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Jibralta
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I came across these three wonderful films on Amazon, by Jean Aspen and Tom Irons. They are compilations of a family's photographs and film about building and staying in a cabin in the arctic wilderness.

In chronological order, they are: Arctic Son: Fulfilling the Dream (2013), Arctic Daughter: A Lifetime of Wilderness (2018), and ReWilding Kernwood (2019). They are very simply made, no bells and whistles. Yet they are all beautiful films and I keep finding myself at the edge of tears as I watch.

Jean Aspen is the daughter of explorers. She first visited the arctic with them when she was a small child. Her parents divorced, and when she and her sister were about 14, her mom took them back to the arctic to spend a summer. When she was in her early 20s, Jean returned again to the arctic with her then-boyfriend and built a cabin with him. They stayed in it for at least one winter.

She returned for a fourth time with her husband and young son. Along with a friend, they built another cabin, which they returned to frequently over the years. 

I'm about midway through the last film right now. I've been watching it slowly, over the course of two weeks, because I don't want it to end. It is so beautiful.

There's so much I'd like to write about it, but I can't find the words. I highly recommend these movies to anyone who likes watching these sorts of films. They really make you think.

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When I was in my early 20s, I took a Hebrew class at a local synagogue. I'm not Jewish, I've just always had an interest in languages. 

The teacher was a rabbi named Shlomo (westernized as Solomon). He was a young guy, originally from an Orthodox Jewish community in Ohio. 

The class was offered in the evenings. I was one of five students. The other four were older married couples in their 50s and 60s. Two of them actually lived down the street from me, and we always waved to each other after that.

I don't remember exactly how long the class was. It wasn't long enough for us to become conversational, but we did learn the alphabet, and we were able to read, speak, and understand the  sentences in our reader. 

I was the only non-Jew, but it wasn't a big deal. I just lacked some background that the other students had because I never went to temple and didn't have the same exposure to the language. I knew, for example, what the alphabet looked like, and that sentences were read from right to left. But there were some very interesting things that I didn't know.

For example, there are no vowels or upper and lowercase letters. Vowel indications (called "niqqud") started to be added in the Middle Ages to preserve pronunciation and to help people learn the language.

In its purest form, the Hebrew language looks like this: SY NGH T RD F YR FMLR WTH TH LNGG BT F Y DNT KNW TH LNGG Y WLL B CHLLNGD.

That's, EASY ENOUGH TO READ IF YOU'RE FAMILIAR WITH THE LANGUAGE, BUT IF YOU DON'T KNOW THE LANGUAGE, YOU WILL BE CHALLENGED.

Shlomo showed us some texts where even the spaces between words had been eliminated, where there wasn't even punctuation. Literally walls of text: SYNGHTRDFYRFMLRWTHTHLNGGBTFYDNTKNWTHLNGGYWLLBCHLLNGDSYNGHTRDFYRFMLRWTHTHLNGGBTFYDNTKNWTHLNGGYWLLBCHLLNGDSYNGHTRDFYRFMLRWTHTHLNGGBTFYDNTKNWTHLNGGYWLLBCHLLNGDSYNGHTRDFYRFMLRWTHTHLNGGBTFYDNTKNWTHLNGGYWLLBCHLLNGDSYNGHTRDFYRFMLRWTHTHLNGGBTFYDNTKNWTHLNGGYWLLBCHLLNGD

Fortunately, our class learned Hebrew with niqqud 😅 

I have a very funny, but unfortunately very esoteric story from that class. I don't know if I can successfully convey the humor of it, but here goes. Tip: try pronouncing the Hebrew words as you see them:

As I mentioned earlier, everyone in the class was Jewish except for me. Shlomo was a Rabbi, and the other four had gone to Hebrew school in their youth.

All of my classmates were familiar with the term, "Adonai," which is used in place of Yahweh (Jehovah/God) out of respect. Shlomo taught us the written form of Adonai. He also showed us an abbreviation that was sometimes used for God, called a gershayim, which looks like double apostrophes (''). But one of my classmates--the grumpiest old man--wasn't paying attention during that lesson. In fact, he seemed to tune out most of the curriculum. 

One day, Shlomo brought in some food. We all took turns reading a prayer out of the textbook. When it came time for Mr. Grump to read a passage, he had a hard time. And you could tell that he felt very self conscious reading in front of everybody. Eventually, he completely faltered at a gershayim. He turned to Shlomo and demanded, "What is that? How am I supposed to pronounce two apostrophes?" Shlomo said, "Adonai." Exasperated, Mr. Grumpy said, "Well if you don't know what it is, how am I supposed to know?"

🤣🤣🤣

True story.

ANYHOO, the whole reason I bring this up is that I came upon this video today and became unexpectedly engrossed by this charming old scholar's explanation of ancient cuneiform writing. I have no idea what made me click on it. And never in a million years did I expect to be nailed to my chair watching a video on this topic. But... it happened. And as I watched, I remembered the class I took 20+ years ago and understood why Hebrew is the way that it is. 

 

 

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I just finished watching a documentary called My Name is Salt. It took quite a while to watch, because it's not the most exciting film in the world. It documents the eight-month long monotony of harvesting salt from a desert by hand. The process is thousands of years old. With the exception of diesel-powered pumps, it  is very much the same now as it was a thousand years ago.

Entire families move to the desert to help with the harvest. They live in tents without electricity, and it is clear that they are poor. There is an inclination for outsiders to categorize them as "exploited" or "disadvantaged." But I think it is important to recognize the ethnocentrism of that view. They aren't idiots. They are extremally capable people. This is their life, this is how their families come together, and they find meaning and purpose in their work just like everybody else. 

The land that they work in is vast and barren. When they first arrive, they dig up tools that they buried the year before and dig deep wells until they find water. This water--salt water--is pumped into flat beds where it is painstakingly pounded by foot and raked for the better part of the year until the pumps are turned off and it is finally allowed to dry. The people who do this work with centuries of knowledge under their belts, passed down from countless generations.

What I found fascinating, besides the depth of knowledge, is the harmony between the harvesting process and the ecosystem. This desert is also a salt marsh. In April, the harvest is completed, the people pack up and leave, and the area is completely inundated by monsoons until it becomes a shallow sea.

The floodwaters link up to the sea, and I think that is where the salt comes in. Shrimp also come in, and they are harvested at the end of the monsoon season--which explains the boats that you see in the beginning and end of the film. I suppose the water is finally  absorbed into the desert, and that it is this water which gets pumped back out when the families return the next year.

It strikes me as a profound cycle that takes great wisdom and intelligence to recognize and tap into. If all people were able to do this, we would have harmony instead of conflict. For that reason, I find it ironic that, looking in from the outside, we see poverty instead of wealth. 

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On 3/7/2022 at 7:10 AM, Jibralta said:

I came across these three wonderful films on Amazon, by Jean Aspen and Tom Irons. They are compilations of a family's photographs and film about building and staying in a cabin in the arctic wilderness.

In chronological order, they are: Arctic Son: Fulfilling the Dream (2013), Arctic Daughter: A Lifetime of Wilderness (2018), and ReWilding Kernwood (2019). They are very simply made, no bells and whistles. Yet they are all beautiful films and I keep finding myself at the edge of tears as I watch.

Jean Aspen is the daughter of explorers. She first visited the arctic with them when she was a small child. Her parents divorced, and when she and her sister were about 14, her mom took them back to the arctic to spend a summer. When she was in her early 20s, Jean returned again to the arctic with her then-boyfriend and built a cabin with him. They stayed in it for at least one winter.

She returned for a fourth time with her husband and young son. Along with a friend, they built another cabin, which they returned to frequently over the years. 

I'm about midway through the last film right now. I've been watching it slowly, over the course of two weeks, because I don't want it to end. It is so beautiful.

There's so much I'd like to write about it, but I can't find the words. I highly recommend these movies to anyone who likes watching these sorts of films. They really make you think.

The arctic is magical.

Harsh and unforgiving, but magical. Out oldest just finished reading Call of the Wild and he read several parts out loud to me. I love the author's background and how he used his real life experiences to create a masterpiece of truth.

And I love how it showed certain kinds of people could never make it there. The reality was so stark, as you read the different ways people die mostly due to their ignorance and lack of being prepared.

Maybe it's because we're a survivalist family 😁 I don't know, but my son and I loved it!

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I recently reread White Fang for the 11 billionth time. I bought that one and Call of the Wild through the Scholastic Book Club when I was in elementary school and still have both books in my possession. I googled Jack London a couple of years ago and learned that he developed a reputation for plagiarism. Not terribly surprising, considering how hot the dime novel market was in that day. Everyone and their grandfather was writing one, and there were only a limited number of frontier tales to be told.

On 3/9/2022 at 2:42 PM, maritalbliss86 said:

And I love how it showed certain kinds of people could never make it there. The reality was so stark, as you read the different ways people die mostly due to their ignorance and lack of being prepared.

Jack London was one of the many who were not tough enough to make it out there, but it definitely inspired this writing. 

One of the things that struck me about the Jean Aspen documentaries was the change in attitude towards the arctic over 30 years. They don't go into much detail about it in the films, but you notice it. For example, the first film took place in 1992. When the family left the cabin, they left instructions on the door in case a traveler found his or herself stranded. But in the second film, which took place 20 years later, there was a "Private Property" sign on their cabin. The wilderness was becoming overrun with hunters who viewed the arctic as their amusement park, and who eyed the family's cabin as if it were an amenity.

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I just watched a documentary called Queen of Versailles. It's about the ultrawealthy Siegel family, who experiences a financial crisis in the wake of the 2008 subprime mortgage crash. I think the documentary was originally supposed to be about the construction of a new house, touted as the biggest home in America. In the first 20 minutes or so, you see the family at their pinnacle. The household (with its eight children and extreme excesses) is running smoothly, there's no tension in the marriage. There is only a brief hint at trouble when the husband, David Siegel, flirts pretty inappropriately with a 20-y.o. beauty queen.

They cut to the wife, Jackie, joking that David is going to trade her in for two 20-y.o.s now that she's 40 (David is 70). The housekeeper talks about how well David runs the household, how he always knows exactly what's going on, knows where every cent is going. You can see on her face that her admiration is genuine. Then the market crashes and the subprime mortgages bites the Siegel family right in the ass--David runs a timeshare company, and it's all subprime mortgages. 

The documentary is very good in the way that it portrays the unravelling of this family. It is so gradual that you hardly realize what's happening. It's also really good at showing you how predatory the banks are. Prevailing opinion tends to be that banks don't want to get 'stuck' with the building; they just want the money. But this documentary shows that there are cases where they do want the building very much, and you get a glimpse of some of the tricks they use to achieve their ends. David appears up to the challenge. For example, when the bank refused to let him make an interest-only payment on an $11,000 mortgage, he went and found his mortgage on the secondary market and purchased it for $3,200. That made me really freaking happy.

As the documentary progresses, the Siegels are slowly and unwittingly crushed by their excessive lifestyle. Instead of downsizing their living quarters, they hunker down in their 42(?)-room mansion as David struggles to get out from under his mortgages. Their household staff is cut from something like 26 employees to four nannies and a housekeeper. The remaining staff is overwhelmed by the workload. The home is filthy. David keeps the true depths of their financial struggles a secret from Jackie, and he grows more and more withdrawn and resentful of his oblivious wife. 

The opulence of their lifestyle often makes their struggles seem absurd. Seven thousand of their employees lost their jobs, but the Siegels' big problem is holding on to two mega mansions and a tower in Vegas. The Siegels are by no means hateful or mean people. They are, in fact, ordinary people with ordinary strengths and shortcomings. But they don't come out looking very good by the end of the film.

After the film was released, David sued the filmmakers for defamation. He thought the film would be about the house (like me!), not about the floundering business and the family's adjustments. Jackie was more philosophical about the whole thing. The lawsuit proved unsuccessful, and I think that was probably the correct decision. The film doesn't come off as an attack on the business or on the Siegels. It simply captured the "us and them" mentality of the ultrawealthy, how wealth and power protects itself, and how disconnected wealthy people can become.

For the Siegels, the repercussions of the financial crisis and the film culminated a few years after the film was released. Their eldest daughter, Victoria, long bullied by classmates, died of a drug overdose. I learned this after googling. I felt so sad, because she was such a cool kid. She was interviewed several times during the documentary's 2-year filming, starting when she was 12. The last time she appeared, she was 14, taller and thinner. She stormed into her dad's den and lectured him for being a grouch and for snapping at her mom. She seemed a sweet, heroic kind of kid. 

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18 hours ago, Jibralta said:

I just watched a documentary called Queen of Versailles. It's about the ultrawealthy Siegel family, who experiences a financial crisis in the wake of the 2008 subprime mortgage crash. I think the documentary was originally supposed to be about the construction of a new house, touted as the biggest home in America. In the first 20 minutes or so, you see the family at their pinnacle. The household (with its eight children and extreme excesses) is running smoothly, there's no tension in the marriage. There is only a brief hint at trouble when the husband, David Siegel, flirts pretty inappropriately with a 20-y.o. beauty queen.

They cut to the wife, Jackie, joking that David is going to trade her in for two 20-y.o.s now that she's 40 (David is 70). The housekeeper talks about how well David runs the household, how he always knows exactly what's going on, knows where every cent is going. You can see on her face that her admiration is genuine. Then the market crashes and the subprime mortgages bites the Siegel family right in the ass--David runs a timeshare company, and it's all subprime mortgages. 

The documentary is very good in the way that it portrays the unravelling of this family. It is so gradual that you hardly realize what's happening. It's also really good at showing you how predatory the banks are. Prevailing opinion tends to be that banks don't want to get 'stuck' with the building; they just want the money. But this documentary shows that there are cases where they do want the building very much, and you get a glimpse of some of the tricks they use to achieve their ends. David appears up to the challenge. For example, when the bank refused to let him make an interest-only payment on an $11,000 mortgage, he went and found his mortgage on the secondary market and purchased it for $3,200. That made me really freaking happy.

As the documentary progresses, the Siegels are slowly and unwittingly crushed by their excessive lifestyle. Instead of downsizing their living quarters, they hunker down in their 42(?)-room mansion as David struggles to get out from under his mortgages. Their household staff is cut from something like 26 employees to four nannies and a housekeeper. The remaining staff is overwhelmed by the workload. The home is filthy. David keeps the true depths of their financial struggles a secret from Jackie, and he grows more and more withdrawn and resentful of his oblivious wife. 

The opulence of their lifestyle often makes their struggles seem absurd. Seven thousand of their employees lost their jobs, but the Siegels' big problem is holding on to two mega mansions and a tower in Vegas. The Siegels are by no means hateful or mean people. They are, in fact, ordinary people with ordinary strengths and shortcomings. But they don't come out looking very good by the end of the film.

After the film was released, David sued the filmmakers for defamation. He thought the film would be about the house (like me!), not about the floundering business and the family's adjustments. Jackie was more philosophical about the whole thing. The lawsuit proved unsuccessful, and I think that was probably the correct decision. The film doesn't come off as an attack on the business or on the Siegels. It simply captured the "us and them" mentality of the ultrawealthy, how wealth and power protects itself, and how disconnected wealthy people can become.

For the Siegels, the repercussions of the financial crisis and the film culminated a few years after the film was released. Their eldest daughter, Victoria, long bullied by classmates, died of a drug overdose. I learned this after googling. I felt so sad, because she was such a cool kid. She was interviewed several times during the documentary's 2-year filming, starting when she was 12. The last time she appeared, she was 14, taller and thinner. She stormed into her dad's den and lectured him for being a grouch and for snapping at her mom. She seemed a sweet, heroic kind of kid. 

Hey Jib!

 

I watched this way back when it first aired and have since probably watched it another two times! I found it so fascinating, kind of in a car crash way as well. 
 

We know people who are mega rich like this, billionaires, and people always say to me but, why have they got a mortgage on their homes? Why wouldn’t they just buy it all cash? And it’s sometimes hard to explain that it is assets that make you money, not the money. He wants to put as much cash into his business as possible and he stretches himself. And of course the banks will always, rather have your assets and house. In fact, there is an argument against savings now. It is much more safe, and lucrative, to buy a house now instead of keeping 300k in the bank to brood.

 

I remember turning to my husband when I was watching it and saying, “do you think he’ll go bust?” And he laughed and said, “People like him never go bust.” And this is true. All his people and employees, they all lose, and he may have to get rid of a building or two but the family themselves will never be on the sidewalk with their hand around a cup. I never properly looked into it but didn’t he somehow manage to turn it all around? I didn’t warm to him at all by the way but I found the whole thing amazing to watch. I have also never seen a more ugly and tacky taste that is so expensive. They were buying mostly reproduction stuff when they could’ve had the actual real deal antiques. A bit like Michael Jackson shopping in those terrible gaudy faux antique shops in Vegas.

 

Between the Google and Timeshare King it looks like we have been likin’ a lot of the same kind of stuff Jib!

 

x
 

 

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47 minutes ago, mylolita said:

I never properly looked into it but didn’t he somehow manage to turn it all around?

Yes. You start to see how clever he is when he buys his own mortgage back at 30% of its value. It made me realize that he didn't have all those millions for no reason. He just got blindsided--as he put it, "addicted to cheap money"--not realizing that he was the getting cheap money because the banks had lowered their lending standards. But he caught on really fast and he held on. He says he's doing better than ever. His company is private, so nobody knows what it's worth now. But they got to keep both their houses. And they still live in tacky splendor😂

58 minutes ago, Batya33 said:

That's so very sad about Victoria!!

Yeah😔

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1 minute ago, Jibralta said:

Yes. You start to see how clever he is when he buys his own mortgage back at 30% of its value. It made me realize that he didn't have all those millions for no reason. He just got blindsided--as he put it, "addicted to cheap money"--not realizing that he was the getting cheap money because the banks had lowered their lending standards. But he caught on really fast and he held on. He says he's doing better than ever. His company is private, so nobody knows what it's worth now. But they got to keep both their houses. And they still live in tacky splendor😂

Yeah😔

He is very shrewd and very clever! And yes, gotta say good on them for their tacky splendour LOL! It’s a look! 🤣🤣🤣

 

Yes Victoria! Have you seen them now campaigning for a certain life saving adrenaline drug to be made cheap and available in every household if anyone has a drug overdose? They state it could have saved their daughter and probably would have. I can’t remember the name but I saw them addressing sectors of the government about it and they put their argument across very well, considering how tragic and painful it will be for them.

 

Sometimes you wonder, all those kids and all that time put into making money, he had no time for them much, you do wonder if her fate would have been different if they had paid attention more, and given more support; and known their daughter? I realise this sounds very harsh and I obviously don’t know the ins and outs but gut feeling, they seemed wrapped up in a whole load of other things and quality time doesn’t seem to have been spent. She seemed unhappy. It’s very tragic.

 

x

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1 hour ago, mylolita said:

Have you seen them now campaigning for a certain life saving adrenaline drug to be made cheap and available in every household if anyone has a drug overdose?

I think I heard about that drug from another documentary a couple of years ago. It was about an opiate epidemic in a tiny Appalachian town. All of the local cops carried a dose on them during their shifts. When I started googling after the movie, I read an article that said the Siegels had some part in making that drug available. It does save lives, but unfortunately it doesn't heal the epidemic. They end up using it repeatedly on the same people. 

1 hour ago, mylolita said:

they seemed wrapped up in a whole load of other things and quality time doesn’t seem to have been spent.

They certainly seem to prioritize quantity over quality. It was like they were on a relentless treadmill of more, more, more. When the filmmaker asked David why he was building such a massive house, he said, "Because I can." Later, Debbie said, "I had all of these children because I could." The idea dawned on me more than once that they are actually hoarders.

But of course, it's far too easy to make these broad generalizations about people I don't know, based on two hours' worth of moments extracted over the course of two years... What would my life come out looking like if someone filmed and distilled it like that? Yikes.... 🤫

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2 hours ago, mylolita said:

Timeshare King

You know, my mom and my sister would have gotten snared by of those timeshare schemes if I hadn't been there with them at the time. We have two perfectly wonderful timeshares a block away from the ocean, in a bustling little town center, owned free and clear for 25 years. It's an older building, but who cares? The location is prime and the yearly maintenance costs are inexpensive.

One year, for shts and giggles, we decided to tour a nearby timeshare building. They were offering some incentive, probably a free meal. And we were curious to see what else was around. So, we signed up. The building was really nice and the unit was beautifully appointed (although the finishes were a little dark for my tastes).

The guy told us the cost--five times what we paid for one of the units we already owned, plus an exorbitant annual maintenance cost. My mom and my sister both looked at me with dollar signs in their eyes. I had the most cash in the bank and could have bought the thing outright. I said, "No way." My mom and my sister pleaded. The salesguy pleaded. But I remained an ornery, ironclad btch.

Yeah, this thing was in a newer building with a fancy lobby and newer finishes and nicer furniture, but it was four blocks away from the beach, in the middle of nowhere, with no views. Why would I pay that much to vacation in a cave when I could vacation in a pretty little paradise for peanuts? Not worth the money.

My mom and my sister teased me about my 'cheapness' for a while, but deep down they were glad that I held out. Honestly, I think they were more carried away by the fact that we could afford it than they were with the unit itself. People get crazy like that--same mentality as in the film: "because we can." We never went to one of those tours again.

When they explained the workings of David's timeshare empire in Queen of Versailles, I breathed a deep sigh of relief!!!

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After I lost my job in March 2020, I collected unemployment until the end of May 2020. I started a new job in June of 2020 and discontinued my unemployment compensation.

Weirdly, after I discontinued my unemployment, my state started sending me these open job postings They allege that they are sending me these listings based upon my skill set(s). But in most cases, it's pretty clear that the postings have nothing to do with anything I've ever done, and I find them so amusing that I haven't bothered unsubscribing. I get listings for things like "cashier at Sunglass Hut," "home health aid," "HVAC tech," etc. 

Today, I got a listing from a print shop. I saw they were hiring for an "Epic Mail Inserter," so I showed my boyfriend in case he'd like to switch careers.

He said he'd rather be a Fork.

🤣

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Yesterday, I went to a party/ceremony for the newborn son of my former coworker, Jean. I worked with Jean about 2 years ago, when I got a job surveying. What a crazy job that was. But I have such fond memories of the surveying portion, despite the terrible management from the home office, despite all of the equipment malfunctions, despite the housing problems, despite the fact that my truck was a deathtrap that broke down over and over and over....

I wondered if Simon and Kasey would be there, and if I'd have a confrontation with Simon. Sometimes I think that if I ran into Simon on the street, I'd run away screaming like my hair was on fire lol. What would I do if I was trapped in a room with him? 

I worried about it briefly, then decided I'd just say, "Hi," and smile into his face like I did when he cut my salary. He only has power when he looks like the good guy. But he wasn't there, and neither was Kasey. I sat at a table with my old work compadres and we had a really nice time 🙂

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We watched True Romance last night. Still a great movie. Arnold was reminded of it on Friday night when he heard music that was similar to the True Romance theme music (a lighthearted tropical marimba piece that belies the movie's violent plot). He played me a video with the music and I actually got the chills remembering the movie. So we watched it again yesterday. Still epic.

 

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On 3/9/2022 at 11:14 AM, Jibralta said:

What I found fascinating, besides the depth of knowledge, is the harmony between the harvesting process and the ecosystem. This desert is also a salt marsh. In April, the harvest is completed, the people pack up and leave, and the area is completely inundated by monsoons until it becomes a shallow sea.

The floodwaters link up to the sea, and I think that is where the salt comes in. Shrimp also come in, and they are harvested at the end of the monsoon season--which explains the boats that you see in the beginning and end of the film. I suppose the water is finally  absorbed into the desert, and that it is this water which gets pumped back out when the families return the next year.

It strikes me as a profound cycle that takes great wisdom and intelligence to recognize and tap into.

I'm watching a documentary about honeybees called The Pollinators. It's pretty interesting--and scary the way our food supply is controlled for us. One of the beekeepers said, "The chemical companies think we should all be eating corn, soybeans, and rice, which don't require pollination." I knew the agricultural industry liked us to eat soybeans and corn, but here is yet another reason for that. And it's unsettling but not surprising to see that our food choices are controlled by chemical companies. 

The documentary shows commercials from the 1950s, where pesticides are presented as a way for us to "fight the enemy," i.e., insects. It seems that us-against-them mentality was misguided.

About 20 years ago, the EPA forced the chemical companies to change the pesticides to address concerns about toxicity. However, it turns out the new pesticides are even more harmful than the old ones. It's so bad that even the managed bee population is in danger. Managed bees are protected by people, who transport them from crop to crop across the United States, and who make sure they remain healthy and fed. But they can't protect them from the pesticides.

The really interesting thing is that are not enough "naturally occurring" bees to support our food supply. From what I can tell so far, the agricultural industry has had this "managed" supply of bees for at least 70 years. They travel across the US on tractor trailers. If you've seen a trailer wrapped in black fabric, it's probably one of these bee trucks. 

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I am really good at going down the rabbit hole. A couple days ago, I was googling Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi. While reading an article, I clicked a link to get an example of a Longaberger basket. The link took me to a "404 not found" page on a home organization website called "Organize 365." I have been trapped in a home organization hole ever since. I find this highly ironic. All of this time I've spend listening to podcasts and watching videos could have been spent doing some actual organizing. 

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4 hours ago, Jibralta said:

I am really good at going down the rabbit hole. A couple days ago, I was googling Denise Scott Brown and Robert Venturi. While reading an article, I clicked a link to get an example of a Longaberger basket. The link took me to a "404 not found" page on a home organization website called "Organize 365." I have been trapped in a home organization hole ever since. I find this highly ironic. All of this time I've spend listening to podcasts and watching videos could have been spent doing some actual organizing. 

Jib,

 

This is very funny, and so true right?! 
 

I get the impression you are a neat and organised type of gal naturally anyway?

 

x

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On 3/20/2022 at 7:09 PM, Jibralta said:

We watched True Romance last night. Still a great movie. Arnold was reminded of it on Friday night when he heard music that was similar to the True Romance theme music (a lighthearted tropical marimba piece that belies the movie's violent plot). He played me a video with the music and I actually got the chills remembering the movie. So we watched it again yesterday. Still epic.

 

Absolutely love this film one of my favourites. I also love Vanilla Sky.

 

I still think the best kinds of people are the people who would want to go get coffee and pie at 1 in the morning to discuss the late movie you just saw.

 

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Edited by mylolita
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4 hours ago, mylolita said:

I get the impression you are a neat and organised type of gal naturally anyway?

At work.... yes, I'm pretty strict about it. But at home.... no, not really. My boyfriend's joke is that if he wasn't around, everything I own would be in piles in the middle of the room. I imagine it would be a lot like Close Encounters of the Third Kind, with me scratching my head at the piles and muttering, "I know this means something..." Mind you, my boyfriend isn't exactly neat himself. 

I think that part of the problem that we face at home is that we have many belongings in a tiny little place. So, it's difficult to keep things neat. We do keep things pretty organized. But the minute one thing moves the whole place is in disarray. But it is clean and it is homey. And I like that it is eclectic and an amalgamation of random furniture and objects. I think I'd die inside if I had a matched set of furniture. So, it's probably best that things are the way that they are right now.

Eventually, we will get a bigger place. Then the truth will come out about how neat and organized we really are. 

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26 minutes ago, Jibralta said:

At work.... yes, I'm pretty strict about it. But at home.... no, not really. My boyfriend's joke is that if he wasn't around, everything I own would be in piles in the middle of the room. I imagine it would be a lot like Close Encounters of the Third Kind, with me scratching my head at the piles and muttering, "I know this means something..." Mind you, my boyfriend isn't exactly neat himself. 

I think that part of the problem that we face at home is that we have many belongings in a tiny little place. So, it's difficult to keep things neat. We do keep things pretty organized. But the minute one thing moves the whole place is in disarray. But it is clean and it is homey. And I like that it is eclectic and an amalgamation of random furniture and objects. I think I'd die inside if I had a matched set of furniture. So, it's probably best that things are the way that they are right now.

Eventually, we will get a bigger place. Then the truth will come out about how neat and organized we really are. 

Same here, same reason and no matchy-matchy for us either!

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I am a certified neat freak and way uptight. This is part of our kitchen in our old house we just sold. Gives you an idea how I am even with three kids. LOL! 

 

We did design it from start to finish so it was my baby but still, get a life much comes to mind.

 

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Edited by mylolita
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