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Jibralta
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Well, it turns out I was totally off-base about that. Glad I didn't show up with an attitude lol! It was clear once I got there that a posture evaluation was part of the typical assessment process. Funny how mad I got. My blood was boiling!

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My coworker was out a couple of days last week with a stomach bug. It started with his 1 year old daughter, who goes to daycare. At first, they thought something it was something she ate. But a couple hours later, Oscar (my coworker) became sick. Then two hours later, his wife became sick as well.

I thought it was interesting that the onset was so sudden they could pinpoint it to the hour. Something like that happened to me about 9 years ago. I was sitting at the kitchen table talking to my roommate when I suddenly felt the illness descend on me all at once. I got the chills, and knew I had a fever. Minutes later, my stomach was cramping. I was sick with that bug for three days. 

Anyway, the daycare called Oscar and informed him that there was a stomach bug going around the school. Despite all the disinfecting and masks and distancing and whatnot, a stomach bug still tore through the place.

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Hopefully they all got tested for Covid. My nephew got Covid and his first symptoms were stomach distress (nausea, diarrhea and vomiting). He tested positive two days after he started feeling sick. Then my brother and I got it. It was no bueno.

 

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14 hours ago, boltnrun said:

My nephew got Covid and his first symptoms were stomach distress (nausea, diarrhea and vomiting).

Interesting! Those aren't the symptoms that I usually hear about.

On my first day of work at this job, within two hours of me starting, the receptionist tested positive for COVID and work sent everybody home. She had no idea that she had COVID. Her symptoms were very light--she thought it was an allergy. But she took the test as a precaution anyway.

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Yeah, temperature checks are a good idea but they don't determine who does and does not have Covid. I never had a fever and neither did my nephew. My cousin was hospitalized and put on oxygen and never, not once, spiked a fever. None of us in my household had a cough or difficulty breathing either. My nephew was sick for over a month. So were my brother and I. It's a difficult illness because the symptoms are varied plus they mimic so many other common ailments such as seasonal allergies and the common cold.

It's why I'm a big advocate for precautionary protocols and getting vaccinated!

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On 9/21/2021 at 7:47 PM, boltnrun said:

Hopefully they all got tested for Covid. My nephew got Covid and his first symptoms were stomach distress (nausea, diarrhea and vomiting). He tested positive two days after he started feeling sick. Then my brother and I got it. It was no bueno.

 

Bolt, I was going to say that. Back when I got so sick in 2020, one of the viruses was intestinal. I couldn’t eat for months! I’m sure it was a form of COVID, but I didn’t qualify for testing then.

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The Patriots played the Buccaneers yesterday at Gillette Stadium. For me, it was exciting because I love Bill Belichick and I love Tom Brady. I didn't get to see the game, but I watched the highlights this morning. It was nice and close. I like that. I also like that the crowd heartily cheered Brady before the game, and booed the sht out of him after the game started. Seemed like the right thing to do lol.

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I confirmed that my biological mother was 16 when she had me. My bio-dad was 20. She was 15 and he was 19 when I was conceived. I found photos of them from their high school year books. They were just kids.

It makes me wonder how she got into that mess. I was so careful when I was a teenager. I was just shy of 20 when I finally abandoned my virginity. Maybe I was so careful because I knew what happened to her (me!).

It's interesting looking at their ages  because it parallels my life in a way. When I was 15, my boyfriend was 19 too. We were together for almost two years. But even though our hormones were surging, I didn't have sex with him.

I feel bad for her, that she was so vulnerable. And I can see how young she was. It couldn't have been easy being pregnant in Texas in the 70s. Especially not in the tiny little towns that they both came from. 

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Posted (edited)

Genealogy is such an interesting puzzle. You find pieces here and there that don't quite fit with the picture you're focusing on, but you know they probably belong. So you put them off to one side and return to them later. 

I can't believe that, even years later, I remember that I've come across these random bits of information here and there. But I do remember, and I go back and find them and put them into place.

Brains are amazing.

Because of its puzzle-like qualities, I sometimes think my boyfriend would enjoy genealogy. He loves puzzles. He's so good at them that he does 3000-piece puzzles without ever looking at the box to see what the picture is. 

But he doesn't have much interest in the ancestry puzzle. Unlike me, he knows who his immediate family is. I tease him that it gives him a false sense of security--just because you know who your parents and grandparents (and perhaps great-grandparents)* are, doesn't mean that you know the story of your family. 

My interest in genealogy was certainly sparked by nearly 40 years of not knowing anything about my biological family (except for the name of my biological mother). But I'm not sure if that's still the driving force behind my continued curiosity. Yes, I'm still 100% curious about my immediate biological relatives. But I'm also a history buff, and tracing my ancestors illuminates the past in a way that nothing else can. 

___________________________

Speaking of great-grandparents, last night I discovered that one of my biological great-grandmothers lived until 106. She actually outlived my biological grandmother and was alive until the year after I graduated from high school. I could have known this person.... and she lived through and saw so much.... how interesting!

Edited by Jibralta
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/16/2021 at 3:59 PM, Jibralta said:

I think a lot of people struggle with balance, especially as they are first starting to take on adult responsibilities. And even through adulthood, balance can be an ongoing challenge, particularly when your circumstances are in a state of flux.

On 10/15/2021 at 3:34 AM, Nasnas said:

That is I have the tendency to want to pause on one to do the other one effectively. Does this make sense?

To me it does. Where work, school, and relationships are concerned, I think you have to make a long term plan and prioritize one at a time. But the strategy can (and should) change as the situation changes. Once you have one of them in order, it becomes easier to balance the other two.

I don't know why, but I've never been able to successfully use a day planner. I've tried multiple times, starting in grade school. I love day planners and calendars and have genuinely longed to fill a whole planner with neat, organized schedules and to-do lists--just like I've always longed to have neat handwriting. But my planners always turn into a mess, and I give up. The thing is, for me, creating a to-do list ends up feeling like a meaningless waste of time when I could actually be accomplishing tasks.

I know that lists are useful, and I do resort to them sometimes. But I inevitably abandon them. I think I just naturally operate on a very general, long term increment, and I like to leave open ends for greater flexibility. For example, my career change. I budgeted three and a half years for the new degree, and then left the career development phase open-ended. I knew it would take at least 10 years to become established, so I didn't nail anything down. I was prepared to go with the flow and resolved to roll with the punches as they came. And I'm very comfortable like that--much more comfortable than if I attempted to plan every step. 

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On 10/4/2021 at 12:32 PM, Jibralta said:

I confirmed that my biological mother was 16 when she had me. My bio-dad was 20. She was 15 and he was 19 when I was conceived. I found photos of them from their high school year books. They were just kids.

It makes me wonder how she got into that mess. I was so careful when I was a teenager. I was just shy of 20 when I finally abandoned my virginity. Maybe I was so careful because I knew what happened to her (me!).

It's interesting looking at their ages  because it parallels my life in a way. When I was 15, my boyfriend was 19 too. We were together for almost two years. But even though our hormones were surging, I didn't have sex with him.

I feel bad for her, that she was so vulnerable. And I can see how young she was. It couldn't have been easy being pregnant in Texas in the 70s. Especially not in the tiny little towns that they both came from. 

That is hard. Poor girl was still a child really. But it gives us compassion for them . 

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I'm still reading this infernal book, The Plains of Passage. I've been eking along at a snail's pace. I'm now on page 247, which is only 17 pages farther than I was a month ago. That's because most nights, I don't even open the book. I take it off the shelf and fall asleep with it on my chest. The idea of reading the book puts me to sleep.

Last night, I woke up in the middle of the night and couldn't fall back to sleep. I came out into the living room with The Plains of Passage, read a couple pages, and nodded off. Then I went back to bed and slept soundly for the rest of the night.

I've read this book before, and I'm pretty sure that I've read it more than once. I have no idea how I got through it. I'm tempted to say that my standards were lower back then (it was over 20 years ago), but I've reread a lot of my favorite books from my teens and early 20s and found that most--MOST--were good reads even for my 40 year old mind. I guess this book is just one of the few exceptions.

This morning, I looked up reviews for The Plains of Passage and found that a lot of people felt the same way that I do: this book is more of a research dump than a novel. And it has a lot of sex scenes. This book is probably why I remember the series as being a little bit on the smutty side. Clan of the Cave Bear and The Valley of Horses had sex scenes, but they served the plot. Even the sex scenes in The Mammoth Hunters served the plot (although I found that the plot of that book to be on the weak side). Some of the reviews that I read rated The Plains of Passage with high marks, but those readers were generally devoted to the series. 

I came upon an interview with Jean M. Auel, and within the first minute she said that she set out to write a story about a woman who was raised by people who were very different than she was. While researching that theme, she learned (through Encyclopedia Britannica) that there was a period of time where Neanderthals and people like us lived at the same time. I stopped the video there and will watch it later. My suspicion is that she got carried away by her research as she was writing the series. 

I know this essay has been quite critical, but I don't mean to disparage her talent at all. I still appreciate the series for many reasons. But it's quite a tough read.

 

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I really like my new job. There's a lot I can say about this, but time is short so I'll be brief. It's a lot of work. I find myself working through most weekends and that can be frustrating. However, I really like my coworkers. In many ways, we are all like-minded people. This is a tough career with many challenges, and I find that the people in this company are all thinking about the problem instead of reacting to it. What a difference that makes!!

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2 hours ago, Jibralta said:

I really like my new job. There's a lot I can say about this, but time is short so I'll be brief. It's a lot of work. I find myself working through most weekends and that can be frustrating. However, I really like my coworkers. In many ways, we are all like-minded people. This is a tough career with many challenges, and I find that the people in this company are all thinking about the problem instead of reacting to it. What a difference that makes!!

Yes I can so relate to being so grateful about liking the work and liking your colleagues and having rapport -but..... too much of a good thing!  How are you at saying no to more work/keeping boundaries? Or do you still feel new so you feel you can't say no?

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2 hours ago, Batya33 said:

Or do you still feel new so you feel you can't say no?

It's along these lines, despite the fact that I feel totally welcome and totally supported. I'm sure I have some residual self-doubt (and distrust!!) from the last few jobs. My 3 month review went really well. The owner, Nadine, rated me higher than I rated myself on some things (and never lower than I rated myself).

A couple weeks into this job, the HR lady sat me down to see how I was settling in. I can't remember exactly how the conversation went, but I was telling her how I feel like I need to relax more, and that I felt myself starting to relax. I said that my last few jobs were pretty crazy. She said, "It's called PTSD!!!" and I laughed. It was nice to finally talk to someone who didn't blow off my views as a result of me being weak or inferior in some way.

I take these good experiences to heart. They are just a few out of many. Good things happen every day, positive signs of normalcy. I know that with a little more time, I'll stop bracing for the crazy to come out. I saw the crazy at my last two jobs on day one. It was loud and proud, never hidden.* And I, with my career trajectory in mind, chose to minimize and excuse it.

There's no sign of crazy here. I haven't had to make a single excuse for someone. These are normal people. 

____________________________

* I think 'loud and proud' is a symptom of that particular type of crazy

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I think I've identified all 16 of my great-great-grandparents (a.k.a 2nd great-grandparents or 2GGs). It's interesting to look at them as a group.

They were all born between 1840 and 1893--a 50 year spread! Two of them were born in Iowa, two of them were born in Illinois, one was born in Virginia, five were born in Texas, three were born in Georgia, one was born in Pennsylvania (he is the oldest--1840), one was born in Louisiana, and one was born in Arkansas. Twelve of them died in Texas (seven migrated there during their lives), and four migrated to Kansas, where they eventually died.

My 2GGs on my bio-mother's side were all close in age with each other as couples. What I mean is, they all married people who were within a year or two of their own age.

On my bio-father's side, three out of four 2GG couples were 10 years apart. Generally, it was the man marrying a younger woman, but in one case it was a woman marrying a younger man.

All four 2GGs on my bio-mother's maternal line were born between 1840 and 1846. All four 2GGs on my bio-mother's paternal line were born between 1867 and 1872. I find it very interesting that there's a 30-year gap between these sets of 2GGs.

On my bio-father's side, the 2GGs were a mix of people born between 1872 and 1893. Three were born in the 1870s, three were born in the 1880s, and three were born in the 1890s. It's interesting that as a 'set,' these people are in the next segment 'up' generation-wise. 

Does that even make sense?

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I find this stuff so interesting - you’re inspiring me to get my butt in gear and do research on my own family. My mum already started on relatives on her side, and I think has traced it back to when great-great-somebody migrated from Ireland over to Scotland. Any further back will probably be tricky because it’s a very common surname. Want to learn more about my dad’s side, and really regret not talking more with my gran (his mother) when she was alive. He feels the same and has inherited loads of family photographs but no idea who some of the people are in them.

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I haven't even broached Europe, yet. My ancestors have been in the US long enough that there's much work to be done here before I even attempt to start the Europe segment. 

My European heritage is shown in Ancestry, but it's pretty vague--I think because centuries passed since many of my ancestors migrated here. My boyfriend's mom came here from England in the mid-60s, and you can see that his "England and Northwestern Europe" segment is much more specific than mine. In contrast, his Jewish segment is quite vague (this is more apparent in the diagram on Ancestry than it is in the breakdown below). I think the vagueness is in part because his ancestors on his dad's side (which is the Jewish side) immigrated here a couple generations ago. It also has to do with the degree of research that's been done on Jewish populations thus far.

My mom's ethnicity estimates pinpoint exactly where her family hails from in Greece. My grandmother immigrated here in 1920 and my grandfather even later than that. There were lots of records available at that time, which is probably why the estimate is so specific. 

These ethnicity values have changed a lot for us over time. Presumably it is becoming more accurate as research develops and more people participate. But who the hell knows what's really going on. Previously, I only had a small percentage of Scottish and a much larger percentage of Germanic and Northwestern Europe. My boyfriend's results literally said that he was 50% English and 50% Jewish, which struck us both as funny for some reason. My mom's ethnicity was initially "Greco-Roman" with Middle Eastern and African mixed in.  

Has your family been in Scotland long? If so, I think your result would probably be quite granular if you ended up doing Ancestry. 

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On 10/27/2021 at 11:58 AM, Jibralta said:

Has your family been in Scotland long? If so, I think your result would probably be quite granular if you ended up doing Ancestry. 

I’m not sure, I know there was a big influx of Irish in the mid 19th century but I feel that’s too recent. Will need to sit mum down and ask her properly!

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So, a little off topic but a friend has twins -boy and girl -who are in 4th or 5th grade -they are part Russian, part eastern european etc and they were supposed to dress for school as "their culture" -so they chose to go as members of the solar system.

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