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Ever thought of going to Bhutan?


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Bhutan is the happiest country in Asia and eight happiest in the world. The progress of that country is measured by gross happiness index and not gross domestic product. Recently, they had television with only a few educational and news channels broadcast. I can't imagine my life without internet, mobile and my laptop. But people there are happy. They work in the day time mostly in agriculture or horticulture. Favorite pastime is archery. But they are super content with their lives. Wonder how? What's their secret to happiness?

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If you can't make yourself happy, nothing ever will (this includes a country).

 

There is no secret other than do things you love and live at a leisure pace. And of course, less is more. More crap you have, the more headaches you end up with.....blah blah blah

 

PS. I don't believe in the whole "happiness" ratings for countries. Mostly because I come from another country and complete poverty, and even then we were just fine and very happy. Today, I live like a king by my standards (perhaps "middle class" in American standards) and my happiness levels have not changed at all. Actually I remember MORE happiness back when we didn't have much.....as it gave us more time to focus on important things.

 

Now you see why I think materialistic things are not only unhealthy but actually HARMFUL to us. We spend so much time working to obtain them...while we ignore our loved ones....and then once we get those things, we spend even MORE time using those things....while again ignoring our loved ones.

 

Just glad I learned all that fairly early in life...

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Well, happy if you aren't a particular ethnic minority

 

In the 1990s, Bhutan expelled or forced to leave most of its ethnic Lhotshampa population, one-fifth of the country's entire population, demanding conformity in religion, dress, and language.[56][57][58] The decision was motivated by the concern that the fast-growing Nepali minority were starting to revolt for a separate independent state, recalling similar events that caused the collapse of the nearby kingdom of Sikkim in 1975. Lhotshampas were arrested and expelled from the country and their property was expropriated.[59] An alleged harassment campaign escalating in the early 1990s ensued, and afterwards Bhutanese security forces began expelling people. According to the UNHCR, more than 107,000 Bhutanese refugees living in seven camps in eastern Nepal have been documented as of 2008.[58] Whether all inhabitants are in fact refugees is questionable because the UNHCR did not check the initial inhabitants of the refugee camps adequately.[60] The facilities inside the camp, which were reportedly[citation needed] better than in the surroundings, provided a strong motivation for Nepalese to seek admittance. After many years in refugee camps, many inhabitants are now moving to host nations such as Canada, Norway, the United Kingdom, Australia, and the United States as refugees. The United States has admitted 60,773 refugees from fiscal years 2008 through 2012.[61]

 

The Nepalese government does not permit citizenship for Bhutanese refugees, so most of them have become stateless.[62] Careful scrutiny has been used to prevent their relatives from getting ID cards and voting rights.[62] Bhutan considers the political parties of these refugees illegal and terrorist in nature.[62] Human rights groups initially claimed the government interfered with individual rights by requiring all citizens, including ethnic minority members, to wear the traditional dress of the ethnic majority in public places. The government strictly enforced the law in Buddhist religious buildings, government offices, schools, official functions, and public ceremonies

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Totally agree with you DoF. Its our constant race for things that make us unhappy. One after another, the wishlist never ends.

 

I try to stay away from those that chase things....or try to get rich.

 

Those people will never be happy no matter what.

 

I remember back 15 years ago when I worked at a lawfirm, one guy owned islands and had millions....one of the most miserable souls I have ever met. Most of those folks seemed quite miserable actually (Partners/attorneys)

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  • 3 years later...
Very polite people, almost non existent crime, clean air and water around. Whichever city you explore, you wouldn't regret.

So if you are a calm person and like places which are serene unlike loud party types, bhutan will not disappoint you.

 

This is a 3 year old thread. Hopefully the OP has decided by now whether or not to make the trip.

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