Jump to content

"dating" or "going out"


The_man
 Share

Recommended Posts

In my opinion I would take it to mean if you are dating, that you are seeing each other but not yet exclusive.

 

If someone is " going out" it has probably come to the point of being exclusive and not seeing anyone else. " Going out" I think would be what some of us older folks used to call " going steady" .

 

I am not sure if this answered your question. Hope so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think people use the terms loosely nowadays. I've heard both of them applied to the beginning stages of the relationship...and to the more committed stages by various paople. To me they are basically synonymous...but then again, I like to assign very precise labels to things, so if the meaning really mattered, I would steer clear of using either one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

uh oh. i thought going out was just going out and dating's got some kind of exclusivity involved.

 

Well that's confusion for you!

 

 

Boy that could be confusing . You and I have exact opposite thoughts on it . I am basing my response on how my kids, whom are now age 20 and 25 ,spoke of dating and going out being different. At least that is how it seems to be around where I live.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To me dating is just that, dating ... could be only one person or seeing more than one person.

 

But 'going out' is an exclusive relationship... boyfriend/girlfriend type thing.

 

When I was younger if someone wanted me to be their girlfriend they may say 'will you go out with me southerngirl'... So at least where I grew up, thats what it meant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dating = episodes; i.e. a 'date' on Friday night. It's time limited, in that it would be in hours, and that each date had to be arranged. No big expectations.

 

Going out = boyfriend/girlfriend. You take it for granted that you will see each other at the weekend etc.

 

Maybe there is a cultural divide, because I know in the US the term 'dating' is used more than it is in the UK. Which I think is nice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...