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Nepotism


metrogirl

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Would you be comfortable working in an environment where this is allowed to occur?

 

I was made to believe that this type of thing is frowned upon in my company yet I see it happening everywhere.

 

Example...There is a maintence guy that just transferred to this location. His father is now his immediate supervisor. I needed him to retrieve some equipment that broke down on the road, he said he couldn't go because it was almost time to go home. I guess daddy told him he didn't have to go.

 

I can't say the above example really affects me, as I am part of the department but in a different classification but I know that it does affect the guys I work with as they are all on the same team.

 

How is this even allowed to happen?

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Where I work is all family. I'm not part of the family though. There's the owner, his two sons, and the wives of the two sons that run the company. It has it's advantages. It's not some corperate environment where the people in charge are invisable to us. But the downside is if you aren't part of the family there is really no hope for advancement. I've had one small promotion in my time there. I don't want too much responsibility. I like what I do. But if I was one of them I know i would make a lot more money. That's where it get's frusterating. They take home these fat paychecks while us little guys barely even get raises.

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The last long term job I had, was a family owned corporation. Nepotism was very present there and it galled a lot of people to see how much the relatives of the owner could get away with, and also friends of the owner. Interesting place. The chances for rising up the corporate ladder was very slim, but the perks there were pretty good (good benefits and vacation time and such), so it was a lucrative place to work at.

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Where I work is all family. I'm not part of the family though. There's the owner, his two sons, and the wives of the two sons that run the company. It has it's advantages. It's not some corperate environment where the people in charge are invisable to us. But the downside is if you aren't part of the family there is really no hope for advancement. I've had one small promotion in my time there. I don't want too much responsibility. I like what I do. But if I was one of them I know i would make a lot more money. That's where it get's frusterating. They take home these fat paychecks while us little guys barely even get raises.

 

I guess I would expect that in a family owned business, but I work for a large company, thousands of employess through out the district.

 

Another example...The department that oversees my department had a job opening, a little different from my position but it was what they call a padded position meaning that no one could displace you from that position. Well the department's lead person somehow got her brother in that position even though he didn't have the senority for it. A few people fought the issue but in the end they made up some BS excuse that he was the only one qualified for the position and thereforee it was awarded to him. Each and everyone in this department would have been qualified since we all do pretty much the same thing.

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Would you be comfortable working in an environment where this is allowed to occur?

 

I was made to believe that this type of thing is frowned upon in my company yet I see it happening everywhere.

 

Example...There is a maintence guy that just transferred to this location. His father is now his immediate supervisor. I needed him to retrieve some equipment that broke down on the road, he said he couldn't go because it was almost time to go home. I guess daddy told him he didn't have to go.

 

I can't say the above example really affects me, as I am part of the department but in a different classification but I know that it does affect the guys I work with as they are all on the same team.

 

How is this even allowed to happen?

 

I wouldn't like it, but I'd probably continue working there until a better opportunity arises. I don't know if there are laws against it. Even if there are I think it would be difficult to prove. And even if you could.. most people probably wouldn't want to feel like they are raising trouble. I know I would probably not take any legal action.

 

I think in smaller businesses it would be more prevalent because the sole owner/family looks out for their own. In a larger business, it would probably be more discouraged because it wouldn't be beneficial to the company.. it would only be a few people "in the chain" wrongly exerting their power and exposing the company to more trouble than anything.

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I worked for a small company, say, 200-300 employees (never was quite sure how many people worked outside the main building), where EVERYBODY was related.

Let's see, my birth father recc'd me, I was hired the same day as my ex and his sister in law, who was recc'd by his brother, who's friend from the firefighting unit got him hired, who had his brother in law working there, who's girlfriend got him the job, who's ex girlfriend got him the job...yada, yada, yad and 'round in circles we go.

See?

It was very interesting, as there were a lot of exes and spouses working together, and it was near impossible to get fired.

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yeah a family owned business is different.. I'm not 100% sure, but i think a business has to have at least 50 employees on the payroll to have to adhere to federal laws.

 

but i agree... any other company should adopt that policy. My previous job, our hospital employed well over 1000 people, but yet when our lab started up, they allowed and husband and wife to be supervisors of two different areas... equal positions. Well the husband had an affair with one of the young ones on nights - he got fired, she quit due to humiliation. The wife portion couldn't come to work for well over a week, because she was under such stress..I'm sure she was, but that now two of the three supervisors were now not available. A few weeks later she took him back and they moved to North Carolina to save their marriage (like his roving eye knows state boundaries?) AND our hospital had a nepotism policy!

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I LOATHE nepotism. It is the single largest barrier to people getting hired/promoted based on actual merit. That being said, from my own experience, you're going to run into it to some degree at any company you might work for. You can't avoid it completely no matter how large the company, and it is only going to get worse as jobs get more scarce. People like to refer to it as "networking" these days, but that's just to keep things PC.

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My supervisor started as my co-worker. She even trained me for my position. When she was promoted from teacher to director, she brought in two of her daughters and her son to work there. Good decision! They are some of the best employees we have. The daughters are awesome teachers! One of them has become a very good friend of mine, she's a chem and math teacher who has off-the-chart intelligence and personality! Her son works in document production and does a very good job, at least he does now. He started off thinking he could get a free ride because he was her son, but she soon set him straight on that! I am very lucky I work in a place where there is nepotism, it works very well here.

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IF it is a large company, it may be that HR or upper management does not know it is going on, so while they DON'T approve of it, they may not even be aware of it.

 

When good relatives/employees are brought on board, there is nothing wrong with nepotism. When a son or brother in law or whoever is brought on board where there is someone more qualified/experienced, that is where I have an issue.

 

Relatives should not be in a direct chain of command (the example of son reporting to the father) regardless of company size (unless it is a small family owned/run business.)

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I worked at a family-owned greenhouse and it was, by far, the BEST job I've ever worked at!!! They were so fair, treated their employees amazingly well, gave us random bonuses... It was an awesome job.

 

Thank you... This is how it is at our family owned business.

 

My blood pressure was starting to go up.....

 

I work for my father. I am NOT a nepotite. And I resent the insinuation that if you are related to the owners that you do nothing, are overpaid, and get away with everything...

 

Also- he treats his employees exceedingly well. Yet most are chronically unable to appreciate it until they leave. Easily 50% of people who leave here are back within 18 months looking for their job back.

 

I am actually paid the lower end of the scale for my profession/experience/education. Even though I have been here as long as the other members of the management team, I at about the median income for the whole organization. Because after all- we wouldn't want it to look like I was overpaid.

 

For YEARS every family holiday- Christmas/Easter/Birthdays/Summer Vacations were dotted with business meetings and issues. We constantly straddle that line between father/daughter and Owner/manager- it is NOT easy. No we have a laptop at the cottage so I can work while I am away if something comes up. Yippee!

 

No one else in the company gets 10:30 pm calls of "Hey- I want to run something by you", or" What was the GM on X product" last month.

 

It seems EVERY employee prefers to lodge their complaints by way of informal conversation with ME, expecting me to take it up with him -BUT- I am excluded from a lot of things b/c I am simultaneously perceived as the "rat"

 

Some try to sidestep the system by waiting until my dad is not available and then coming to me trying to blind me with BS to get me to authorize something that is under his purview, when they know he won't allow it.

 

I am constantly being told by my dad "If anything happens to me, this is what I want you to do about x" so I have to remember all that crap while wondering why my dad is so preoccupied with what happens when he's "not here"

 

And that's the short list of things that no other employee has to deal with.

 

But people think I'm a nepotite. I have always worked hard and yet for YEARS I constantly felt like I have to "prove" my value to everyone. My own FIL couldn't deal with the fact that I made more money than he, so he suggested that it was because I was the bosses daughter- not that I was qualified, experienced and educated for my position, and put in the years for it.

 

Is it worth it? In a lot of ways. When my child is sick and I have to work from home, my bosses first concern is for my son (his grandchild). I appreciate that. I have benefitted through his mentoring and learned a lot. I understand what it means to work for the best interests of the company- even to my own detriment sometimes. I don't just show up, get my paycheck and go home. And when I decide to move on, I will be a valuable employee to someone else.

 

Sorry- but some of us actually EARN what we make and the few priveleges we enjoy when related to a business owner.

 

Now I have to get back to work.....

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It's alive and well. Always has been and always will be.

 

You can work very hard, distinguish yourself, etc., but in the end, it all falls back on the relationships that you have in place with people, which can be a more subtle form of nepotism. The difference is in how it's spun; it's made to seem legitimate. You may have the skills in this case, but you're also hoisted up by the relationships that you have with the right people - you are favored and you do receive preferential treatment.

 

I've had good experiences and bad experiences with employers. Bad in the sense that I hated my job, and good in the sense that coming to work was fun more than anything. With the bad I was incompetent, lacking skills, etc., NOTHING was ever good enough even though I very well knew that I was doing a great job. I've had some good where I personally didn't think that I was truly qualified, or that I was doing a great job, but somehow I am on the fast track to the top with the contacts & relationships that I had in place basically because the right people liked me.

 

One more thing...my above point is with respect to Western culture and being liked by the right people, having the right network, etc. I have many family & friends in Eastern Europe, and there is an old joke there that goes:

 

'Can the colonel's son ever become a general?

 

Not if the general already has a son.'

 

In Europe, sans some parts of Western Europe, the family you are born into will determine your future. In Western culture, you can distinguish yourself with hard work, etc., but you still need the right contacts and relationships, which is really a sly form of nepotism IMO. Hard work alone won't get you there - you are favored and hoisted up.

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It's alive and well. Always has been and always will be.

 

You can work very hard, distinguish yourself, etc., but in the end, it all falls back on the relationships that you have in place with people, which can be a more subtle form of nepotism. The difference is in how it's spun; it's made to seem legitimate. You may have the skills in this case, but you're also hoisted up by the relationships that you have with the right people - you are favored and you do receive preferential treatment.

 

So because I do what I have been formally educated to do in an industry I have been exposed to my ENTIRE LIFE, but I happen to work for family my job only SEEMS legitimate?!?!?!?! If I worked for a competitor that was trying to bankrupt my family, then I would have your respect? pffffft.

 

You cannot say that everyone who works for family receives preferential treatment. It is just as often the case that MORE is expected/demanded of you precisely because you are the owners daughter/son. Don't make sweeping generalizations you cannot back up with facts. Frankly it's insulting.

 

We are all presented with different opportunities, aptitudes, obstacles and challenges. What we choose to do with that determines the outcome. I know MANY people who have worked for a family business (a few in my own case) and they DIDN'T get the sweet jobs, promotions etc. because they didn't work hard enough. It's because I do a good job. To belittle my work because I choose to stay and help my father build his business using my skills instead of using those skills to help some random stranger succeed doesn't make me lazy or incompetent.

 

Everyone thinks it's a walk in the park to be self-employed. I watched my father make sacrifices, take risks, succeed and fail, only to get back up and start over. Smart business people do not run their businesses with the "assistance" of incompetent relatives. Those who do, aren't self-employed for long.

 

I am resisting the temptation to justify my skills to you. It would be easy enough to do. But there's no point- you've made up your mind- no point in confusing you with facts. I have also realized over the years that some people would rather blame other for their own failure to thrive. It's easier to blame nepotism than one's own failure to seize opportunity...

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I guess I would expect that in a family owned business, but I work for a large company, thousands of employess through out the district.

 

Another example...The department that oversees my department had a job opening, a little different from my position but it was what they call a padded position meaning that no one could displace you from that position. Well the department's lead person somehow got her brother in that position even though he didn't have the senority for it. A few people fought the issue but in the end they made up some BS excuse that he was the only one qualified for the position and thereforee it was awarded to him. Each and everyone in this department would have been qualified since we all do pretty much the same thing.

 

IN a large company this should not even be allowed. That is appalling. You are not supposed to be able to report to, or have a family member report to you.

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