not up to breed standard.

 

They are way too big for a studio apt. Even tho they are not always energetic they are still way too big for that space. they DO still need exercise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A great dane doing something as simple as wagging his tail really hard can mean an entire contents of a coffee table being ambushed.

 

No, a great dane is not a good choice for a studio apt. They can be gentle when full grown, but if he is getting a rescue one has NO idea of the temperament of the parents. Only very well bred danes have the typical dane personality. You dno't get that when you get a rescue that might have been bred by parents not up to breed standard.

 

They are way too big for a studio apt. Even tho they are not always energetic they are still way too big for that space. they DO still need exercise.

 

Well every dog needs exercise and you shouldn't count on a house size to give it to them. I have met several danes and bernards and am yet to find one that is hyper, not saying that they can't be. Every dog with proper training can be molded into a perfectly behaved dog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just could not ever recommend someone with a studio apt get a dog that large. Just because a dog is docile doesn't mean it is comfortable in such a small space.

 

A small dog that is not as hyper is a better choice, IMO. Chi's and jack russels are small but a bit too hyper.

 

I would actually suggest a dachshund not because i have one but beacuse they are also very docile and when they DO get that burst of energy (ALL DOGS GET THIS regardless of breed unless they are very old) they can run thru a tiny place and get exhausted. The caution i have with a dachshund is that they are incredibly hard to housebreak and take enormous patience during this period.

 

If that dane or st bernard gets that same energy burst (and he will, maybe not as often but he will) he will destroy an apt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just could not ever recommend someone with a studio apt get a dog that large. Just because a dog is docile doesn't mean it is comfortable in such a small space.

 

A small dog that is not as hyper as lets say a chi is a better choice, IMO.

 

I would actually suggest a dachshund not because i have one but beacuse they are also very docile and when they DO get that burst of energy (ALL DOGS GET THIS regardless of breed unless they are very old) they can run thru a tiny place and get exhausted. The caution i have with a dachshund is that they are incredibly hard to housebreak and take enormous patience during this period.

If that dane or st bernard gets that same energy burst (and he will, maybe not as often but he will) he will destroy an apt.

 

Couldn't agree more with you here. My ex's parents had two both pissed in the house and one pooped as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe the smaller dog is a good idea but I think that most of them are yappy and hyper, both which can be annoying.

 

But not all of them are. And even the ones that are predispositioned to this can have exceptions. If he adopts from something like pet finder, and the dog is a little older, he will be able to find out if it is a more calm pet or not. and he will also know if it is house trained.

 

If i ever get another dog i will do the same. I will get a dachshund a bit older that is house trained with an even keeled temperament. They are out there, many of them. Getting them from a puppy is very hard if you don't have the time required to housetrain. They are one of the hardest to housebreak. BUT still yet the best dogs for my lifestyle and probably one of the best small apartment dogs. They don't have a yappy bark like a chi or other small ones. But they are not for everyone so i never push them on anyone, but for a guy in a studio apt who will be home a lot, they are a decent choice...if he can get over their funny little bodies LOL (which i think is adorable but anyway).. They are the least energetic of the small breeds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a chihuahua that is nice to everyone and barks no more than once a day. She is paper-trained, so I don't have to make 20 trips outside (i live on an upper floor) for potty time. Keep that in mind when choosing too.

 

Another tip piggy backing off of iwalas post - a very large dog will have HUGE puddles when they have an accident vs a small dog having a little silver dollar size puddle.

 

Many dogs can have accidents, especially during trianing. A small studio apt will get a lot more smelly with a large dog's accidents vs a small one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want a big dog, go with an Irish Wolfhound. If a things worth doing its worth doing right, right? All kidding aside, Wolfies are a sweet-hearted, patient and loyal breed. They tend to take everyone as a friend, though, so if you expect him to pull guard dog duty, don't count on him biting any burglars, though his sheer size may scare them off.

 

If you want a smaller dog, get a bull terrier, or even a miniature bull-terrier. Thats just me though. Bull terriers and mini bulls are loving and energetic dogs. They're short haired so they don't require much grooming, and they're energy level makes exercising them yourself almost redundant, though walks should still be taken. Bull Terriers courageousness and goof ball attitude make them very entertaining pets. Hope you find a dog that will be with you for years to come. Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back to the OP ['tho I like the Irish Wolfhound idea go to an animal shelter and rescue a dog. Not only might you earn yourself a true companion, you'll also save a life. Some words of advice from years of experience helping others select a dog prior to training it.

1. Look for a dog whose size 'fits' your environment. You've laid out your situation, so I'd suggest that a dog 20 kg or less would be best. But not a toy dog, from what I read that's not what you're looking for.

2. Look for a dog that shows restraint, even hesitancy, on first meeting. Avoid dogs that rush up to you, or jump up on you. Sure, that's "just enthusiasm" people say, but it can lead to problems later when that hyperactive dog is introduced to its new living space.

3. Look for a dog that responds evenly to a human voice, especially when spoken to calmly.

4. Observe closely the reaction of the dog to physical contact. Does it cringe, does it accept it calmly, or does it go into a fit of ecstasy?

5. Look for a dog that is at least 1 year old, unless you wish to go through the agonies of training a pup. It is my view that a dog is at its most receptive to training between the ages of 1 and 3 years.

 

If you prefer a single-breed dog, I know how much pleasure people have had from Schnauzers or Boston Terriers. A handy size, and great temperaments. They're undemanding, happy to do whatever you're in the mood to do. The Boston is a natural clown too, and if you're feeling down, they're just the animal to bring you out of it. Check YouTube for vids of either breed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...