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Typo in sent cover letter


Guitarist

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I am a recent college graduate. I have applied to a music publisher in my area that has recently posted a job opening. I think my cover letter is pretty good, especially given the fact I had interned for this same company earlier this year. However, one of my sentences reads:

 

"I have focused a great deal of my time and energy into performing, perfecting, and listening to to music."

 

I saw the typo in my cover letter and started to get very nervous. I quickly replied to the e-mail with this:

 

Hello again,

 

The statement "I have focused a great deal of my time and energy into performing, perfecting, and listening to to music" contains a typo. It should read as "I have focused a great deal of my time and energy into performing, perfecting, and listening to music." I feel rather embarrassed and rushed to correct this gaffe as soon as I saw it.

 

Thanks again,

 

[My name]

 

My actual resume is perfectly formatted and worded, for what it's worth. Was sending a second message wise for me to do? The position requires a lot of proofreading and attention to detail, as the hired candidate will be assembling publications using computer software.

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If the job requires proofreading you can bet they will notice the type weather you apologize for it or not. My guess is they won't consider you for this particular position with a typo in your cover letter. You can't write an apology after a publication has be printed and distributed. That doesn't mean they won't consider you for something else though.

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Next time I would read the cover letter backwards, last word first -that way you're not looking at the words in context and it's easier to catch typos. I think the apology actually does go a long way because it shows how aware you are. Obviously it would have been better if you didn't make the typo in the first place.

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Thanks for the replies and advice.

 

The time in-between my cover letter and my message of correction is 18 minutes. I really hope that's taken into account. My actual resume is also neat and error-free. Not to mention I was an intern less than a year ago.

 

Is this typo still considered a huge blight on my application in spite of everything else? The typo occurs approximately half-way into the cover letter, following a paragraph which illustrates my time spent as an intern for the company. Would a hiring manager just delete the entire e-mail without even opening the resume?

 

I asked my older sister to read my cover letter and let me know if she could find the typo...she couldn't, and this was after I had already told her a typo was in the letter. I could have theoretically left the cover letter as is and hoped the typo would not be seen, but I wanted to come clean with my mistake and express my embarrassment over the typo.

 

I'm very nervous over this.

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Nothing you can do about it now. Try to stop OCD thinking on it and put it out to the Universe by visualizing that you've already secured the position. You can't put the toothpaste back into the tube so start putting out positive vibes instead of focusing on the mistake and hopefully they won't either.

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Believe it or not, after going through it countless times the past couple of months, it turns out my resume isn't uniform either.

 

I have four jobs listed under my Experience section. Two of the jobs contain hyphens in-between the start and end dates. The other two are using en lines. I suppose it was an issue with Microsoft Word's formatting. I have scoured my resume time and time again for weeks on end, and I'm only JUST NOW seeing this. Even if I did intern for these people recently, I think I've given myself the kiss of death given the fact this is for a production assistant job.

 

Guess I'll be working in hospitality for the rest of my life.

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Believe it or not, after going through it countless times the past couple of months, it turns out my resume isn't uniform either.

 

I have four jobs listed under my Experience section. Two of the jobs contain hyphens in-between the start and end dates. The other two are using en lines. I suppose it was an issue with Microsoft Word's formatting. I have scoured my resume time and time again for weeks on end, and I'm only JUST NOW seeing this. Even if I did intern for these people recently, I think I've given myself the kiss of death given the fact this is for a production assistant job.

 

Guess I'll be working in hospitality for the rest of my life.

 

Don't count yourself out yet. What if all the resumes they receive have typos? When I used to work in fast food, I used to see the resumes that came in when people handed them to us at the cash, and some were horrible, with really unprofessional email addresses and spelling mistakes. I know it was only fast food but I bet that happens in other fields too, especially for entry-level jobs.

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The company actually has another opening I'm interested in. I have sent another application with revisions to my cover letter and resume to reflect my interest and relevant skills for both positions. I added a note in the beginning telling them that I had originally come accross their first opening earlier this month, and that I would be sending a revised resume and cover letter for both positions. I of course also made all of my dots and lines uniform!

 

So there's that. Maybe this is all moot.

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Certainly having a typo is bad, especially when the position is for proof-reading.

 

However, don't get to down on yourself.

If the typo cost you the shot at this job, let that be the lesson and move on. It's way more important that you learn from your mistakes, than never making them in the first place.

 

There are plenty of jobs out there.

 

Also, if you previously interned at the company, why aren't you going through your former boss, or any former people you worked with/for? That is *WAY* more effective than an inbound email.

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...if you previously interned at the company, why aren't you going through your former boss, or any former people you worked with/for? That is *WAY* more effective than an inbound email.

 

I am actually attempting to do this. Unfortunately, I believe the majority of the company has been on holiday all this week until the New Year. I have sent e-mails to a fellow alumni who handles incoming interns, my former boss (since retired), and a former co-worker.

 

I also contacted another former co-worker on Facebook who I actually connected with pretty well on the job. He is unfortunately ignoring my message. I believe he actually holds one of the positions being advertised, so maybe he doesn't feel comfortable discussing it.

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When reading this I thought Wow! How cool is it that a "to to" in a cover letter as now made your resume picture perfect! Hope you have been able to accept there is nothing more to be done regarding the inital application you were referring to in the 1st post.

 

Do you have the retired boss as a reference contact? If he was respected in the company, that may work in your favor for all applications.

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