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Depression and my friend


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Okay, so I'm talking to my friend. She has depression so she parties and sometimes gets drunk to try and get rid of the problems if even momentarily. She has told her friends that she doesn't need them. Her parents are trying to help but so far it's not working. She says drinking the problems away are "Better than nothing."

 

She's just hiding from her problems like a weak little child...

Any tips?

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"She's just hiding from her problems like a weak little child..".

 

First tip would be not to share that little thought with her.

 

Illnesses are not indicative of weak will, they are indicative of a medical problem.

 

First of all alcohol is a depressant, so until she quits drinking she really can not deal with her depression, if she is depressed.

 

She could also be using depression as an excuse to drink. As a person taking medication for depression myself, I can say that getting out and partying was way too much effort for me personally.

 

In fact isolation, not increased social activity is more the norm.

 

However if she really is depressed, then again, she needs to deal with the drinking first as you can not even take alcohol with certain medications. But, of course, she has to want to quit drinking otherwise she will not.

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Don't ever say that again. She is not weak. She has depression. An illness in the brain which affects the brain chemistry. Don't call her weak. She is not weak. You obviously have poor understanding about this. Look it up. It's not something that can be fixed easily. It's something that affects the persons life tremendously. It's something that can cause suicide. It's overwhelming. The feelings felt, the thoughts. Alcoholism is common in those with depression. She needs to see a doctor. A professional in mental health.

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I highly doubt she likes being depressed. Most of the time, depression becomes a part of someones life so they can't imagine life any other way. She can't see any light at the end of this tunnel. It's her comfort zone, sort of. Calling her parents would be a good idea because they can contact the right people or their doctor to possibly section her and assess her.

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Okay. She may feel reluctant, which is entirely normal, taking that pill will cause change, change + someone with a mental health problem = a struggle. Give her time. She will want to get better one day... and it's true, you can't help someone who doesn't want to be helped. Maybe showing her what life could be like without depression will help?

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You could ask her questions about her future. Maybe try and slide in a few good things about life. Children, love, dream job, friends and family, watching your child take his/her first steps, first words... little things count.

 

It's hard, and by no means should you be trying to be like a counselor to her. You are her friend, only so much a friend can do.

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Well I told her the weak little child and I highly doubt it affected her one bit.

Oh, she's depressed. If not can you tell me how two times, the ambulances have come by her house? She says that she'll be keeping her problems unsolved because everyone has problems.

 

There are many factors by which someone would commit suicide, assuming suicide attempts are what you are referring to.

 

Also alcohol as I said earlier is a depressant, so one could be covering the other.

 

You do not know if she is an alcoholic or depressed or depressed because she is an alcoholic, or an alcoholic that lies about being depressed in order to justify drinking.

 

If she is an alcoholic, no doubt that depresses her.

 

Alcoholics lie, in order to give themselves license to drink.

 

On the other hand as a person dealing with depression myself I rarely feel like whooping it up at the local pub. Quite the opposite, you would have to set the building on fire to get me to leave.

 

Also telling friends that want her to quit her lifestyle to bugger off, sounds much more the style of a substance abuser.

 

Depressives alienate themselves but can still maintain a relationship with close friends.

 

Alcoholics tend to use others around them and quickly rid themselves of those who will not facilitate their drinking.

 

 

In any case there is nothing you can do until she wants help.

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