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Am I the only one who hates texting?


jul-els
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It's so cold and impersonal. Like two robots talking to each other. Which is what it is. Two people talking through robot translators. I think it's good for relaying small bits of pertinent information, i.e., I'm on my way, do you need anything at the store, what time is the such and such happening, what's the address, etc. But trying to have an actual conversation on it just leaves me so cold. I try to spice it up with emojis and punctuation, but that probably just comes across as annoying. I try to avoid text conversations, but they seem to be all the vogue these days. I'm stuck in a world of people that don't want to talk to each other, they just want to press buttons to do their talking for them. Depressing. Anyway, that's my two cents. Anyone else feel the same way? Or maybe you love texting. Why? I'd like to hear opinions.

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I agree. I simply don't text anyone, unless it's about logistics, etc. I can't stand that it's become the norm.

 

What strikes me as most odd is, at my age (late 50's), the number of men who want to use text as their primary/only form of communication. I more understand when young people text a lot, as they grew up with screens, but these are old men. Literally, grandpa's.

 

I just think it's so much of the "hide-behind-the-screen" mentality.

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I don't hate texting but I do agree it has replaced actual phone conversations and even face to face conversations. So many times on here there is someone asking for help deciphering a text as what did they mean by this or that when a voice conversation would hardly ever bring that about.

 

I also agree that people hide behind the screen. I am 55 and if I have messaged a woman on match back and forth a few times I tell them that I prefer to get to know someone by speaking on the phone instead of messaging on the app or texting. In almost all cases the woman welcome my suggestion and appreciate my willingness to talk voice to voice. Of course there have been several times when I suggest talking on the phone where they disappear so it can help weed out cat fishers and women that are only luke warm on me.

 

Texting some long winded message is not me unless I know the person is busy and I want them to see it when they have a chance and then get back to me.

 

Hitting that little phone icon is much easier...

 

Lost

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For some people, texting is a useful way to interact. I have challenges identifying and speaking the right word, but I can type it without delay. It is one impact of an adhd brain.

 

A small example of my larger point - it is a tool. Some people use it some people don't. Try to do what works for you without judging what work for others.

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I agree, with caveats.

 

I like words, like playing with them, like communicating with them in written form. So I am, if you'll excuse some immodesty, a "good" and "skilled" texter. I can have some fun banters in pixels, be it on dating app, with a faraway friend, with my girlfriend, or (pulling from last night's footage) with my mother, where we live texted a bit throughout the presidential debates.

 

But all of that pales to the glories of good ol' fashioned 3D communication, with eyes, bodies, voices, gestures, where as much can be "said" in shared silences than through filling silences (and quelling boredom) with noise. I place little value on texts, be they poetic or curt. I don't gauge relationships, romantic or platonic or familial, through texts, text frequency, and so on. I'm pretty analog, at the end of the day.

 

I do hate emojis. They just don't resonate with me. I never use them, preferring to actually type out "fire emoji" than finding them flame to winkingly connote "lit." Heart emojis leave me cold, and I'm lucky to have my heart invested in someone who feels the same way: we'd rather search for the four to twelve words to describe how we're feeling than the pixilated symbol deployed every second by a billion or souls across the globe. Or, better yet, wait until we're face to face.

 

Blah blah. I'm rambling. Yeah, it's pretty boring, texting, for the most part. I agree with LH that there is a lot of hiding behind screens these days—but also, to add to that, that people use screens a bit too much to affirm their existence. "I'm heading to the store to buy toilet paper..." "I'm thinking of watching Game of Thrones or maybe Mad Men..." "I"m stuck in traffic..." And so on: I think people like shooting these things out to enjoy a hit of being "heard" and "seen," the subtext to all that basically being: "Hey, I am alive." Pretty human, even sweet, if clumsy and tedious in execution.

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Agree. Don't hate it but prefer it for brief or practical communication or sharing links, etc. to having any sort of in depth or extended conversation. Too much room for misinterpretation.

I think it's good for relaying small bits of pertinent information, i.e., I'm on my way, do you need anything at the store, what time is the such and such happening, what's the address, etc. But trying to have an actual conversation on it just leaves me so cold.
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For some people, texting is a useful way to interact. I have challenges identifying and speaking the right word, but I can type it without delay. It is one impact of an adhd brain.

 

A small example of my larger point - it is a tool. Some people use it some people don't. Try to do what works for you without judging what work for others.

 

Not judging. Just giving my opinion and asking for others. Which brings up another point. It's easier to misunderstand someone's point through texting also, I think. Due to lack of tone inflection and also due the possibility of the recipient cherry picking which parts of the message they want to read.

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I don’t hate texting, but I dislike when someone wants to text about a topic that clearly should be discussed over the phone, or in person.

 

And by no means should anyone be relying on texting to get to know someone, or connect on a deeper level, but unfortunately I think a lot of people do text for this exact reason, which in the end only creates more of a disconnect, ironically.

 

A lot of people feel safer hiding behind their phone/keyboard, but jeez it’s unattractive...

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"Texting is bad" says a bunch of people on a forum saying things with text...

 

Man what a bunch of wet blankets. *

 

Texting is what you make of it. There are things it's good at and thing's it's bad at. It's good for things like don't forget the milk, sending supportive messages (good luck on your presentation, looking forward to seeing you tonight etc), or playful banter times when you are both stuck somewhere but have the time to waste. It's bad for discussing deep things or reevaluating a relationship. Don't try to "make points" over text!

 

And it's a bit silly if you are in a situation where better options are available - if you can make a phone call that's probably better. If you can meet in person do that.

 

Basically, if the conversation would kind of work if one side didn't send anything back, texting is fine for that. And can add something of value that you can't get otherwise.

 

* I kid. If it's not for you it's not for you (emoji smile)

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"Texting is bad" says a bunch of people on a forum saying things with text...

 

Man what a bunch of wet blankets. *

 

Texting is what you make of it. There are things it's good at and thing's it's bad at. It's good for things like don't forget the milk, sending supportive messages (good luck on your presentation, looking forward to seeing you tonight etc), or playful banter times when you are both stuck somewhere but have the time to waste. It's bad for discussing deep things or reevaluating a relationship. Don't try to "make points" over text!

 

And it's a bit silly if you are in a situation where better options are available - if you can make a phone call that's probably better. If you can meet in person do that.

 

Basically, if the conversation would kind of work if one side didn't send anything back, texting is fine for that. And can add something of value that you can't get otherwise.

 

* I kid. If it's not for you it's not for you (emoji smile)

 

Good, bad, whatever. I didn't say it was bad. It's good for some things. I just don't like it. I find it to be depressing most of the time. Maybe because it didn't exist until I was well into adulthood. I miss the days when you didn't talk to someone until you got home. I felt more connected to people in those days. I feel it's because we didn't take for granted the time we had to connect with each other. It was something we looked forward to and it happened in it's own time and place. Now it's 24/7. Feels like overkill, imo. Gets to the point where I just want to be left alone. That's what I find depressing about it, personally speaking.

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Is this a general frustration, or a generally frustration being voiced regarding something specific in your life?

 

Just a general disappointment with the mechanization of humanity in general. That’s not really new, though. I spent a ton of time glued to the tv as a kid. But I also spent an equal amount of time playing outside with my friends. I don’t think a lot of kids today have that. They spend all of their time in front of a screen. And it’s only going to get more pervasive as time goes on.

Edited by jul-els
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Not judging. Just giving my opinion and asking for others. Which brings up another point. It's easier to misunderstand someone's point through texting also, I think. Due to lack of tone inflection and also due the possibility of the recipient cherry picking which parts of the message they want to read.

 

hsha no you didn't judge.some do; you didn't

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I appreciate the usefulness of texting. Let's face it, texting is great for when a phone call is not really warranted. Examples: "Have I left my jacket at your place?", "My friend, how about meeting tomorrow for breakfast at 8 AM?", "Have you received the document I sent you earlier?", "Good luck tomorrow!", etc. Also, when you need specific information from chatterboxes, texting is the way to go.

 

By the way, texting language such as "CU" irks me! Please, spell out words. How difficult is it to type "See you." And please don't text me a string of emojis so I have to decipher what you are trying to say. Also, emojis do not replace letters of the alphabet. Okay, rant over. Surely, I enjoy using emojis but sparingly. Perhaps a smiley after wishing someone a good day, a party hat for when it's your birthday; stuff like that.

 

Otherwise, I am a huge fan and advocate of face-to-face conversations or, when that's not possible, phone/video calls. Alternatively, email me or write me a letter as I enjoy receiving those.

 

 

Edited to say: Keyboard activists irk me as well. The harsh comments I see on social media written by keyboard activists who wouldn't even dare to speak up in person. What's up with that trend?

Edited by greendots
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For some people, texting is a useful way to interact. I have challenges identifying and speaking the right word, but I can type it without delay. It is one impact of an adhd brain.

 

A small example of my larger point - it is a tool. Some people use it some people don't. Try to do what works for you without judging what work for others.

 

Absolutely agree, and have said before, there are some people, perhaps even many people, who communicate better in writing.

 

I suck at expressing myself verbally. Don't know why but I always have. In person I am better, but on the phone? No thank you, yawn.

 

I love writing and am able to express myself quite well via the written word, and have had some lovely conversations with people, local and long distance via email and messaging.

 

I don't judge those who prefer talking on phone, and would appreciate others not judging and interjecting such negativity like it's "lazy" or "hiding behind a screen" etc.

 

People forget, there is a real live person communicating with you "behind that screen" with emotions and feelings, not some robot.

 

Back in the day, people used to communicate quite well through letter writing, it's become a lost art in many respects.

Edited by katrina1980
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It's easier to misunderstand someone's point through texting also, I think. Due to lack of tone inflection and also due the possibility of the recipient cherry picking which parts of the message they want to read.

 

That's what emojis are for. :p lol

 

But yeah, if one or both don't have the ability to communicate clearly and articulately, that can certainly happen and yes it's frustrating.

 

But for two people who have some command of the language they're communicating in, it shouldn't be an issue, at least it hasn't been for me.

 

Honestly and truly, I cannot stand talking on the phone.

 

I have to sometimes, with my brothers, but I much prefer email.

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This is why I hate the phone.

 

I am recalling a recent conversation I was having on the phone with a friend of mine, she kept interrupting me, I don't recall even once being allowed to finish a complete thought!

 

And it wasn't like I was hesitating, struggling with what to say, she just kept interrupting and it became so frustrating I finally blurted out "may I finish my thought please"?

 

Then she got testy and the entire convo was an epic fail.

 

We decided from then on to text or email. That way, we can each finish our respective thought(s), send the text or email, the other can read, and respond.

 

Then there are those who will monopolize the entire convo never letting me get a word in, ugh.

 

I actually find talking on phone to be lazy. With messaging you have to articulate your thought, structure the sentence so it makes sense to the other versus sounding like meaningless jibber jabber, plus you have a record/memory of the exchange which may come in handy later or like with me and my bf, I like referring back to his messages when he's not around, he is very funny and they always make me chuckle and bring a smile to my face.

 

You can't do that when you talk on phone unless you're recording the calls.

 

JMO!! :D

Edited by katrina1980
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It's so cold and impersonal. Like two robots talking to each other. Which is what it is. Two people talking through robot translators. I think it's good for relaying small bits of pertinent information, i.e., I'm on my way, do you need anything at the store, what time is the such and such happening, what's the address, etc. But trying to have an actual conversation on it just leaves me so cold. I try to spice it up with emojis and punctuation, but that probably just comes across as annoying. I try to avoid text conversations, but they seem to be all the vogue these days. I'm stuck in a world of people that don't want to talk to each other, they just want to press buttons to do their talking for them. Depressing. Anyway, that's my two cents. Anyone else feel the same way? Or maybe you love texting. Why? I'd like to hear opinions.

 

I'm not much of a phone-talker, so I actually prefer texting!

 

However, there are certain situations where texting (and even emailing) is just stupid and it's faster to pick up the phone or meet with someone.

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