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"The Grass Is Greener" Syndrome


Mayday11
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Excellent post Mayday11.

 

I have been in a few "the grass is greener" break ups before. And I've noticed one distinct problem with the reconciliation. The fact that usually, when they come back, their standards have risen because of the time apart.

 

This is due in part because of them sampling other things and actually finding things they like. One of my exs and I started talking, and then the conversation completely dropped when she asked if I owned a car. I don't. Her last boyfriend owned a 2005 Mustang. I have saved money and have enjoyed leisure reading time by taking the metro to work and to see her.

 

I @#$% you not. She asked this question and then didn't speak a word to me when I said no.

 

Sometimes, the grass is a little greener on the otherside. What she sees over there can still effect her, raise her standards and make her want and demand more out of you. NC is beneficial this way- improving ourselves is a tremendous pay off later. If they leave us and come back to find us with a better job, much thinner, smarter with money, more educated, etc, etc, etc, they realize that they really missed out.

 

Is it fair? That's hard to say. I'm not her monkey- I don't buy a car, least of all a Mustang, to impress her. My monkey's in my picture. And to eagerly accept her back just gives the impression that she could leave and come back whenever she wants, turning me into a revolving door. Even if sex is involved. If you ask me, the real "unconquered territory" of this forum should be, what should I do when (not if) they contact me again to win them back?

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not to burst anyone's bubble... but, the reasons listed here for a breakup for someone in their 20's is kind of bogus. sure, i think it happens - i think people do think that the 'grass is greener' per se - but, mostly, this is what happens in any break up.

 

1- Reasons for the break up are contradicting or sound like the dumper is grasping at straws for reasons. As if they are trying to convince themselves of it, too.

well, sometimes people don't like you anymore.

 

2- Not much warning that something is going on before the actual break.

i don't know what you expect here.... ' hey, jim, going to break up with yoiu in 3 days at about 7 pm. ok? cool. see you then!! i'll pack the picnic basket!!'

 

 

3- An extreme change in lifestyle, such as suddenly starting to drink a lot, party a lot and hang around people they normally wouldn't.

hanging around with people they normally wouldn't??? as in... not you? yeah - that happens when you break up. you're no longer their center of attention. get used to it.

 

4- Wishy-washiness on the part of the dumper. They love you, but aren't IN love with you. They say that this doesn't mean you two are over forever and maybe someday down the road you'll be together again. At the same time, they'll tell you to move on.

this is someone's way of saying, 'i'm over you, i hope you can get over me and i don't want to hurt you more than i already have.'

 

 

5- Quickly entering new relationships with people they aren't very compatible with.

ummm... they're not compatible in YOUR mind. how many people look at the next relationship an ex gets into and says, 'they're much better off than when they were with me.' i doubt many. to do so would be to downplay the significance of your 'bond' with them and thus substantially reduce any possibility in your mind of them coming back.

 

 

all things being said, i feel like the above 5 things have happened to me. but, they've happened to me in all break ups i've been in because the description is quite simply of that - a breakup.

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1- Yes, but WHY don't they like you? Because they see something they want to try? Everything happens for a reason.

 

2- As opposed to a gradual decline in communication, a slow loss in interest, etc, etc. You know, that thing that disappears over six months.

 

3- Annnnd it happens when you're ABOUT to break up. Not necessarily immediately after it.

 

4- Yes.

 

5- Stop. Let's face it. How often do people make good decisions when faced with feelings of guilt? Rarely. Sure, it may sound bitter to judge the next person they dive into a relationship with, but that's with the assumption that they are of sound mind when they do. They rarely are. Dumpers are NOT immortal beings, breaking up hurts them too. They're called "rebounds", and they're rarely the best choice.

 

Everything happens for a reason. If they let you go, it's because they're looking for something better, either now or sometime soon. But being lazy enough to assume that all break ups are the same is breathing in a sense of inevitability.

 

Personally, I'd prefer to grab life by the gorilla love handles and hump it into submission. And grasping the psychological workings of certain forms of relationships can do much to help reduce them.

 

Your counterpoints just strike me as bitter because of your previous relationships ending. I've had relationships end for the above reason. I've also had relationships end on fairly logical decisions such as they're moving away, or we both mutually agree we are not compatible. Does getting dumped hurt? @#$% yeah. Rarely do we see it coming and even when we do, we usually scramble to put more effort into the relationship to save it, instead of pulling away and making them work to reclaim what's theirs (or preparing ourselves for singledom again).

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no shiz... of course they're looking for something better - maybe even something more of a sure bet.

 

i'm not so much bitter as it is an understanding of being broken up with. listen, i can't say i didn't lend a helping hand to the outcome of my numerous break ups - but, in the end... fact remains - when someone breaks up with you, you can read into it as much as you want... i can psychologically pick apart any situation with any girl i've ever been with - at the end of the day, i could probably convince each and every girl to come back. in fact, i have - and, it wasn't through NC.

 

it was by understanding their fears/concerns in a relationship and working through them together. sure... rebounds are not the best situation for a dumper to be in - but, they're even worse for the dumpee, wouldn't you agree? i feel like NC works to an extent - but, understanding why someone breaks up with you is of paramount importance.

 

even if there is no gradual decline in communication... i can assure you that when people break up, the one doing the breaking up has been thinking about it for a while. its not just a 'hey, let's break up after coffee' type thing. they're thinking about it a lot and have begun to distance themselves... yet, don't want you to pick up this. so, they distance.... more and more - while at the same time trying to be as outwardly normal appearing as they can. some do it better than others. when i emotionally start to detract from a relationship, it is very obvious. my ex, on the other hand, hid it well. but, i'm sure she was backing away slowly on the inside...

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not to burst anyone's bubble... but, the reasons listed here for a breakup for someone in their 20's is kind of bogus. sure, i think it happens - i think people do think that the 'grass is greener' per se - but, mostly, this is what happens in any break up.

 

Hey, poloace,

 

Thanks for your addition to the thread. I do respectfully disagree with what you've said, although your opinion on the matter is no less valid than anyone else's. The things I've listed have not been common things in the breakups that have happened to me and people I know. Let me explain.

 

1- Reasons for the break up are contradicting or sound like the dumper is grasping at straws for reasons. As if they are trying to convince themselves of it, too.

well, sometimes people don't like you anymore.

Well, sure, but there are usually identifiable reasons for the incompatibility and loss of love. Too much arguing brought about by personality conflicts or different goals in life, for example.

2- Not much warning that something is going on before the actual break.

i don't know what you expect here.... ' hey, jim, going to break up with yoiu in 3 days at about 7 pm. ok? cool. see you then!! i'll pack the picnic basket!!'

In the majority of breakups, the dumper will usually tend to give off plenty of red flags and warning signs leading up to the breakup. These include not spending much time with you, not being available, not saying "I love you", a complete lack of intimacy, increased irritability with you, etc. My point here is that the warning signs don't exist at all, or they only show up a day or so before the breakup.

3- An extreme change in lifestyle, such as suddenly starting to drink a lot, party a lot and hang around people they normally wouldn't.

hanging around with people they normally wouldn't??? as in... not you? yeah - that happens when you break up. you're no longer their center of attention. get used to it.

If you're in a relationship with someone for years or have known someone for even longer, you'll have a pretty good idea of what sort of friends they have and what sort of social circles they tend to gravitate towards. So, yes, if you know someone well, you'll surely notice when they're keeping company with people that they normally wouldn't. In the majority of my breakups, after I had been dumped, the dumper would continue to live life as normal, hanging out with the same friends they had before. In these particular types of breakups, it's not uncommon to see the dumper go off and almost completely re-invent their social circle.

4- Wishy-washiness on the part of the dumper. They love you, but aren't IN love with you. They say that this doesn't mean you two are over forever and maybe someday down the road you'll be together again. At the same time, they'll tell you to move on.

this is someone's way of saying, 'i'm over you, i hope you can get over me and i don't want to hurt you more than i already have.'

...which is usually what they'll actually say, in my experience. As much as it hurts, the breakups where the dumper actually says "It's not going to work out between us and that's that" have been more common to me and ultimately easier to come to terms with.

 

5- Quickly entering new relationships with people they aren't very compatible with.

ummm... they're not compatible in YOUR mind. how many people look at the next relationship an ex gets into and says, 'they're much better off than when they were with me.' i doubt many. to do so would be to downplay the significance of your 'bond' with them and thus substantially reduce any possibility in your mind of them coming back.

Like I said, if you've been in a long term relationship with someone, you'll know them quite well. It's not too difficult to figure out what sort of person would be compatible with them and which ones would not. And yes, I've had exs move onto boyfriends that are much better for them than I was. In fact, just this weekend I was hanging out with an ex from years ago and her boyfriend. He's an awesome guy and they have a much better relationship than she and I did.

all things being said, i feel like the above 5 things have happened to me. but, they've happened to me in all relationships i've been in because the description is simply of that - a breakup.

The majority of breakups I've seen do not fit the description that I outlined. The majority of breakups on this site don't fit the description that I outlined. As I mentioned already, my opening post was put together from my personal experience and the experience of people I've known, so I'm certainly no authority on the matter. However, I have no reason to believe that this is not a unique type of breakup.

 

Once again, thanks for the rebuttal.

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mayday,

 

i agree with some of your statement and psychological assessment to an extent. the 3 breakups i've had have been with girls in their early 20's .... this most recent on e on the verge of her 25th after 3 years.

Yea, the majority of breakups I've had, I've been able to say "Yea, she was a great girl, but...(fill in reasons for never being able to really be a good match)." It's a tough pill to swallow, but once you reach a point where you can actually review the relationship with a clear head and realize that it wouldn't ever have worked out, the healing process kicks into overdrive. But, then there's the rare breakup where even after a period of reflection and review, you're still left scratching your head.

so, in the situation - are you still a proponent of NC?

Yea, I'm always a proponent of a period of NC at first and this is no different. This "I'm young and don't know what I want" thing can last months or years. No use in waiting around for a reconciliation. You just have to let things play out naturally for them while you get on with your life. After they start to settle down, they may come back to what they let go (you) if you gave them the space and time they needed. But, it's necessary to deal with the trust issues if reconciliation is going to happen. Being dumped out of the blue from a mostly good and loving relationship can do quite a bit to turn a level headed person into a paranoid partner.

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Okay I read the thread and will add my 2 cents.

 

This break up dynamic is in no way unique to age.

 

Go back and read my sad story, to save time my ex gf did this at 45 years old, with a toe in menopause, and hid her feelings like an actress until she dumped me.

 

Her instant-rebound is with someone perhaps not the best choice, and she is not of all that sound mind. There have been very slight signs through very LC that she has developed a slight bit of interest in my future plans, after demanding NC forever.

 

Go figure.

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Okay I read the thread and will add my 2 cents.

 

This break up dynamic is in no way unique to age.

 

Go back and read my sad story, to save time my ex gf did this at 45 years old, with a toe in menopause, and hid her feelings like an actress until she dumped me.

 

Her instant-rebound is with someone perhaps not the best choice, and she is not of all that sound mind. There have been very slight signs through very LC that she has developed a slight bit of interest in my future plans, after demanding NC forever.

 

Go figure.

 

Yes, I remember your situation. It's one of the toughest ones I've seen around here.

 

What I listed above is intended to be a general outline of things I've noticed about this sort of breakup. Because of this, there will always be plenty of exceptions here and there, due to the uniqueness of each relationship and the people involved within them.

 

But, no matter what, the hurt and confusion remains the same.

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I knew this was going to be a good thread as soon as I read the title and saw the poster, haha.

 

It's been a few months now since I've been dumped, and I definitely think that this could be the reason. A good long term relationship, breakup completely out of the blue (from my perspective at least), contradicting reasons, the "ILYBNILWY" line, ex quickly entering new relationship, etc., etc. Pretty much every point in the first post is there. Hell, he actually even used the term "quarter life crisis".

 

Indeed the hardest part in accepting that it was over was because I had no idea why. I felt like if there were as an actual identifiable reason for the breakup, I would have been able to listen a little better when he told me I needed to move on, instead of just sitting there so confused and hurt like I did.

 

I haven't had any contact with him in over a month now, and I'm doing much, MUCH better. Getting to the "acceptance" stage in this type of breakup is certainly an ordeal (though that's not to say that it isn't in other types of breakups as well), but I'm glad to say that I think I finally made it.

 

But, I do have a question. Mayday, you mentioned how it can be hard for the dumpee to trust that the dumper won't leave them out of the blue again if they do come back. Although I believe I would like to attempt reconciliation if the opportunity presents itself in the future, I fear that I might become paranoid that the allure of "greener pastures" will strike once again. It isn't something I'm losing sleep over by any means, but the thought has crossed my mind a few times. Do you have any tips on how someone should deal with this? This is no small order, I know, but any advice you (or anyone) could give would be much appreciated.

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I'm having a hard time trying to figure out if my ex has this syndrome or not, because in all honesty I don't believe in anything she said (which is why I said goodbye). But I do have a few questions, if there is any advice on these. Keep in mind, despite part of me still having hope, most of me is beginning to accept that its over.

 

A. Does this apply to exes that date multiple partners after breaking up? My ex left me for another dude (didn't cheat on me with him, but just like...left. Asked for a break, which I assumed was a break up.) I gave her space, but on the condition that she see neither me nor the other guy. A couple days later I find out she is still seeing him (while we're on a break), justifies it by saying that she knows who I am, but still needs to see what she feels for in this new guy. I freak out for a week, she dumps me.

 

After she dumped the new guy a month-ish later, I asked if she wanted to try and work things out between us again. She wanted to date others, I gave up after I found out she was hooking up with another guy (and probably more than that) two weeks after dumping the assumed rebound.

 

B. Does it matter how I initiated NC? After our final fight (I got angry outta frustration, the fact that she would get angry with me if I ignored her) I wrote her a long email about why I had been ignoring her, acting distant. I told her that we couldn't be friends, wished her good luck, told her I just wanted for the two of us to be happy. I told her that it seems we're both happier now (I'm healthier, but still depressed. She seems to be better off.) and that I told her that the two of us breaking up was probably a good idea (no idea why I said this. But I guess it made me sound like I wasn't needy for her anymore. I had begged for her to come back a few weeks after we broke up, and I wanted to at least show that I wasn't gonna keep doing that.) She replied (a little annoyed about things, but short and to the point) that she wished the same for me, and said good luck. Neither of us said goodbye to each other, but it was essential a goodbye email. That was the last time I talked to her, about three weeks ago.

 

I don't know. I can't tell if I just closed the door on any chances of her trying to reconcile things by doing that, but I did it more for me than for us. It hurt a lot to get random IMs that were things that I didn't want to her. I posted earlier in this thread about my situation. I'm doing better, but I still have my moments. And I don't get her at this point.

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Mayday GREAT post. I have read many of your posts on this board and I'm sure like many others I hope you continue to give your advice and stay around these forums for a while.

 

I think what you have to say applies to a lot of people and you say it well. Your advice has definitely put my mind at ease and given me a much more positive perspective on the breakup.... which is not to say it is a great one but hey its MUCH more positive. Thanks!

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Anyway, as it has been said in these forums, we just can't sit and wait.

Yes, my ex's behavior fits a lot of things people said, and the same people said that this kind of dumper often comes back.

 

But what if it takes a year or more until they come back? Or even worse, what if they never come back? Although we want them back, we can't wait for them to come back. We have to live our lives as if we were sure they won't ever return. Then, in the end, if they do come back, we have a choice: we try to work things out, or we just realise we are better without them.

 

I know, easier said than done. I'm going through this too. It's very hard in the beginning to accept this, but it gets easier (less hard, I'd say). It's hard for me to come home after work knowing she won't be there waiting for me. But that's reality now, and I must get used to it.

 

The contradiction kills me...to get her back, I must leave her alone.

 

I still hope that, some months from now, she will miss me to the point of wanting to try again. But that's what I hope for. I don't know what she hopes for. And, since the break up is so fresh (almost 2 months), I don't think she's thinking about me the way I'd like to hear. Whatever, enough about me.

 

Heal. Don't think they will come back. When you think you're ready, go find someone new. If they ever come back, you decide if you both will get back together.

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It really helps me to read this post as it is right on the mark. Very insightful.

 

1. Reasons for breakup changes

2.My xbf and I dated for 3.3 years with no big arguments or prior breakups

3. Wishy-washy: one minute he is begging for me back and the next he wants to date others. Tells me to date others but when he start to think that I am, he gets jealous.

4. He slept with other girls right after we broke up and he knew he wasn't compatible with her

5. Dramatic changes in lifestyle: buy clothes he doesn't really wear before, goes to clubs/bar more than ever, even picks up girls from there. These are all things he always tells me he hated when we were together.

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Thought I might add my perspective on this as someone who was dumped due to grass is greener syndrome, but has pretty much recovered and healed from it.

 

This theory of why people break up should not ever be used as a reason to hang on to hope that the ex will come back. Just because someone dumped because they felt the grass is greener, it doesn't mean they'll want you back, whatever happened to their subsequent relationship(s).

 

But...it is an extremely useful theory when you apply it to your situation, find it's the same and have a good sense of closure about why you were dumped. After all, 'G.I.G.S' leaves the dumpee thinking it wasn't their fault...which is in fact the case in a lot of break-ups, especially this type.

 

G.I.G.S strikes anyone who is emotionally immature, whatever age. While it's most common is women in their early to mid twenties, it can happen later than this. Mine was 28 for instance.

 

And I've heard of this syndrome happening a lot of times...but it never seems to be something men do. I'm sure there are examples, but I've never heard of one personally.

 

If reconcilliation ever happens after this has all taken place, it'll only ever work years later. The dumper suffering from G.I.G.S has to grow up and change into a mature adult...This takes a loooooooong time.

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But, I do have a question. Mayday, you mentioned how it can be hard for the dumpee to trust that the dumper won't leave them out of the blue again if they do come back. Although I believe I would like to attempt reconciliation if the opportunity presents itself in the future, I fear that I might become paranoid that the allure of "greener pastures" will strike once again. It isn't something I'm losing sleep over by any means, but the thought has crossed my mind a few times. Do you have any tips on how someone should deal with this? This is no small order, I know, but any advice you (or anyone) could give would be much appreciated.

 

If they eventually do come back, it's certainly going to be the hardest issue to overcome. Because if they come back, it's going to be due to one of two reasons:

 

  • They're out of this phase and didn't like what else was out there as much as they liked you.
  • They think they're out of the phase.

 

And, unfortunately, there's no real way of knowing which is the reason they're back. If they're coming back just a few months after the breakup, you can almost be sure they haven't gotten everything out of their system.

 

Communication is key, of course, but this won't really help much because this sort of breakup strikes even the most well communicated relationships.

 

Basically, it just comes down to whether you want to take a chance with your heart again. But, then again, you're taking a chance with your heart in any relationship you enter into.

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This theory of why people break up should not ever be used as a reason to hang on to hope that the ex will come back. Just because someone dumped because they felt the grass is greener, it doesn't mean they'll want you back, whatever happened to their subsequent relationship(s).

 

I completely agree. While I personally have a more optimistic view on reconciliations that a lot of people around here, I'd also hate to feed people false hope. There are a lot of hurting people around here that will naturally tend to latch onto what they want to hear, rather than what they need to hear.

 

Let me reiterate, as said above, that no one knows if an ex is going to come back in just about any situation. Sometimes they really are just gone forever.

 

But, I did want to add that part in the opening post to make my experience (and the experience with others) on these types of relationships complete as possible for everyone. Compared to breakups due to incompatibilities, cheating, abuse, constant fighting, etc., these sorts of breakups tend to reconcile more often (not all the time). Most likely because these sorts of breakups often happen to couples that really do go well together and are compatible, the only reason for the breakup was one of the people wasn't quite mature enough to handle things getting serious. Once they reach the point where they're comfortable with that(which will naturally happen over time), they may realize that there's no real reason not to be together.

 

But by that point, the damage is often already done, the trust has disintegrated and the dumpee has moved onto other things themselves.

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Been with my girl for over 8 yrs, since she was 17 so now she is 25. I was her first ever bf. Grew up together, shared alot of good times. Were both poor college sweetharts at one point but both made it out of school and became professionals. Recently engaged (she hinted at it) and happy (well I was) even built a home together and furnished just the way we liked it.

 

It was about 3 months ago when the grass is greener syndrome hit full force and she left me (showed all the symptoms Mayday listed). Its unbelievable how strong this syndrome is because I know that deep down inside she knows that she left such a good thing to explore the other side. Everything was good and she knows it, but its just that her heart tells her differently. Basically she sacrificed everything we had together to satisfy her intuition.

 

Recently, she returned back to our home for the first time in over 2 months since she left to discuss what we were going to do with our condo. I could see that she misses my company, the peaceful day to day life we had, and our home that we built together, yet at the same time, the Grass is Greener syndrome still seems to have the best of her. She looked completely frustrated, confused, total labile affect. One minute crying and next minute having that smirk like she has something better out there waiting for her. She tells me that she's just been partying, living free and has been dating around. Its madness, complete lifestyle change. She's having a really tough time finding equilibrium which i believe as someone stated as "emotional maturity".

 

Yes I do agree, with Mayday on this post because I am witnessing first hand. Very frustrating and hurtful but nothing I can do.

 

Only the future will tell..............

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Being the victim of this syndrome... Grass is greener... my ex and her partner broke up recently, she contacted me right after the breakup, I responded. I still do have romantic feelings for her, but I know deep down.. no matter how hard we try or do, it's never going to be the same. I have lost that something special, trust. It's gonna be real hard for her to earn it back. I just want to move on, and be there for her as a friend.

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Thank you sooo much for this post!!

The timing on this couldn't be anymore perfect for my personal situation...

 

You described exactly what I am feeling/going through...

 

I just left my fiance of 2 years... We lived in his house, the relationship progressed very quickly from the start.. After we got engaged my doubts grew and I was petrified to think about marrying him...

 

I have only been in 1 other long-term.. and dated maybe 1-2 other men semi-seriously before my fiance...... So while I feel I may have the "Grass is Greener" syndrome, I think we need to look at our past experiences and see if we are making any repetitive patterns/mistakes....

 

I haven't ... For me I have just been growing/changing, and going through a hard transitional phase right now at 26.

My fiance is 33...and like other "dumpees" he is kind of waiting around for me to make up my mind...

It has been a month now.. We still talk, and see each other here & there.

He suspects I have been talking to other guys.. And he's right

I had a rebound already also

 

I just felt alot of the relationship for me was based on security (financial) and comfort.... Something felt missing over 50% of the time...

I still am really afraid and am seeing a counsellor hoping that I am making the right decision.

 

My situation may be a little clearer to outsiders... As many people never liked my fiance. He has a very macho/aggressive look, and some people close to me have seen me in tears many times because of all the fights we had, his controlling behaviors, temper, jealousy.... So most can understand WHY I may be afraid to make a lifetime commitment to him...

 

But we often get clouded.. and all our of reasons start to not make sense because we have so much emotion going on... It's not easy being the "dumper"... Like the post mentioned, we are just as confused!!!! We don't want to feel this way....... I just want to wake up and it be all a bad dream and be miraculously happy.

 

I guess all I can say to others in my shoes, is listen to your gut.... Listen to your body....

I don't understand what I am going through, but my body has been telling me for a LONG time now.... I went on depression meds, lost alot of weight, couldn't sleep, lots of anxiety..

And I must say, my symptoms are not gone YET.. But I feel like my old self sometimes these days!! I'm smiling and laughing again!

I have been going on dates and I feel so confident, happy and getting those butterflies again!

 

Just hang in there, and please share your experiences... It helps hearing what others are going through in a similar situation...

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Thanks for your insight, roxy1234.

 

My good friend dumped his girlfriend for these exact reasons years ago. After about a year, they did get back together and are now happily married.

 

To this very day, he has difficulty verbalizing his reasons for the breakup. He says he was young, loved his girlfriend very much, but wasn't sure if he was supposed to be so committed and that he felt a yearning to see what else was out there. He almost sounds embarrassed talking about it, since today he's a very well rounded and level headed guy.

 

It's a very confusing and painful type of breakup for everyone involved. While it hurts a lot for the dumpee, it also hurts a lot for the dumper and everyone needs to keep that in mind. After all, the relationship isn't ending due to it necessarily being a bad relationship, it's ending because of a reason the dumper can't quite put their finger on. A lot of the time, the dumper will almost think there is something wrong with them because there should be no reason for them to want to end a perfectly good relationship.

 

But, there isn't anything wrong with them, this is simply a phase that some people go through. It's a phase that needs to be gone through, because if one just keeps putting it off and putting off, it'll eventually catch up to them. Another phrase I've heard from dumpers in these sorts of situations is "I guess it's better that it happened now instead of years from now" (which was a phrase that always confused me, because it implies that they could still see themselves still with you years from now. But, it's completely at home with the rest of this confusing breakup).

 

Just hang in there, roxy1234. You do what you need to do to figure out who you are and who you want to be with. It will make your next relationship that much more complete, whether it's with someone new or your ex-fiancee.

 

Good luck.

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  • kamurj changed the title to "The Grass Is Greener" Syndrome

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