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Should I take a break


gary1958

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I was recently packaged off by a large insurance firm after 8 years. My severance is good until October 1 of this year. Now I have a wealth of knowledge in the marketing/print field. Although one doesn't always know ones worth in the job market until you test it. I should also say that I am in my early 50's. Not sure age is a factor too much anymore. Here is my quandry. 2 1/2 years ago both my mother and father got sick. My sister and myself took care of them both as they worsened with my father passing away almost 2 years ago and my mother following 6 months later. I watched them both die. My father within 6 months from a brain tumor and my mother withering away from Parkinsons and Leukemia. One week after my mother passed my sisters boyfriend committed suicide leaving 3 small kids without a father.

 

Through all of this I stood strong and being the oldest took on most of the responsibility. I never really took anytime for me. Typically I am the type of guy that when a job ends I go into overdrive never trying to miss a beat and getting back out in the work force. This time though, I am financially in quite a good place with no debt other and than typical house bills ( heat, hydro, groceries). Am having my salary paid up until October. Although it is hard for me to not want to race out and find employment. I really feel like this might be a good time to take a break and breath.

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Any large gaps in this economic environment in employment suicide! Go with the gusto. If you want some R & R, take a vacation to decompress for two or three weeks. Don't just roll-over, and think work will fall out of the sky, and in place when you want it. I'd put your resumes out there, and request a specific start-date. Unless you are higher-level, or upper management, there's plenty of competition out there.

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Any large gaps in this economic environment in employment suicide! Go with the gusto. If you want some R & R, take a vacation to decompress for two or three weeks. Don't just roll-over, and think work will fall out of the sky, and in place when you want it. I'd put your resumes out there, and request a specific start-date. Unless you are higher-level, or upper management, there's plenty of competition out there.

 

I agree with this! Get your resume out there. Large gaps will look bad and you don't want to put yourself in a bad position by giving yourself a few months to look for a job hoping you'll get one. However, I feel there's nothing wrong with taking several weeks to relax and take a breather. But don't put off applying for jobs. Worse case you can always ask to start later if you get a job right away, allowing yourself a month or however much time you need to just relax. That's completely normal.

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Ok, when you are middle-aged, it is harder to get a job because you are competing with younger people who may be willing to take a lower salary than you. So it takes longer to find a job, and you may not be making the same salary so you need to save your money and not count on getting the same amount as before.

 

I think you would be OK to take a short break (a month), but nothing longer than that, because you might have a 'built in' break of 9 months to two years before you find another job at your age. It could be shorter that than if you are in a really in demand field, but count on at least 6 months minimum if you started looking tomorrow. Sometimes people get lucky, but in today's market, the can take a long time to find a job, especially when you are either really young and inexperienced, or over the age of 45.

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I say, take a sabbatical. Something you can report on. Go volunteer and write about it, publish it freelance. Pain, I know, but my point is this: your post reads as if you feel you are on a treadmill. You need to get off the treadmill. Your job hunt, networking, and interviews will convey a commanding energy once you get more clarity about you. Until then, the pain can be a fuzzy layer in your brain, diminishing your natural personality and judgment.

 

Do not do what my friend did, unless you have to. He was a banker on 9 11 11, and he quit to work at Starbucks. He recovered his career, but it conveyed then like instability. Make a more congruent choice in how you use your time out of the office.

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