Jump to content

Thank you email after phone screen interview?


Recommended Posts

What is everyone's thoughts on sending a follow up email after having a 10-15 minute phone screen interview with the HR/Recruiter about a job I am really interested in?

 

The email she sent me about picking a time to call seems automated, so I'm not sure if she would get it if I used that email.

 

I am connected with her on LinkedIn. My friend suggested sending her a quick note there. Should I? If so, what should I say?

 

What about a hand written note through the mail? My only problem with that is I know they were wanting to move quickly so it may not get to her before she gets back to me.

 

I'm SO paranoid and nervous about this. I want this job SO bad and feel that I'm qualified and want to do all I can to put myself at the top of the list, but don't want to over step any boundaries.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They want what they want. If they really want you, they will be contacting you, period. I never suck up or send any kind of communication after an interview, and I get an offer from just about everywhere I interview at. The ones I don't get an offer from, usually just can't pay what I want.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its always good to build a report with anyone that has a place in the hiring process.

 

This is definitely true, although I'm not a fan of the follow up note. But when you do have interactions with HR to set up the interviews, provide references, etc. always be really professional and friendly. I've had HR tell me "don't hire that guy, he's always a jerk to HR" or "I really like that guy, he's always so nice to HR".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure exactly what you should say, but I'd do it via linkedin instead of email since HR people get so many emails. I know the linkedin notifications probably go to email too, but if she happens to sign in to her linkedin without checking email first, your message is probably the first or even the only one she'll see on there (since it seems people haven't started using linked in that much for messaging yet).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is a bit crazy how silly I get when it comes to a job I really want. I start questioning EVERY move I make.

 

In the position I am in now, I sometimes interview people who have made it past the initial phone screening process. After the interview, the candidate sends me a follow up email saying "thank you" for meeting with them, etc. I think it is nice, but it doesn't sway my vote one way or another. If I like them, I like them. If I don't, I don't. And I never respond to the email.

 

That is my experience, but I'm not in HR, so I am not constantly interviewing candidates and potentially receiving floods of follow up emails.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the position I am in now, I sometimes interview people who have made it past the initial phone screening process. After the interview, the candidate sends me a follow up email saying "thank you" for meeting with them, etc. I think it is nice, but it doesn't sway my vote one way or another. If I like them, I like them. If I don't, I don't. And I never respond to the email.

 

I'm interested in your statement there

(and I'm playing devil's advocate a bit....)

 

- if you had a candidate who was a borderline yes/no, perhaps based on just one or two items of their communications in the phone screen, but they sent you a "thank you email", saying something about how they were particularly interested in of the role from your conversation, or some different type of considered response. Could you, hand-on-heart, say that this might not give them some extra credit in a final decision?

- if someone was a "complete no" after your phone screen - would a thank you email improve their chances at all? (I guess "no")

- if someone was a "complete yes" after the phone screen - would a thank you email change their chances at all? (I guess "no", but I wonder)

 

I think borderline cases are interesting, hence the question.

 

Sometimes really good people get a bit of their communications less-than-perfect from time to time. If I thought I had one of those... and someone who then expressed a desire for feedback, or to fine tune a piece of communication sometimes... personally I'd view that as a valuable attribute.

 

(some of this does come from "my stuff"... how I deal with people and how I sometimes ask for feedback from some of my own management colleagues... despite me being a relative veteran in a reasonably senior technology management position)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes send a small thank you email after the phone screening. It won't be as long as the typical thank you email but it's nothing wrong with it. I just sent a similar thank you email after a phone screening back and November and was invited to a face to face interview.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure exactly what you should say, but I'd do it via linkedin instead of email since HR people get so many emails. I know the linkedin notifications probably go to email too, but if she happens to sign in to her linkedin without checking email first, your message is probably the first or even the only one she'll see on there (since it seems people haven't started using linked in that much for messaging yet).

 

 

A brief email thanking them for providing some important details and how his background seems to fit well and would welcome the opportunity for a face to face interview to find out more about about the organization.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the feedback!

 

I did want to give an update and ask another question.

 

I ended up not sending the follow-up "thank you" email. I got a call back yesterday about coming in for an interview. I was a bit surprised because during our initial phone call, she said the next step would be another phone interview AND THEN an office visit. Hopefully that is a good sign!

 

I touched base with my friend who works there to get some insight on what to expect from the in-person interview. She mentioned bringing a portfolio. I've never provided a portfolio for a client. Can anyone give any tips on what I should bring? How should I bring it? In a folder? Should I bind it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...