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getting your foot in the door with no experience?


bluelava1

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the all too common catch-22 of today's work world, especially with the economy the way it is. when every job you come accross asks for x years experience, what are ways to get your foot in the door? i don't have the money to spend on any more schooling to learn any more marketable skills (say office/computer skills for instance) but am willing and able to work a volunteer position for a time in order to better myself in such things, but even volunteer work in my area is hard to find. guess so many people in the same boat, they're overflowing with people willing to do anything. anyone else in this boat and any suggestions?

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Little bit of luck plus self belief. You'd be surprised at how far self belief goes. It's all about knowing how to talk the talk. It's a tough time for all. I am there too. I have recruitment friends (doesn't make it easier for me to get a job as field are different) but they always tell me those that know how to talk it will get it. Confidence is key. Often when they ask for x experience they mean it but it's not a deal breaker. The list of requirements these days are way OTT and very few people can fill all requirements. On the other hand I have been told a job I have applied for (I am freelance) was met with 600 applications and some applicants will stipulate that they will take 50% pay cut compared to their typical earning a year ago - it's scary. I don't see it getting much better to be honest, not in next few years, if ever(!) at least compared to before.

 

What I am doing right now is researching tech and such and considering what is going to be needed in a few years time (tech = sap/oracle/sun/dot net etc) - not much fun Those roles will be filled By Indians and soon the Chinese (= much cheaper). For me, I guess I will give up freelance for a while, take up employee job where training will be offered over several years and see where it goes.

 

Remember a lot of people are in a bad situation - those that can read the future will have the advantage (especially those that are willing to take pay cut to invest in their future - I was on major money this time last year but it's drying up, freelancers are on the bench so to speak and employees are being laid off). Key is.. don't get lazy on skills, invest your time in YOU. If not.. just enjoy life and get simple job, money isn't everything. If you have a great idea.. look into it. Don't just think 'nah.. someone else will do it.. it's not that good' - a good idea can take you far.

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At the end of the day its a game of numbers. Think of it this way with the desired experience you may get 50% call backs for interviews if your lucky, without it you may get 10% but that still 10%. Just apply to 5 times as many jobs.

 

At the end of the day you don't have a job so what else do you have to do with the 10 hours a day you would be at work!

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yep i'm looking into the temp agency thing

 

I made it a routine to set appointments and physically apply to a different agency on any given day. Give yourself plenty of time to be there. The paper work is hell, but once you put on your costume, make nice with the people and get your test scores on file, you become part of the 'active' pool that's ready for placement.

 

They don't place people who haven't made the effort to go there and interview, so don't believe that you're covered by just having a resume on file.

 

Fingers crossed for you!

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Some places hire people with no experience. But these kinds of places tend to fire a lot of people too. Like I hired at my first accounting job at a place and I had no experience. I quickly found they go through a lot of people - In fact, less than 40% of people had been there a year. THey fired me - and didn't give any explanation. Such places are like a revolving door.

 

It's a good way to start though.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Do some unpaid or low-paid internships. That looks very good on a resume and counts as experience.

 

This, though it depends on the field you're interested in. I work at a nonprofit and did 4 internships in college. All of the organizations I interned with, as well as the company that eventually hired me, said they did so because of my extensive interning experience.

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