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Quitting my job - am I making a mistake?


Neil123

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Hi,

 

I'm about to make a big decision and I could really do with some objective advice. I frequent a lot of forums but I really believed this was the best place especially as it's generally about happiness and not specifically career, travel etc.

 

Anyways, I'm a 23 yo male. I graduated with a physics degree and I now find myself in my second year of an accountancy training contract, which I'm really not enjoying.

 

18 months ago I broke up with my first girlfriend and had a bit of a break down. I took the advice from this forum and have stayed single and focused on myself. I've taken up new hobbies (gym, reading and guitar) and I've really come a long way. At the same time, I've made plans to have a career change towards International politics whilst also maximizing my personal development opportunities. In 2 weeks I plan to hand in my notice and backpack solo around Asia for 6 months. Then in September, I've been accepted onto a Masters Degree (International Relations) at an English speaking university in China for a year where I can hopefully start learning Mandarin as well. Although I have a great family and great friends, I do feel like it'd be good for me mentally to get away from all the expectations on me. I'm also quite low on confidence with women after being out the game for so long and I think it'd be a great refresher.

 

As expected, as it all nears, I'm starting to have fears which I'm sure is perfectly natural, especially as not many people approve. Am I making a mistake? Is quitting a training contract suicide for my career? Would it be best to finish my training contract and go in 18 months?

 

I just don't think I can handle another 18 more months of stagnation in life. It's too much, especially when I'm 23 and should be trying to figure it all out. There's no time like the present surely!

 

Thanks

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You are young and you have no children or mortgages at your neck.

 

Do whatever makes you happy.

 

I worked 2 yrs something I don't like with my father, I'm a bit older though and much of his responsibilities unfortunately fell on me.

 

Result? Heavy depression and severely damaged intra family relations.

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Well, if you are discovering you are hating being an accountant and don't want to do that, then it is time to make a change while you are young. But you do have to think practically as to what you are going to do for a living, and whether what you choose means you are employable or not.

 

So your next step is deciding what you do want to do if you don't want to do accounting. And doing the financial planning you need to do to be able to quit your job and not impoverish yourself. And to find a way to pay for an education or whatever it takes to change careers to something you think you'll find more suited.

 

So don't just think 'I hate my life and want to quit my job,' think 'what do I need to do to find something else to do and to have enough money to get the education I need to do that?' Then work towards that goal. If the career path you are choosing is a good one, and you have the financial means to be able to not work for 6 months and then pay for your school, then good for you!

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Neil, one thing that jumped off the page to me was that you are planning to go to China. I am wondering...do you have any idea how bad the pollution is in China?? My friend's daughter is in China teaching English to children and it is necessary for her to wear a mask ALWAYS as the pollution affected her so severely that it contributed to her coming down with pneumonia and required hospitilzation. There is a poster on here who mentioned the same problem with polution in China and it was so severe that he could not go outside. The lack of exercise was contribituing to his state of depression. I think that you should really look into this pollution problem in China and do the research about it and everything else before you jump into a plan without prior knowledge about it. chi

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If you have a degree in physics... why are you working in accountancy?

If you have work in accountancy... why are youlooking to go to China for another degree?

It sounds like you don't know what you want.

Until you figure that out...keep working and save $$.

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If you have the cash to pay for it or have done enough job/career research that you're confident you can get a job to finance the education go for it. Don't go into a bunch of debt getting a degree in something you enjoy without maki sure there are viable job prospects first.

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A collective thank you to everybody for the responses so far!

 

@erklat Sorry to hear about your situation. I completely agree about the being young part. Although a mortgage is doubtful atm, I could be in a serious relationship in 18 months so I should go while I have no commitments!

 

@lavenderdove Fortunately expenses won't be an issue as I've saved enough to follow up on my plans. I've developed a passion for travel (who hasn't? and international affairs in the past two years so an MA in international relations and language learning seems like a logical step to move towards a career based on that. Options for a career are the Foreign Office, political risk analyst, NGO work. The common denominator is the international scope really!

 

@chitown9 Thanks for the heads up. Fortunately I've researched it quite a bit and it shouldn't be an issue. I do love exercise but there are indoor gyms where the air should be breathable so hopefully I can keep healthy.

 

@mhowe I never really had any direction until now. I took physics because I enjoyed it at the time and managed to get a first. I then left university very confused and fell into accountancy which was a great way to bide my time and after the qualification "the world is my oyster" as I've heard so often (not strictly true in my opinion). As above, the common denominator that I want in a career is international travel and focus, regardless if it's in the public or private sector, and I think my 20's is the time to really pursue that. My plans should hopefully put me on the map as well as help me develop personally as well as work through some issues I'm facing at the moment.

 

After all, how am I going to figure out what I want to do if I just stick in a job I hate which isn't stimulating me or giving me new experiences?

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@pl3easehelp I'm not 100% sure where the MA will take me but it will certainly be useful in the future due to my interests. I've saved most of the money already but I'm lucky enough to have supportive parents so that debt will not be an issue.

 

On that note, good night everybody. Thank you all again and I'll check this in the morning

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ABSOLUTELY GO!!!! You have youth and money on your side.

 

If anything, you can go and realize it ISN"T what you want to do and then something else will come along. Don't chain yourself to some ghastly existence just because you think you should.

 

Yep, it's not very practical advice, I know, but Life is Too Short. I'm making a career change and am over twice your age. I'm currently just burned out, phoning my job in and not giving my best to the job because I want to be ANYWHERE else but there...

 

DO IT! And I wish you the best of luck in your life's adventure!

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I would honestly save up a little more money for the unexpected. You might have enough for the program, but what happens if you have to fly home if a parent is ill or a relative passes away? Or what if you get sick? Do you have the money for treatment or to fly home or to a European country or Japan that would treat you if its something major?

 

I would also learn Mandarin NOW - not "hopefully" when you go to the school but start taking courses whether its at the university or if there is a chinese speaker conversation group to start with.

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Just wanted to throw in my 2 cents. I agree if you don't like what you are doing and you are young and have funds...do something...find opportunities that allow you to find yourself....but a word of caution...

 

international relations...politics...these are degrees that generally don't result in jobs. be prepared for a lot of networking and sucking up to people for work. my fiancee has a masters in public admin and a masters in poli sci. he might as well have done it for interest...like i am just saying if u want to do a degree with the intention of hoping that degree will prepare you for a job, find that employer first and ask them what they would need....perhaps u r wanting to do this program because u r wanting to find yourself though and u r interested in the topic...and don't necessarily have high expectations of good job opportunity afterwards...in which case go for it..have fun

 

my fiancee also has a subscription to the economist and i always see these international relations "executive" degree programs. i feel like it is such bologna. now a days people are wanting to get so educated...and for what? i have a friend who has a masters in law/human rights. luckily she has funds and enjoyed the program, but its like.. thats like getting a degree in working for free.

 

just my 2 cents.

 

/end rant

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my fiancee also has a subscription to the economist and i always see these international relations "executive" degree programs. i feel like it is such bologna. now a days people are wanting to get so educated...and for what? i have a friend who has a masters in law/human rights. luckily she has funds and enjoyed the program, but its like.. thats like getting a degree in working for free.

 

just my 2 cents.

 

/end rant

 

If you can get scholarships or grants or a teaching assistant job to fund a graduate program, it's a lot more enjoyable and interesting than working in some of the crummy jobs available out there. Well, I would think, anyway. I haven't gone to grad school since I scored a bit too low in my undergrad to get a free ride, although high enough to be admitted to almost any program within my major.

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Thanks for your 2 cents!

 

Yeah you were spot on when you said it's more about personal development as well as personal interest in the degree subject. It's really just an extension of my travelling experience, but with an opportunity to stick in one place and get involved on campus as well.

 

I've heard the critiques before for politics subjects but in my case, I'm hoping it will add to my physics degree (mathematical!) and accountancy experience to show I'm an all rounder. Anyways, i hope your fiancé has better luck, he sounds very clever so I'm sure it'll reap benefits in the end!

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  • 2 weeks later...

follow your heart... life is an experience... what do you want to experience.... decide what you truly want and go with it and put confidence into that decision, who knows the outcome may not even be what you thought maybe better i quit my job and oh gooooooooood did the stress and bad energy just fade away

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