Jump to content

Life-Changing Decision...


DakotaSkye

Recommended Posts

Here's the thing: I'm 22-years-old and I will be graduating from college in less than 4 weeks with a double major in art and art history. Currently, I work for a Home Health/Assisted Living/Group Home company in the Human Resources department. I was hired as a temp, mostly to do tasks such as filing, data entry, occasional reception, and miscellaneous related tasks. I started the beginning of June and have been working around 20-25 hours a week while going to school full-time. For about a week, I had subbed for the woman who normally does the staff scheduling. It was a little stressful, mostly because I have a hard time talking on the phone and working out problems. I get flustered under pressure, but I survived it for a week. Now I find out that the woman who does the scheduling is resigning as of next Friday and I've been (unofficially) offered her job. I will need a full-time job as soon as I graduate, but I don't know if this is the job for me. My mom is pushing me to either take the job because then I'd have health insurance, or continue my education ("maybe get a business degree") so I can continue to use my parents health insurance. My mom also thinks my degrees are useless, hence the business degree statement, so I know she's trying to get me to head in the same direction as her. And I don't want that. And if I stay in Human Resources, I would be going down the exact same path.

 

Keep in mind I was just offered the job yesterday and I need to make a decision before next Friday. I feel like I'm not prepared to make this decision, and I feel like, to my mom, it's all about health insurance! I understand it's important, but should I make this decision solely for that? I also know that this job will not pay as much as I would like to get (around $13 an hour), and I just don't know if it's worth it. Then again, with this economy, I feel like it would be completely stupid to just give it up when there are people out there who would give anything just to have a job. This decision is huge to me and I really have no one to discuss it with. I'd bring it up to my boyfriend, but he'd just bombard me with guilt, saying things like, "So you're going to want to stay around here for a while then," since he wants to move out of the city. Basically, he would be very little help and would offer very little useful advice, so I'm not really considering him in this decision.

 

This is definitely the biggest decision I've ever had to make, and I feel like a week is not enough time to make an informed decision. I don't know what to do. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey I'd say take the job why not. A job is not like buying a house you can quit anytime you want. Usually people take em and are constantly looking for better. Heck I know one person who has been applying the last 5 years and bouncing around from job to job. May not look good on the old resume but he seems to have no problems getting new ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you plan on doing if you don't take this job?

Why did you get your degrees in those areas in the first place? What do you envision as your career or a job when you do graduate?

 

If you have something else lined up or want to go for something else, then weigh the pros and cons.

 

If you don't really know, I don't think there's any harm in taking this job, afterall it is a paycheck, its something on your resume..it's a safe bet. You can always quit when something else comes along, but there's no point in giving up a job when there's nothing else really lined up, in my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey I'd say take the job why not. A job is not like buying a house you can quit anytime you want. Usually people take em and are constantly looking for better. Heck I know one person who has been applying the last 5 years and bouncing around from job to job. May not look good on the old resume but he seems to have no problems getting new ones.

 

Thank you. That might be what I have to do. It's not that it's a bad job, I'm just not sure whether I can do it well. It might be less stressful than searching for a new job, though, and then being trained into a new job. I hate that part the most...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What do you plan on doing if you don't take this job?

Why did you get your degrees in those areas in the first place? What do you envision as your career or a job when you do graduate?

 

If you have something else lined up or want to go for something else, then weigh the pros and cons.

 

If you don't really know, I don't think there's any harm in taking this job, afterall it is a paycheck, its something on your resume..it's a safe bet. You can always quit when something else comes along, but there's no point in giving up a job when there's nothing else really lined up, in my opinion.

 

Well, nothing at the moment. I got those degrees because, honestly, they are the only things I was really interested in. I knew I didn't want to be an accountant, or a doctor, or a lawyer, or a "business professional," so why would I go to school for them? I always loved art, and I'm good at it, so I might as well do everything I can to be successful at it. It's not likely that I'll succeed, I agree, but I wasn't just going to sit by and give it up because the odds were against me.

 

I was kind of hoping to try and do something in my field, whether that became an internship at a museum or a gallery, or an actual position where I can utilize my skills. I'm actually incredibly interested in building my own business, in which case the business degree would be really helpful. I don't have anything else lined up at the moment, but I've been so busy with work and school that I haven't had a chance to look.

 

I feel like if I take this job, I'll just be taking the easy way out and not pursuing what I really want to do. I'm afraid I'll be stuck here forever, and I'll never have a chance to spend the time needed to invest in a business of my own. I know it can be done, and I'll do whatever it takes to get there. If I don't succeed, it won't be because I didn't try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would take the job because it's an opportunity to learn something and get the experience. It may seem stressful because of taking on a position that is completely new. But, once you have learned and understand the position then you'll catch on and will become really easy for you. I was hired as a receptionist at a dealership in May and about 2 months later they asked me to take on another position of doing the daily deposits. I was worried that I would screw up or something would go wrong. But, I took the position and it was worth it because I got the experience with it.

 

Taking on new positions may be a little stress when you first start them. But, totally worth because you can put that on your resume.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you accept the job offer, it doesn't mean that you have to stop looking for jobs in galleries or museums. I'm not sure how far you are from Minneapolis or St. Paul-but there are a few museums there-have you sounded those areas out?

 

If you decide to accept the job offer, you can save some money and keep your eye out for museum jobs. Or save money and later continue your education at graduate school for a business/advanced art degree.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take it!! Even though its low pay, you don't have anything else lined up. .. and you admit you don't know what you want yet.

 

Has your boyfriend got a job somwhere else? if you moved where he wanted to go, would there be better empolyment opportunities?

 

You can't expect to graduate from university and walk into the perfect job right away. Even then, you ahve been working for them parttime so if you take it full time, even if only until you get something better, at least you have a paycheque coming in until you find that.

 

I may be wrong, but i doubt you will walk into a fulltime job at an art gallery. most people i know volunteer at art galleries or museums.. interpreter jobs are usually part time.

 

I say, take this job and volunteer at a gallery or get a Saturday job (if there is one) at a museum

 

Its nice to know you have a fulltime job waiting for you after you graduate!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you accept the job offer, it doesn't mean that you have to stop looking for jobs in galleries or museums. I'm not sure how far you are from Minneapolis or St. Paul-but there are a few museums there-have you sounded those areas out?

 

If you decide to accept the job offer, you can save some money and keep your eye out for museum jobs. Or save money and later continue your education at graduate school for a business/advanced art degree.

 

Yeah, I live near Minneapolis/St. Paul, in the northern suburbs. I've researched the opportunities at the Walker Art Center and the Mpls. Institute of Art a little bit, and most (if not all) are unpaid interships. Those positions are also highly competitive since there are only a few offered every year. I'm also afraid that if I don't go back to get another degree now, I never will. I guess the thing I'm most afraid of is getting stuck. Stuck in a position where I'll never be able to pursue my real goals, stuck and unable to go back to school... Right now, I can still depend on my parents for a lot of things, like food and helping me out with paying my bills and rent. When those things are completely up to me, I won't be able to save money as efficiently, and it's even less likely that I'll ever go back to school or start a business.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My boyfriend's got a job in the same city I do, but not by choice. He graduated with a teaching degree and was unable to find a job for 6 months. He finally took one at Huntington Learning Center part-time. He wants to be somewhere in rural northern Minnesota though, and honestly, so do I. But the opportunities will be even fewer then.

 

I've had crappy jobs before, believe me, but they didn't come with a lot of responsibility or stress, and they didn't require much skill. This job is far from crappy, but it definitely requires a specific kind of person. The thing I'm most concerned about with this position is that I feel like I won't do this job well. I'm not sure I'm a good fit for this particular position, and maybe that's just me doubting myself. Or maybe it's the truth.

 

Maybe I'll do better than I think, but I just don't know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been to the Walker Art Museum...it's nice! It's in your favor that you live near the city. Is there a possibility of even volunteering at the museums you've mentioned? You could work full time and maybe volunteer on a weekend day (as shikashika mentioned). It's a way of building up your resume, meeting contacts for future networking and reference opportunities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been to the Walker Art Museum...it's nice! It's in your favor that you live near the city. Is there a possibility of even volunteering at the museums you've mentioned? You could work full time and maybe volunteer on a weekend day (as shikashika mentioned). It's a way of building up your resume, meeting contacts for future networking and reference opportunities.

 

That might be a good option. I've considered it without really making a commitment, mostly because at this point in my life, it's hard for me to spend my precious freetime working when I'm not being paid. Maybe if I had fewer obligations and more time, I would, and maybe I will have more time. I'll just have to wait and see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That might be a good option. I've considered it without really making a commitment, mostly because at this point in my life, it's hard for me to spend my precious freetime working when I'm not being paid. Maybe if I had fewer obligations and more time, I would, and maybe I will have more time. I'll just have to wait and see.

 

It's a way of getting your foot in the door, meeting the movers and shakers of the industry and networking. You could meet people that have the same interest as you do. They also mentioned some social opportunities. I think it's a good start. Plus thinking about building a resume and gaining future references are good stategies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This opportunity looks interesting too:

 

link removed

 

Sometimes it's just getting that initial foot in the door. Jobs are often obtained by who you know and sometimes not so much what you know. You never know what an internship can turn into. Plus if you have something like this on your resume (along with references) it can serve as a springboard into something else-i.e. full time job in an area that you were educated in and enjoy. .Note that the deadline to get the application in is on November 15th (This Saturday--you still got a chance).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take the job then go to school for human resources. Your pulled in your direction for a reason. I got pulled into finance/accounting, and I was a music major. I'm still getting pulled in that direction even though I was studying something else. Now I've decided to study management/finance in hopes of getting promoted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may love art, but as an adult you do have to find a way to support yourself. So your task first as an adult is supporting yourself, and then finding a way to also do what you enjoy as much as possible.

 

So your first task is finding out how long your parents will continue to support you while you find yourself or a career. The fact that your mother is encouraging you to take a job and steering you towards careers where there are lots of jobs where one can support oneself leads me to belief she is not going to keep paying your expenses for a long time. She is gently trying to let you know that you're an adult and you need to support yourself and you do need to think about practical things like health insurance because she won't be paying for it forever.

 

So yes, you love art, but how practical is that in terms of translating to a job that earns enough money to support yourself? Most people who go into art also have other degrees or jobs besides just art. For example, you could get a teaching certificate to teach art to kids, while doing the art you love on the side and selling what you can.

 

I dated an artist, and unfortunately being a successful artist who is not engaged in some kind of professional endeavor (like advertising or teaching) is rare because you don't earn enough money to support yourself. So you have to be realistic about that and realistic about the number of jobs available to someone who does an art related job (and the odds of you finding one). So do some serious research into whether you will be able to get a 'pure' art job or earn enough as an artist to support yourself.

 

Next, you say you want art, but your boyfriend wants to live somewhere rural. Usually people in art gravitate to metro centers like NYC or Seattle to find jobs in galleries or museaums. So if you want to live in a rural area, unless you do something else, or already are a successful artists with a gallery selling your work, living in a rural area means you have to do something else. Perhaps if you got a teaching certificate, you could teach art in school in a rural area.

 

But really, the job that is available to you offers you a LOT of future potential, in that health care is a booming area. You could work anywhere and take your experience in that and work in a health care setting anywhere, while doing your art on the side.

 

Regarding starting your own business, most people want to do that, but very few do straight out of school. Where is the capital to start it? Most people spend years not earning anything, and in fact, losing money, and 3 out of 4 businesses fail before they ever earn any money. Most people who succeed spend years working for others until they have either the capital or the experience to run a business. So that really isn't a very practical idea at this point in time, UNLESS you start the business on the side with a regular job, using the job to provide money until your business is a success (if it is a success).

 

So i think you need to be very practical at this point and consider taking that job until you are sure you know what you can do that earns money, or you land a job in the art field. And if you do want to move with your boyfriend, having an art degree and no other job skills in a rural area won't earn you enough money to live, so it is better to have skills that translate into a job at a nursing home or hospital.

 

You can always do your art, but you do have to support yourself. Your other alternative is to find someone who is willing to support you while you don't work, but that is always risky in that if that person dumps you, you have no skills and no prospects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just thought I'd give you all an update. I decided to take the position. Or at least express that I would like to be considered as a candidate. I believe they still plan on interviewing other people (especially since they put an ad in the paper) but I guess I've been added to the pool of prospective candidates. I was thinking about it last night and just decided to do it. Even if it's not the right decision, at least it feels good to have made a decision and to have a plan. I dunno. I might regret it later, but for now, I'm ok.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

most college graduates are worrying about the same things.

 

The question you must answer is:

Should I make a decision based on fear or passion? Fear that if I don't take the job i won';t have healthcare coverage and not have an income. Hard to let it pass now that this country along the world is in perpetual recession and unemployment rates are in double digits.

Passion because i love taking care of sick people or because I love art and I think I can live without it regardless of low pay. I believe most artist start out being dirt poor and still pursue their dream of being able to express whatever they want to express through their canvass or wat not.

 

If there is a demand people will pay to get it regardless of which field you are in. so you don't have to be a cookie cutter businesswomen to make money.

In your free time you should check link removed it is a database of famous people in the world that made an impact and analizes what made them where they are now today and I know not all of them have mba's

 

I am on the same boat so what i am doing is to go to china and survive. dont know the language and nobody to turn to. just taking risks that someday it'll yield results.

 

goodluck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...