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Grief Counselling as a Career?!


mgirl

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I know this is a long shot, but recently i've been thinking about a (second) career for myself. A few years ago, i completed a Psychology degree, with the purpose of becoming a Counselling Psychologist.

 

Well, i don't think i can become a Psychologist, i just don't have the time for the study.

 

But, i do think i can become a Counsellor. It is only one year of study and the primary difference i think is that Psychology is based in theory, whereas Counselling is, i think, based on strategies - am yet to do my research, but my theory so far.

 

Thing is, i have recently become aware that i am interested in "depression, grief, old age and loneliness (i guess depression comes in here too)..."

 

What do you think? Do you think there is a "market" for Grief Counselling (i mean, i need to earn a living somehow - meaning got to earn money from the thing i do)

 

Do you know anybody who has gone through "grief" counselling, or old aged counselling?

 

I know this is a niche question, but worth posting

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I think there is a market for it. The only thing I would urge you to think about it whether you'd be limiting yourself by narrowing your focus so much. If you look at most counselors or psychologists advertisements they usually list many areas that they focus on. For example: depression, anxiety, grief, aging, body image, sexuality. Those issues usually fall under the umbrella of "individual therapy". Some specialize in family therapy or couples- and substance abuse is also a common specialization- since it is so prevalent. But all of those categories can overlap at different levels, so you must be a jack of all trades at times. (For example, someone experiencing grief(1.) can develop a substance abuse issue (2.) if they self-medicate with alcohol, and in turn ruin their marriage(3.)- they may need help with all 3 issues when seeking a therapist)

 

Many therapists will treat a broad range of issues, but market themselves as using a particular therapy method. For example: Cognitive behavioral therapist, psychoanalyst, etc.

 

But, i do think i can become a Counsellor. It is only one year of study and the primary difference i think is that Psychology is based in theory, whereas Counselling is, i think, based on strategies - am yet to do my research, but my theory so far

 

One of the major difference between counselors and psychologists is that psychologists have the "Dr." title because they have completed a PhD program which includes a major research project/thesis. One of the advantages to that is the ability to teach at a college or university aside from seeing patients in private practice. Their focus on research is what really sets them apart.

 

A licensed mental health counselor (LMHC) usually completes graduate work which includes and internship and a state exam. You can go into private practice and collect from insurance companies with that credential.

 

Both PhD's and LMHC's maket themselves as therapists and are essentially mental health professionals. Every counseling strategy/therapy method out there is based on an underlying theory- and both types of professionals have to understand both the theory and the practice.

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Thanks so much BellaDonna! You sound like a true professional

 

Interesting to note that both options focus on using a particular theory. I'll have to check with the University contact as to whether this holds true in my country.

 

I have no interest in teaching at University level, so the counseling option sounds better for me.

 

Lastly, thanks for your advice on self promotion. I have seen those ads and what you say makes sense! Especially how 'conditions' may be related. I hope i learn all that stuff in the course.

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