Jump to content

Cravings for alcohol


CrazyWife

Recommended Posts

On 7/22/2021 at 9:54 AM, Tinydance said:

One time I went to an AA meeting and I never "shared" or spoke to anyone at all in this meeting. At the end of the meeting a few women came straight up to me and a couple immediately said: "Can I have your phone number?" I panicked and gave my number to one or two of them.

I could be wrong but I knew someone a long time ago who went to AA and asking each other for their phone number seemed to be the norm - it apparently was part of the support system so members could support and help each other out.  Nothing more than that.  Nothing sinister. Not sure why it would be viewed as such a shocking thing to do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply
1 hour ago, CrazyWife said:

Alcoholism has now been more classed as a mental disorder by the DSM 5 (USA)

No. Alcoholism was officially classified as a physical disease by the American Medical Association in 1987. The AMA then subsequently endorsed the dual classification of alcoholism as both psychiatric and medical diseases by the International Classification of Diseases. It continues to be defined as both a physical and mental disease by ICD and the AMA. DSM–5 calls alcoholism "alcohol use disorder." The DSM classification doesn't supersede, contest, or negate the AMA classification or the ICD classification. It has nothing to do with them. 

1 hour ago, CrazyWife said:

But either way I am happy to be no longer involved with it and am going my own way. 

No argument there. It's your life to live.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Jibralta said:

No. Alcoholism was officially classified as a physical disease by the American Medical Association in 1987. The AMA then subsequently endorsed the dual classification of alcoholism as both psychiatric and medical diseases by the International Classification of Diseases. It continues to be defined as both a physical and mental disease by ICD and the AMA. DSM–5 calls alcoholism "alcohol use disorder." The DSM classification doesn't supersede, contest, or negate the AMA classification or the ICD classification. It has nothing to do with them. 

No argument there. It's your life to live.

Most medical professionals in psychiatry, like myself, use the term AUD and class it on a spectrum. It has largely been debated in psychiatry about it being a mental disorder or disease. Even nature vs nuture. Even the WHO were looking to declassify it as a disease. The medical model of disease is not set in stone as being the cause of 'alcoholism' or the now preferred term AUD. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, CrazyWife said:

It has largely been debated in psychiatry about it being a mental disorder or disease.

Medical professionals in psychiatry can debate all night long about whether it's mental disorder or disease, and you can call it Purple if you want. It doesn't change the AMA or the ICD classification, and it doesn't solve your drinking problem. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jibralta said:

Medical professionals in psychiatry can debate all night long about whether it's mental disorder or disease, and you can call it Purple if you want. It doesn't change the AMA or the ICD classification, and it doesn't solve your drinking problem. 

Yeah true. As a friend told me 'doesn't matter how you got it, as long as you admit you have a problem'. I've had AUD for a long time and now been sober for a while. But it's a constant battle. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I don't have a problem"  "I am not an addict"  "I have it under control" "I am not a Alcoholic"

Identifying the cause of any problem is the first step in solving the problem.   It appears to me that you have indeed identified the problem but still think you are in control, not the alcohol.  This is the dangerous thing all people with a "drinking problem" face.

  I am hopeful for you and in my experience think you have a good chance at staying sober and clean in the long run.  To be frank here I do think you will relapse once or twice before you finally embrace the solution what ever that may be for you but in the end I feel like you can do it.

  This thread has brought back a lot of memories for me, some good but mostly bad.  I tried my best for my father but in the end it was always his choice.  I am now 5 years older than he was when he died and all I can think about is how much more life he had in front of him, how much time we had together that never happened.

  I see you as a Go It Alone type, I hope I am wrong.  Let the people that love you in.  They will love you more for trusting them and just having them at your side is more help than you can imagine.

 This will be my last post on this thread as I have said all there is to say.  If you run into trouble you can always PM me.

Lost

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...