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online degree?


britt92084

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They are expensive, but if you can "get it" without any help, go ahead. In education, a degree from an online college is useless, but in some businesses they are accepted. Do your homework on this one. I earned a degree in nutrition management online several years ago and I couldn't beg a job with a degree from an online college.

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I want to work in occupational therapy. I want to get my OT assistant degree first, then work my way up to my masters *which would take a gazillion years *

 

when I move, I plan on working two jobs. the thing with me is I dont know if I would trust myself to stick to things and go online and get the job done. without that teacher there I 'd probably just set myself up to fail again *this is my second try at college*

 

 

I never really hear much about them... so I was just curious how they worked. But I am assuming that with something like occupational therapy... it's alot of hands -on stuff.

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wondering what that has to do with getting an online degree...

 

That an online degree is not worth the computer screen it is displayed on.

Many establishments look at where you got your degree as a sign of how reputable that place is.

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People assume you can't get a fully accredited degree online, but it is just not true.

 

You can get valid, university degrees from accredited universities these days fully online, from many established and well respected universities that offer both traditional campus classes and online degrees.

 

Google accredited online degrees or online education for more information on that. Another terms frequently used for online education is distance learning, so you can google that too.

 

You just have to make sure it is an accredited institution, and many state colleges and very good schools offer online programs. Some state schools offer fully online programs, and many also offer a combination of online and classroom curriculums.

 

You can now get A.A., B.A., B.S., and even Masters' degrees and Ph.Ds online from respected and accredited universities.

 

Many people who haven't done research into this assume you can get only the old fashioned 'correspondence courses' that not were accredited online. It's a different world nowadays, and online education is the future of education, since there are more adult students who take part time school at universities than young people who do a traditional fulltime degree on campus.

 

Here's a good place to start looking:

 

link removed

 

Some universities are expensive, but some are quite reasonable, and you can get a school loan to cover tuition if necessary, while learning in your own home and not having to pay room and board. I've known quite a few people who've gotten online degrees while working fulltime.

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I'd shoot for a program that offers a combo of online, classroom and hybrid courses. I've earned several degrees and while I enjoyed my online classes in certain ways, they were actually more work and more of a time investment than classroom learning. I felt as though I was paying large sums of money just for credits rather than an actual learning experience--I could have worked those courses entirely on my own for the price of the book had I not needed the credits. I resented that a bit.

 

I absorbed much more than I realized at the time during classroom sessions (with real people in them) and I enjoyed the friendships I cultivated there. I felt that I got at least some of my money's worth there--I wouldn't trade any of the classroom stuff.

 

If your program offers classes on weekends as opposed to night courses, this also made a huge difference for me. I enjoyed and absorbed a thousand times more in my Saturday sessions (fresh from bed) versus my night classes (after a full day's work) and the Saturday program was accelerated--the semesters were 6 weeks, not 12.

 

As for strictly online degrees; I believe they are generally respected as a way to augment one's primary degree, but on their own--not so much.

 

My best,

Cat

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Depends on the employer. If they're a snob they'll have wanted you to go and attend an old University for 4 years. If they're snobs and you are in the position to want to do an online degree chances are they would not have hired you anyway. I don't think there should be anything wrong so long as the degree is gotten from a recognised institution.

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Most online degrees from accredited universities today come from the same universities that offer residential classes on campus. So there is no way an employer even knows whether you took the classes online or on campus.

 

The thing they will notice is whether the school is accredited or not. Accreditation is the thing that separates a 'real' degree from one that is just training. So if the school is accredited it is no different than one you took on campus.

 

Please don't be dissuaded from getting a 4 year degree, Masters degree or Ph.D. online due to misinformation from many of the posters here. Do the research, and you'll see that if you want to get a degree online, you can, and it will be just as acceptable as a 4 year on campus degree if you choose the right college.

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It certainly depends on which university you get the degree from, but it also depends heavily on the subject. If someone gets an online PhD in English Literature from Yale (if such a thing exists), then fine (although I'm not sure your supervisor would be enormously happy at possibly never meeting you). If someone gets an online PhD in Neuroscience from Wherever Community College, then please don't apply to me for a job. The plain fact is, many subjects are (1) too difficult for someone to master entirely on their own, and (2) require practical skills and facilities which aren't available over a modem. Both of those facts severely limit the possibilities of online degrees. Where they're not applicable, fine. But where they are applicable, think long and hard before doing something that may not achieve what you want.

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It certainly depends on which university you get the degree from, but it also depends heavily on the subject. If someone gets an online PhD in English Literature from Yale (if such a thing exists), then fine (although I'm not sure your supervisor would be enormously happy at possibly never meeting you). If someone gets an online PhD in Neuroscience from Wherever Community College, then please don't apply to me for a job. The plain fact is, many subjects are (1) too difficult for someone to master entirely on their own, and (2) require practical skills and facilities which aren't available over a modem. Both of those facts severely limit the possibilities of online degrees. Where they're not applicable, fine. But where they are applicable, think long and hard before doing something that may not achieve what you want.

 

For a PHD yeah, but having studied a little bit of biology at undergraduate level I don't see why it could not be done online. Being able to operate a test tube is not something a person should be attending University to do. That could easily be taught on the job. In Australia most people are paid in some way to do their PHD's. Either they get a scholarship or they are paid to tutor.

 

Most Universities won't mention the fact that you graduated online, it'll just be a mode of attendance for the course.

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>> If someone gets an online PhD in Neuroscience from Wherever Community College, then please don't apply to me for a job.

 

ummm... no community college would offer a degree in neuroscience, so not an issue.

 

and colleges don't offer online degrees in fields that are not suitable for online instruction, but many such as computer science, business admin, etc. are.

 

And many online degrees require internships or practicuums with participating organizations. i.e., if you want a veterinary technician degree, part of the degree requires you to work in a cooperating vet practice under the tutelage of a vet.

 

People have many misconceptions about what online learning is/isn't, so do research on which degrees can be obtained online, and where.

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