Jump to content

Is putting freelance work on your resume sometimes a bad idea?


Double J

Recommended Posts

I'm in Marketing Communications and I try emphasizing my writing experience on my resume as much as possible.

 

I've done some freelance work in the past and was wondering if it's a bad idea to highlight this if you're pursuing a full-time job. It might add bulk to the resume, but the employer might be left wondering whether you might decide to pursue freelance work on the side without telling them. (Some employment contracts expressly state that you are not to work for yourself or any other employer should you accept their offer.)

 

It seems like it'd be something good to do if you're in journalism or other related fields, but maybe it can somehow backfire. I think some companies are averse to freelancers.

 

Has anyone been in this situation?

 

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm, i moonlight as a DJ on the weekends and i never put that on my resume. As you stated in your post, i think that employers would see this as a conflict of interest. If you did the freelancing as part of a full-time work routine, then it may be a good idea to list it as "consultancy" work just to use up the space, but i think that, on the whole, it's better to have a clean looking resume.

 

On the other hand though, if you'd won prizes or awards for your writing as a freelancer, it would be a good idea to list them, perhaps all under one heading?

 

Or, you might want to consider listing all your freelance work under one heading, rather than dispersing it chronologically throughout your resume. But, then again, this would lead to the above-mentioned problems.

 

PS. I have this problem as well as i have a failed business i need to list on my resume, lol.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I had a problem with this once.

 

I am in high tech. I had a side business where a partner and I filed a provisional patent on an idea I had and we were trying to raise money. I was interviewing for another position as an engineer where I would be a contractor - not a permanent employee.

 

I mentioned it when I was asked if I had any experience with patents and intellectual property. For some reason the hiring manager got it into his head that my filing patents in this business was going to impact what he was doing - i.e. create a conflict of interest.

 

He brought it up when he called me to offer the job. I thought it was weird because the patents my partner and I had filed had NOTHING to do with the area that his company was working. (Mine were related to email, this company was doing a video project - so totally different.)

 

Anyway, I explained why there wasn't a conflict and I got hired. I should have taken it as a warning sign though that the guy was not that smart. He ended up really driving his division of the company into the ground and the entire group got canned (they kept him though last I heard). I should have not taken the job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a freelance writer. I guess it is generally a bad idea, but there is a catch. Perhaps the question is are you successful? Or do you feel comfortable with yourself? As true mind is exiled under the tyrany of default psyche, monnlighting is the real deal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, I don't see it as a problem. I freelanced for 10 years and it helped me get salaried jobs. The key is to have a portfolio (print and/or online) that shows your work, so you look professional. I'm not sure how it works with writing, but my guess is that you could have some examples of your work and detail your experience with style guides. I have some experience with editing and know that employers want to know if you can use the Chicago Manual of Style or AP Style Guide. I have friends who do freelance writing and they've gotten full time, salaried jobs as editors, copy writers, technical writers, project managers, etc. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally, I don't see it as a problem. I freelanced for 10 years and it helped me get salaried jobs. The key is to have a portfolio (print and/or online) that shows your work, so you look professional. I'm not sure how it works with writing, but my guess is that you could have some examples of your work and detail your experience with style guides. I have some experience with editing and know that employers want to know if you can use the Chicago Manual of Style or AP Style Guide. I have friends who do freelance writing and they've gotten full time, salaried jobs as editors, copy writers, technical writers, project managers, etc. Good luck!

 

Good idea!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is nothing wrong with putting them on your resume.

 

 

I've kept some of mine on as there was a period of about 3 years in the city I lived a few years back, where it was very rare to be able to get a fulltime job. The only jobs that were out there were 3 month or 7 month contracts. Even then, when I was working contract jobs, there were times where it would be 3-4 weeks before the next one started and I always tried to make sure that I was working at all times, even if my temp job was (for lack of a better word) 'beneath me'.

 

When I have left gaps ( of very short periods, like 2-4 weeks) I said that I had been doing some temp jobs during that time and it was always well-received.

 

People like someone who is willing to pick up any type of work rather than sitting at home waiting for something to come along.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

There's totally nothing wrong with it...As long as you don't mix the two jobs together. I've been freelancing and I have my full time job too. And I made sure my freelance writing services are intact and it has nothing to do with the company I'm working with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...