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My workplace is sickening and triggering


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SIGNS OF A TOXIC BOSS | THERAPIST R...
SIGNS OF A TOXIC BOSS | THERAPIST REACTS TO RAISSA KENGNE

I'd avoid expending energy on painting this place out to be soooooo toxic that anyone would quit.  Because it's not true.  And it's an opportunity for you to get really honest with yourself without throwing the baby out with the bath water. 

No need at all to share it here but instead of getting defensive about how no one -even the most intelligent, fast, diligent, thoughtful, team player employee like you -would never tolerate this - get down to nitty gritty and decide what in this job you realize is just not a good fit for you even if it might be for someone else.  That way you can be a better picker for your next job.  For example, I've worked for humongous companies, small businesses, governments and non profits.  I attended three different universities in my academic career. 

I was a headhunter many years ago for a couple of years so I also have that particular knowledge about workplaces.  I admitted to myself my deficits/preferences that meant that certain places -even if "toxic" -nevertheless would not be right for me.  It's humbling sometimes. And essential.  IMO

It's really ok if your skill set doesn't match up perfectly with this company so that despite the toxic elements it's also not a good fit for you to shine in.  It's not true no one can shine in this company or everyone in your division would have left already.  For example.  Humility in that sense will get you a long way.  Certainly have self-confidence in your skills but the most confident, smart people I know -- know what they don't know and know their deficits.  We all have them.

And no I would never like a company where feedback was public. Obviously like Fudgie I take "confidentiality" with a grain of salt depending on the circumstances.  But no I would not like that at all.  

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11 minutes ago, Batya33 said:

I'd avoid expending energy on painting this place out to be soooooo toxic that anyone would quit.  Because it's not true.  And it's an opportunity for you to get really honest with yourself without throwing the baby out with the bath water. 

No need at all to share it here but instead of getting defensive about how no one -even the most intelligent, fast, diligent, thoughtful, team player employee like you -would never tolerate this - get down to nitty gritty and decide what in this job you realize is just not a good fit for you even if it might be for someone else.  That way you can be a better picker for your next job.  For example, I've worked for humongous companies, small businesses, governments and non profits.  I attended three different universities in my academic career. 

I was a headhunter many years ago for a couple of years so I also have that particular knowledge about workplaces.  I admitted to myself my deficits/preferences that meant that certain places -even if "toxic" -nevertheless would not be right for me.  It's humbling sometimes. And essential.  IMO

It's really ok if your skill set doesn't match up perfectly with this company so that despite the toxic elements it's also not a good fit for you to shine in.  It's not true no one can shine in this company or everyone in your division would have left already.  For example.  Humility in that sense will get you a long way.  Certainly have self-confidence in your skills but the most confident, smart people I know -- know what they don't know and know their deficits.  We all have them.

And no I would never like a company where feedback was public. Obviously like Fudgie I take "confidentiality" with a grain of salt depending on the circumstances.  But no I would not like that at all.  

I don't understand why you insist on making it sound like this is a "normal" working environment simply because you experienced a similar pressurized environment. I'm not trying to paint this as "toxic", I'm simply explaining my day to day situation and how I am currently feeling. You sound very proud of having worked in the type of environment that works you to the bone and I think you've been conditioned this is a normal way of working. 

Also - to the "it is not true that no one can shine in this company" - where did I say no one could shine in this company? I never said this in any of my posts. Once again, I'm decrypting my personal experience and you are extrapolating. 

I too went to three different universities during my academic career (all located in different countries) and attended various summer courses in other parts of the world. I'm not some scared individual who cannot deal with people with different backgrounds. I am an expat where I currently live and moved out at 18 to go study abroad right away when most kids my age were still living at home. I personally think this speaks for itself. 

Like I said before, I already assessed the fact that this company is not for me because of its culture. It's nothing to do with my industry or my role, it's the company culture itself and as I said, this is the reason why I'm seeking to leave. The assessment is done and has been done for a while now. I know my weaknesses and my strengths and I know full well I am unable to capitalize on my strengths in this company. This is all I've been saying throughout my posts. 

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1 minute ago, RuedeRivoli said:

I don't understand why you insist on making it sound like this is a "normal" working environment simply because you experienced a similar pressurized environment. I'm not trying to paint this as "toxic", I'm simply explaining my day to day situation and how I am currently feeling. 

Also - to the "it is not true that no one can shine in this company" - where did I say no one could shine in this company? Once again, I'm talking about my personal experience and you are extrapolating. 

I too went to three different universities during my academic career (all located in different countries) and attended various summer courses in other parts of the world. I'm not some scared ignorant individual who cannot deal with people with different perspectives. I am an expat where I currently live and moved out at 18 to go study abroad right away when most kids my age were still living at home. I personally think this speaks for itself. 

Like I said before, I already assessed the fact that this company is not for me because of its culture. It's nothing to do with my industry or my role, it's the company culture itself and as I said, this is the reason why I'm seeking to leave. The assessment is done and has been done for a while now. 

I didn't write anything of what you said.  I've read many of your posts -and sense a lot of defensiveness and perhaps a touch of arrogance stemming from insecurity and the need to defend yourself.  It's a great exercise to get down to the nitty gritty, dose of humility, seek clarity and self-honesty.  I'm not going to debate with you about what I didn't write and I'm not going to argue with you given your penchant for defensiveness. Nothing I wrote was to put you on the defensive.  Yes, this culture is not right for you. 

My assessment of how you approach your analysis is that it results in you picking the wrong places-or being at risk for it -and getting in your own way.  That's just my humble opinion.  In all my years of work experience and in many different environments what I wrote above has served me fairly well.  So I share it with you.  Take it or leave it. 

And I'd hesitate if I were you to say your "assessment is done" as if it is set in stone.  There's great value to being open to personal growth that results from reassessing.  Again take it or leave it.  Good luck with your search -I'm sure any company would be fortunate to have you -you seem like a very smart, hard and diligent worker.  

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9 minutes ago, Batya33 said:

I didn't write anything of what you said.  I've read many of your posts -and sense a lot of defensiveness and perhaps a touch of arrogance stemming from insecurity and the need to defend yourself.  It's a great exercise to get down to the nitty gritty, dose of humility, seek clarity and self-honesty.  I'm not going to debate with you about what I didn't write and I'm not going to argue with you given your penchant for defensiveness. Nothing I wrote was to put you on the defensive.  Yes, this culture is not right for you. 

My assessment of how you approach your analysis is that it results in you picking the wrong places-or being at risk for it -and getting in your own way.  That's just my humble opinion.  In all my years of work experience and in many different environments what I wrote above has served me fairly well.  So I share it with you.  Take it or leave it. 

And I'd hesitate if I were you to say your "assessment is done" as if it is set in stone.  There's great value to being open to personal growth that results from reassessing.  Again take it or leave it.  Good luck with your search -I'm sure any company would be fortunate to have you -you seem like a very smart, hard and diligent worker.  

I appreciate the advice, certainly, but while I seem to be defensive, some of your posts do come across as rather arrogant almost condescending. I won't quote the particular bits, but since I can remember, there is always a touch of overconfidence in your posts which convey a certain tone which may or may not trigger the OP. You seem to be very proud of your career path, which is enviable, but there is a way to phrase this without the touch of condescension. 

As far as you not saying anything of what I mentioned above, I bolded the bits in the quoted post. I didn't make any of this up. All is in your previous post and I just responded to what was quoted. 

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I personally wouldn't tolerate the kind of work environment you describe.  Again, where I live it's illegal to force people to work as many hours as you seem to be required to.  If a company told me "We are assigning you this project and you are expected to work over the weekend to complete it" I could forward that demand to the labor board and the company would be disciplined.

Now, I'm not talking about pitching in during a crisis (for example, a few times at my previous company the automated system broke down so everyone stayed late to process shipments manually) or checking your emails over the weekend or during off hours (which I did regularly), but mandating working 16 hour days plus weekends just isn't legal.  It's also not healthy.  A reasonable work/life balance is crucial.

I hope you're actively searching for a new position.  With your experience I believe you'll find another one quickly.  In the meantime, do your best but don't ruin your health over a job.  It's not worth it.

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3 hours ago, RuedeRivoli said:

I appreciate the advice, certainly, but while I seem to be defensive, some of your posts do come across as rather arrogant almost condescending. I won't quote the particular bits, but since I can remember, there is always a touch of overconfidence in your posts which convey a certain tone which may or may not trigger the OP. You seem to be very proud of your career path, which is enviable, but there is a way to phrase this without the touch of condescension. 

As far as you not saying anything of what I mentioned above, I bolded the bits in the quoted post. I didn't make any of this up. All is in your previous post and I just responded to what was quoted. 

No need to bold.  Sorry I couldn't help.  Good luck as I wrote above!

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6 hours ago, RuedeRivoli said:

 

1) The bolded bit. It happened to me too during the summer. My manager sent feedback forms for me to written provide feedback on other members of the team on the HR portal... I don't agree with this at all and it makes you even more paranoid as to what is being said behind your back. 

2) Of course, most companies talk about mental health and employee wellness as a tick the box exercise, but it goes to show this one simply focuses on one thing - performance. 

3) Most times, when I do overtime, I simply do not have a choice. While my manager will not tell me "you need to do overtime", they also never question why I'm staying late on a regular basis because it seems to be "normal" over here. I remember when I started, my manager had to order some 24h token for me to log in and they asked me: "Do you want me to order you a token for this weekend? In case you want to log in to work on certain things as many people do?". This was already a red flag. 

4) I have to do overtime because of the deadlines, amount of work and processes. Deadlines are often unrealistic in light of the actual process and the amount of work makes it impossible to squeeze everything into a full 8 hour day....However, sometimes these meetings finish at 6pm and I'm left drafting the report at night and submitting on the same day at 10pm just to meet this internal requirement. ...I've had to cancel days off and move medical appointments on multiple occasions because of this. 

While everyone else was consciously assigned portfolios that do not entail back to back regulatory projects in one year, mine had a different mix and I can't turn any of these projects down because of the way portfolios were assigned...The only thing I can turn down are the internal projects anyone else can handle and they decided to dump those on me while other people of the same tenure have way more capacity. 

I really do not think the issue is me not being able to handle the pressurized environment...they're asking me to hand over my life to them when my role is a JUNIOR role 

I am addressing your post piecemeal:

1) Asking for feedback (anon or not) about your fellow colleagues can be standard practice in a lot of places. It is where I work. It sucks but I think it's just part of many jobs. I would not get too upset about this for this reason because I'm betting you will find it occuring elsewhere. 

2) The priority of any business is to make money. Employee mental health/wellness is a joke at most places in the US - companies pay lip service to it because it looks bad if they don't and it may attract/retain staff. Your current place is not so much not caring as they just don't see the point in playing into the facade that so many others do. Do these company actually care? No, not really. It's up to you to advocate for yourself for a healthy balance. Don't expect any company to do that for you because paying you as little as possible and/or working you get into the ground benefits them and their bottomline. And that's why it's called the bottomline, at the end of the day, that's what matters. Don't ever forget that.

3) Working overtime without additional compensation at your current job is a tacit expectation. It's unspoken and it's not said nor in writing but it's there. 

4) It's clear what is happening here. You're being expected to carry an insane amount of work that is incongruent with your current salary. Why? Because they can. They retain their senior employees but dump a ton on you because you're clearly a hard, diligent worker who will take it. Some places do this as a form of "hazing", where you are new and you have to earn your keep. It's toxic, sure, but not hugely unusual. I've been hazed before and it's not fun.

Your company is abusing your hard work ethic to do a crazy amount of work for a lesser salary and they will continue to do it if allowed. You have to advocate for yourself in any job, not just take what they give you and then re-arrange your life to suit it unless they are willing to compensate you properly for that.

My boss at my current job (and I work in a very toxic environment) told me she wanted me (and others) to go on-call on some of my days off. I said no, that wasn't possible, I was not made aware of that when hired, and that I couldn't do that. I'm a good, solid worker in a place with a severe shortage (even before COVID) and I don't work M-F which means if I am gone, she has to come in. She doesn't want that so I'm left alone.

Know your worth and don't let any company jerk you around like that. 

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Last week, I started sending my CV around and applying via LinkedIn etc. No response to this day. 

In the meantime, I'm now facing a situation at work where another ad-hoc project was assigned to me on Tuesday, when I already have projects ongoing, a third one starting in January in addition to BAU. The project they assigned me on Tuesday starts in January at a very critical stage of another project which will require my full attention. The worst part is my manager never discussed assigning this project to me. I found out via the project lead who said my managers volunteered me for this project. 

I therefore reached out to my manager (who should know my schedule) and told him I wouldn't be able to dedicate the required time for the project that they just assigned because of XYZ (and I included details of all projects ongoing). I was told not worry because they will work to delegate some of my work. This is highly untrue as they've told me this countless times and it never happened once. He said it should be "manageable" (which I can already assume it will be manageable if I put in overtime). 

Now, my issue is because the amount of work is unreasonable, I am unable to dedicate the proper time to each task, thus  this is affecting the quality of my work. As a result of this, it now looks as though I'm performing poorly. It doesn't help that we have this internal audit process which will raise literally anything as an issue. For instance, my work was marked as "partially effective" because I forgot a sentence in a free format document which incorporated a deck which included that very sentence. This document doesn't go anywhere and is only archived internally. So, it gives you an idea of what's happening.

It might be hazing but I've been with the company close to two years now. Also, if it were "hazing", how come the other new joiners aren't experiencing the same? I don't think this is "hazing" but more so being set up to fail because I've seen countless occasions where I was not informed of certain points which were crucial to certain projects I worked on and it later on led to issues that I couldn't have foreseen as again, the people in charge of delivering the information never did despite my various attempts at making sure everything was aligned. These people being my managers. I think they're drownings me under work to ensure I am struggling to perform my tasks adequately to then justify a performance issue to eventually get rid of me. 

It's a complete dystopian culture.

It's gotten to the point where I'm too anxious to have lunch and have lost quite a lot of weight as a result, and I have experienced severe insomnia for the first time in my career (I can't sleep before 1am and I always wake up in the middle of the night around 3/4am thinking / stressing about what's waiting for me at work when I get up). The situation is pretty critical. Again, it's not the first time in my career I'm working weekends or overtime. Every company will have a degree of toxicity, but this is not one I can bear. 

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I'm sorry you're struggling so much and even losing weight as a result! I'm glad you're looking for a new job but I repeat what everyone else has said: look everywhere, not just LinkedIn. You may need to be proactive and call to follow-up if you don't hear anything. I ended up doing this with a job ages ago - turns out the electronic system accidentally binned my application (because I didn't answer ONE arbitrary question in the way it wanted). I spoke to the manager who was hiring and she immediately had my application pulled up and I was hired same day. So yeah, I don't always trust electronic applications. Just my experience.

Not everyone is "hazed" at a job. I was hazed at the first job within my current role because I was brand spanking new (this was years ago) to the profession. Other, more experienced people joined after me and they were not hazed, only I was, but I felt it was because I was new. Not justifying, just explaining. 

Are people at your company pretty tight-knit and rather clique-ish? Yes, they may be wanting to run you off, etiher consciously or unconsciously. Say, they didn't feel you were a right fit for the company culture but they are too chicken s__t to come out and say that, opting to overwork you until you leave.

Keep looking! There are better jobs out there. 

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Thank you everyone, I really appreciate the kind advice!

It is true I have become overly reliant on LinkedIn because that's where I found my last two jobs (one through a recruiter and the other via a job post). Often times, the opportunities on LinkedIn are the same as those on Indeed, Glassdoor etc.. (for my industry at least). I have been in touch with a couple of recruiters who proactively approached me for roles and part of the applications submitted were through them. I've found recruiters to be quite flaky. I've deal with many many recruiters in my career (agencies) and they have a tendency to ghost candidates which makes it even more complicated. 

My CV is not perfect and certainly needs a lot of touching up as I'm not getting responses. I will look at it again over the weekend and during my upcoming days off. I always keep it up to date and proof-read it, but I recognize some sections might need revamping. Most days, I'm too exhausted to even think of applying to anything, but the situation is clearly going from bad to worse. 

As far as "hazing" goes - I was hired as an experienced hire with 5 years industry experience when I joined. My interview lasted 15 minutes with both managers which is odd for such a large institution. I put it down on the fact that I had prior experience with a competitor and a well-known consulting firm. Now I wonder if I should have taken this as a red flag during the recruitment process. 

The team is not great because there is no team spirit. I was on a performance call with my manager's manager a couple months ago and this person told me there was a strange dynamic in the team because the other two people in the team didn't get along (which is true and it actually instilled a bad energy to the point where both of them would take it out on me for no apparent reason). They're very cliquey and despite me trying to be extremely amenable, I simply don't feel a connection with them. I think the cliquey vibe comes from the top down. Our direct manager is "friends" with the two people in the team and often hangs out with them after work. We've been working remotely this whole time and the very first time we all went to the office together back in October, the manager went off to lunch with his "friends" (who are also his reports our team) and didn't even extend any invitation for me to join even though they bumped into me at the canteen. He also sat me down alone in the far back and the rest of them were all gathered together in another spot. 

I also need to stress the fact that I am the only female in this team , so all I am trying to do here is remain professional because I've had incidents with one guy from my team who kept texting me on Saturday or Sunday evenings to "chat" about non-work stuff. I never responded to any of his texts and ever since, I've been cordial and professional with everyone, but that's where it stops. 

My opinion is that the manager has an agenda and so does his own manager. To be honest, I'm the first one to say there is a huge culture clash. Their culture does not work for me and this is reflected in my work because I'm not thriving. As far as overworking me, I think based on my background, they probably assume I'm used to this pace (because I worked for employers which are known to be cut-throat), but I have to say, this is a different level which I suspect is on purpose. I am adamant they are deliberately dumping all ad-hoc internal projects on me whenever I have multiple large regulatory projects ongoing in an attempt to destabilize me. I remember someone who was working on a single regulatory project a couple months ago volunteered to work on an ad-hoc internal project and the manager said to this person they already had enough on their plate with the regulatory project, so they can sit this ad-hoc one out (written black on white on Teams). It is crystal clear they know what they are doing when they're throwing these ad-hoc projects at me because they're hoping I'll burn the candle at both ends and fall short of expectations on my main tasks. 

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I took a class in resume writing, and one thing that really stood out (and I had confirmed by several recruiters) is the mistake many people make in being far too "wordy". They write paragraphs and paragraphs that no one will ever read. They think it's better to include a lot of detail but again, no one who has several hundred resumes to review will read all of that.

I was advised to use bullet points with highlights. And don't provide a list of job duties. Bullet point what YOU PERSONALLY accomplished. They don't want a job description, they want to know your contributions and successes. And there's a thing called the "10 second rule", which is the amount of time a recruiter will spend looking at each resume before deciding whether to put it in the "yes", "no" or "maybe" stack. So keep that in mind. Capture their attention with a snappy format and you can give them the details when they interview you.

And yes, keep using multiple sources because you just never know. I had several interviews setup by one recruiter (and I didn't get any of those jobs) but my current job was marketed to me by a recruiter who found my resume on Indeed and whom I'd never communicated with prior to him reaching out to me. So, you never know.

I always felt that the mere act of actively job searching helped get me through rough days at the job I was wanting to leave.

I hope you are able to find something new soon. I feel confident you will.

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2 hours ago, boltnrun said:

I took a class in resume writing, and one thing that really stood out (and I had confirmed by several recruiters) is the mistake many people make in being far too "wordy". They write paragraphs and paragraphs that no one will ever read. They think it's better to include a lot of detail but again, no one who has several hundred resumes to review will read all of that.

I was advised to use bullet points with highlights. And don't provide a list of job duties. Bullet point what YOU PERSONALLY accomplished. They don't want a job description, they want to know your contributions and successes. And there's a thing called the "10 second rule", which is the amount of time a recruiter will spend looking at each resume before deciding whether to put it in the "yes", "no" or "maybe" stack. So keep that in mind. Capture their attention with a snappy format and you can give them the details when they interview you.

And yes, keep using multiple sources because you just never know. I had several interviews setup by one recruiter (and I didn't get any of those jobs) but my current job was marketed to me by a recruiter who found my resume on Indeed and whom I'd never communicated with prior to him reaching out to me. So, you never know.

I always felt that the mere act of actively job searching helped get me through rough days at the job I was wanting to leave.

I hope you are able to find something new soon. I feel confident you will.

Yes.  Very good advice on the bullet point/ten second approach.  I'll add think outside the box of traditional formats if your experiences don't fit.  Example - I worked at five companies in 15 years.  That could be seen as a lot of moves.  But three of those five moves was with my mentor- he moved and took me (and some colleagues/team members) with him. 

I knew with a ten second glance the impression would be "that's a lot of jobs, hmmmm"  So I had a separate section with bullet points above the job listings which provided that I was asked to move to 3 companies with my mentor and then listed my general skills and contributions that were true across all jobs I'd held.  After this front and center heading I then listed each job briefly.  

I personally think the section of "interests" is superfluous -if the interests are related to volunteer work, list the volunteer work.  I also am not a fan of the sort of banner or header which is supposed to sum up who you are -to me it comes across as too flashy/forced.  But different strokes!

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I agree with bolt - bullet points are the best. Definitely don't be too wordy or long, it will just make the reader bored and bin it.

My resume (well, one of them, I have a couple different resumes (i.e. different licenses, different role/job for each one, so depending on the job I'm applying for) is mostly bullet points under my past jobs and a bit about my education/licenses. Bullet points detail out my skills, certifications, brief 1 sentence about what I did at each job, etc.

I didn't think people actually put "interests" on resumes..! I've never done it. I actually think at least half of my interests would be major turn-offs. 

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10 minutes ago, Fudgie said:

I agree with bolt - bullet points are the best. Definitely don't be too wordy or long, it will just make the reader bored and bin it.

My resume (well, one of them, I have a couple different resumes (i.e. different licenses, different role/job for each one, so depending on the job I'm applying for) is mostly bullet points under my past jobs and a bit about my education/licenses. Bullet points detail out my skills, certifications, brief 1 sentence about what I did at each job, etc.

I didn't think people actually put "interests" on resumes..! I've never done it. I actually think at least half of my interests would be major turn-offs. 

I see it really often!  I don't like it either.  I don't have it on mine.  Impressive that you have individually tailored resumes.  I thought of doing that and .... I got tired just thinking about undertaking it!

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I actually had a paragraph-type resume. It was super long, and it got me 2 jobs!!

2.5 jobs, actually. One was part-time. Three, if you consider that the part-time guy hired me twice lol.

But last time around, I hired a resume writer and they sliced and diced my resume from four pages to two (it's so embarrassing to admit how long it was).

My resume is mostly bullet points now.* And that worked, too. It's how I got my current job. Frankly, I got a lot more hits after I hired the resume writer. It was like blood in the water in a shark tank.

_____________________________________________

*there are still some paragraphlike elements

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Thank you!

I think many very good points were touched up! Although CV is only one page, I have far too many bullet points under each job. I have "achievements" in there, but they are generally the last couple of bullet points after bullets that indeed look like a job description.

The thing is my previous jobs did not entail quantitative targets / objectives, so it is quite difficult to simply put achievements in there because it wouldn't give the reader much information on what the job was about and certainly wouldn't cover the full spectrum of technical knowledge acquired in those jobs. 

I personally do not have an "interests" section (never have because I find it useless), but I do have a small section which highlights my volunteer work. 

A couple months ago, I tried hiring a CV writer and got quotes from various companies, but I find them far too expensive (we're looking at upwards of £/€400). I'm sure it is worth the investment, but at this particular point, I'd rather save any money I can possibly save, because I have not guarantee having my CV professionally revamped will lead to immediate results. 

Actually, funny you mention hell @Jibralta because this is exactly the word I've been using the describe this company. It is the hell of corporations. 

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5 minutes ago, RuedeRivoli said:

I personally do not have an "interests" section (never have because I find it useless), but I do have a small section which highlights my volunteer work. 

I love this especially for you because I think especially with quantitative work and skills it shows that you're wide ranging in your skills and contributions (yes, even if the volunteer work is related to your work-work skill set but I'd venture a guess that it's distinct from that).  

I understand about the bullet points.  So, for free -have you ever asked a headhunter his/her opinion on how to get your accomplishments across in a resume given the nature of your work? I don't think you need to hire someone especially given your skill set.  What I mean is I'd think with your skill set you'd be really well-suited to being concrete and specific in a resume and structured.  The fact that you think an interests section is useless (me too!) tells me that your mindset is to present information in a non-fluff way and to stick to the facts.

Good luck in this coming week in Churchilling it out of there.

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35 minutes ago, RuedeRivoli said:

Actually, funny you mention hell @Jibralta because this is exactly the word I've been using the describe this company. It is the hell of corporations. 

I have been there!!!!

35 minutes ago, RuedeRivoli said:

I'm sure it is worth the investment, but at this particular point, I'd rather save any money I can possibly save, because I have not guarantee having my CV professionally revamped will lead to immediate results.

Well, just an FYI-- the $300 investment in my resume lead to a $21,000 raise! I did not expect that at all. I just wanted to get the F out of the hellhole I was in, and was willing to pay any price. So the extra $$ was a pretty nice perk.

I thought my self-written resume was pretty good. But the professional did a better job with the same information.

Just something to keep in mind. When you're in a sht situation, it's hard to imagine that any of your efforts will pay off. But they can. 

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1 hour ago, RuedeRivoli said:

my previous jobs did not entail quantitative targets / objectives, so it is quite difficult to simply put achievements in there because it wouldn't give the reader much information on what the job was about and certainly wouldn't cover the full spectrum of technical knowledge acquired in those jobs. 

But I'm sure you accomplished a lot in those jobs.  So you could bullet point what you did to meet the goals or assist the team in what the jobs required.  And technical knowledge you acquired is definitely a bullet point!  I learned a lot about how to use higher level Excel, for example, so one bullet point could be "increased Excel skills by utilizing macros, charts and formulas to compile and present weekly reports."  The recruiter will see "Boltnrun knows high-intermediate Excel.  This employer needs someone with that skill.  I'm putting Boltnrun into my 'want to interview' stack."

A job description type resume doesn't explain why or how you excelled in the job.  That's why it's important to leave that off and actually highlight what you specifically did that made you stand out.  If weekly reports were part of the job, what did you do to improve the process? How did you present the material?  What feedback did you get on those reports and what did your peers or superiors say about the information you presented?

Also, please do include a brief cover letter.  Mine highlighted my progression from floor worker to manager at my previous job, for example.  I also included accolades I received from upper management.

Remember, everyone submits a resume.  How can you make yours stand out from the crowd?

And finally, no cutesy graphics or fonts!  Less is more in this case.

I didn't pay anyone to help me write my resume.  There are plenty of examples online that you can use as guides.

Good luck, I feel you will be successful.

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I haven't paid for a resume review but one of my schools offered a resume clinic so I used that a couple times. It was really helpful. If I hadn't used that, I would have paid to have a review somewhere. Otherwise, I have spent a little money on some custom templates (made by someone who works in the same field as I do). They were very classy, efficient, and easy to edit so I didn't mind paying $20 for a pack of digital templates that I could use forever if I wanted to. 

Having a couple different resumes tailored for a certain "type" of job is a good idea and worth the effort. You can always tweak it a little bit if you'd like and don't forget the personalized cover letter. 

You can do so much better than this job. I'm sure you'll find something great. 

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If you have friends/acquaintances or even old colleagues that you know are really good at looking at CV or Resumes, I would message them for a favor. Another pair of eyes, the better.

Good to hear your actively searching. Your sanity and health are so more important than money or reputation. Be kind to yourself, Rue.

 

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