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Can you get an internship even thoe you finished school earlier?


Pall Wall

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Absolutely not! Internships are, for most employers, free labor, and it's the rare employer who'll look a gift horse...er, ready and willing employee...in the mouth.

 

A friend of mine graduated from college 18 months ago, and got an internship almost a year after graduation--and that internship has now turned into a (potential) full-time job for her. Ironically, she's now in a management, corner-office position and just interviewed a new intern (her own replacement) who is in her mid-fifties and has two masters degrees.

 

So, really, internships aren't just for current students. Yes, some employers only take on students who are eligible to receive college credit AND the majority of internships are unpaid, but you should definitely apply for any and ALL internships that you're eligible for. Or, if money isn't an issue, go ahead and contact employers you're interested in and offer to intern there for a few months. You'd be surprised how amiable people are when it comes to free labor.

 

In this current economy, interning is probably one of the smartest things you can do to gain marketable experience, without having to fight your way through the brutal job market.

 

Good luck!

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I'm aware it's something you would NOT get paid for. But truthfully from my heart for me it's more about getting the experience, the thrill of being a part of something, and wanting to see what talent I can bring, and NOT being someone who is just there for a paycheck. Is that a quality employers would find admirable something to attract them?

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I'm aware it's something you would NOT get paid for. But truthfully from my heart for me it's more about getting the experience, the thrill of being a part of something, and wanting to see what talent I can bring, and NOT being someone who is just there for a paycheck. Is that a quality employers would find admirable something to attract them?

 

i would sure think so.

 

it probably varies from place to place what kind of interns they accept but never hurts to ask around.

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  • 2 months later...

If I wanted an internship job, here is a personal truth of me, "I really don't care about a paycheck, I care about the thrill of being a part of something great, the experience." Is that something I should or should NOT mention on a cover letter or interview? Will I come off as "desperate" for saying such?

 

And is it me or are internships much harder to find and to get than regular paying jobs?

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If I wanted an internship job, here is a personal truth of me, "I really don't care about a paycheck, I care about the thrill of being a part of something great, the experience." Is that something I should or should NOT mention on a cover letter or interview? Will I come off as "desperate" for saying such?

 

And is it me or are internships much harder to find and to get than regular paying jobs?

 

I think that depends on the industry. I work in nonprofits (specifically arts and cultural nonprofits) and I never had a hard time finding an internship. Arts and cultural organizations can always use the free labor.

 

I really don't think it's necessary or useful to use the line above. Most internships these days are unpaid, so I think it's kind of assumed just by applying that you don't care about a paycheck. But I would say that you want to be part of something great and you want the experience.

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I definitely wouldn't mention the thing about not caring about a paycheck. Some internships are paid, you just get paid a lot less than what a full time person would get.

 

After I graduated, I wanted a job somewhat unrelated to my major. After about 6 months with only a few responses back, I applied for a few internships.

 

I ended up being offered a paid internship at a great company, and about 2 months after I started they offered me a full time role. I personally feel that internships are an amazing way to get your foot in the door.

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It really really depends. Geographically, economically, and even politically. In my region, unless you plan to become a nurse or a doctor, internships are dried up. I've even gone so far as to offer volunteer work for potential employers to showcase my skills; no dice.

 

Contrary to what a lot of people may say, not all employers are excited about interns. Sure they're free, but that's also their downside. They have no contractural obligation to work, so handing them important reponsibilities is a typically a non-option. And the quality can tend to be subpar. And to make matters worse, if you happen to live in a region where people are pushing for limits on this "slave labor" (which it isn't), then internships will be all the harder to find in that area.

 

And not all internships are equal either. I've once worked as an intern for the government; a whole lot of good that got me. My job pretty much consisted of pushing papers around for $10.00 an hour. That doesn't excactly scream "skilled employee" no matter how many times I rewrite my resume to include that experience. So if the OP ever does get an internship, he ought to make sure it really is the proverbial "foot in the door".

 

Good luck.

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That's good to hear that you don't have to be a current student. I graduated in December, and wanted to get into some places as internships, but didn't because I thought I would have to be a student still.

 

I also wondered, being an intern, can you consider that "experience" or do you have to have a paying job to say that you have had so much experience? I had an internship last spring/summer - I built a website for a school, met with them weekly/monthly, etc. Also I have been hired by a company that chose my design when I took a senior level web design class in the fall - we had a couple clients come in, we built a site, and at the end they chose which one they liked. Since then they have contacted me for help on updating it and putting it on the server, etc, it turned into a job. I won't say a full time job, more like a once a month if that, but it is a good start. So considering that I can say I've had a year experience in my field, but if not, then I guess I can say I have no experience in my field...

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