Facebook share
LinkedIn share
Google plus share
Twitter plus share
Give Advice
Ask For Advice
Page 18 of 19 FirstFirst ... 1516171819 LastLast
Results 171 to 180 of 187

Thread: How are you dealing with the changes brought about by this pandemic?

  1. #171
    Forum Supporter Fudgie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Age
    31
    Posts
    15,470
    Gender
    Female
    I feel the same way, Fenix. I too live alone and have a very stable, secure job although I'm not WFH. I'm in healthcare but not in a hospital thank God.

    So many people are suffering... Physically, financially, emotionally, etc. I am struggling emotionally with being isolated from my family for large swaths of time but overall, I am one of the lucky ones. I always try to keep that in mind.

  2. #172
    Platinum Member LaHermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    2,510
    Gender
    Female
    From WHO.

    "The World Health Organization hopes the coronavirus crisis will be over in less than two years, according to WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

    The Spanish flu that affected the world back in 1918 took two years to end, he said.

    "Our situation now with more technology, of course with more connectiveness, the virus has a better chance of spreading, it can move fast," added the WHO chief.

    "At the same time we have the technology and knowledge to stop it."

    He said that by "utilising the available tools to the maximum and hoping that we can have additional tools like vaccines, I think we can finish it in a shorter time than the 1918 flu"."


    And then this:

    "Mr Tedros also branded the corruption around personal protective gear (PPE) for coronavirus as "murder".

    In strong remarks, he said that corruption which deprives health workers of appropriate PPE threatened not only their lives, but also the lives of their patients suffering from Covid-19.

    The WHO director-general was replying to a question about South Africa, which is reeling from coronavirus-linked corruption scandals that have battered President Cyril Ramaphosa's credibility."


    "The outcry in South Africa began with reports that local government officials were hoarding and selling food donations meant for families without income during lockdown.

    Then anger mounted further when some hospitals found that state purchases of masks, gowns and other PPE were not reaching staff."




  3. #173
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    14,538
    That "corruption" sounds very familiar and is occurring close to home.

    It's been a "Do this for me and I'll provide you with PPE". Yes, that is blood on the hands of the people who are mandating political support in exchange for life-protecting and life-saving supplies and equipment.

    But we're not listening to the WHO anymore.

  4. #174
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    The Ashes of The Past
    Posts
    158
    Gender
    Male
    Fudgie, can I just say thank you for being a healthcare worker. You guys are really underappreciated for all you do. From Dec 2018 to Aug 2019 my father, oldest brother, mother, and best friend all had serious health issues with my father passing away. So I've developed a newfound respect for anyone in the health field. We need more people like you. And at least in the US, we really need a better healthcare system period. It's astonishing that so many have to struggle with something that you would think would be a basic right, the right be healthy and live without digging yourself into debt.

  5.  

  6. #175
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cloud Nine
    Posts
    40,625
    Gender
    Male
    A Hong Kong man who recovered from COVID-19 was infected again four-and-a-half months later in the first documented instance of human re-infection, researchers at the University of Hong Kong said on Monday.

    The findings indicate the disease, which has killed more than 800,000 people worldwide, may continue to spread amongst the global population despite herd immunity, they said.

    The 33-year-old male was cleared of COVID-19 and discharged from a hospital in April, but tested positive again after returning from Spain via Britain on Aug. 15.

    The patient had appeared to be previously healthy, researchers said in the paper, which was accepted by the international medical journal Clinical Infectious Diseases but is not yet available online.

    He was found to have contracted a different coronavirus strain from the one he had previously contracted and remained asymptomatic for the second infection.

    "The finding does not mean taking vaccines will be useless," Dr. Kai-Wang To, one of the leading authors of the paper, told Reuters. "Immunity induced by vaccination can be different from those induced by natural infection," To said. " will need to wait for the results of the vaccine trials to see if how effective vaccines are."

  7. #176
    Platinum Member LaHermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    2,510
    Gender
    Female
    Before everyone starts racing to build underground bunkers:

    "The study has been accepted by medical journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, but the full research is yet to be published.

    But experts in the UK say it is too early to say what the single case may mean on a global scale.

    Professor of microbial pathogenesis, Brendan Wren, of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: “With over three million cases of Covid-19 worldwide, the first reported case of a potential reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 needs to be taken into context.

    “It appears that the young and healthy adult has been reinfected with a slight SARS-CoV-2 variant from the initial infection three months previously.

    “It is to be expected that the virus will naturally mutate over time. This is a very rare example of reinfection and it should not negate the global drive to develop Covid-19 vaccines.”

    Dr Jeffrey Barrett, senior scientific consultant for Covid-19 Genome Project at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said: “This is certainly stronger evidence of reinfection than some of the previous reports because it uses the genome sequence of the virus to separate the two infections.

    “It seems much more likely that this patient has two distinct infections than a single infection followed by a relapse (due to the number of genetic differences between the two sequences).”

    But he added that it is “very hard” to make any strong inference from a single observation, and that seeing one case of reinfection is not that surprising."


    and

    "Maria Van Kerkhove, technical lead for Covid-19 at the World Health Organisation, said she was still studying the Hong Kong reinfection case but urged people to put it into the context of 24m cases reported worldwide."

  8. #177
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Cloud Nine
    Posts
    40,625
    Gender
    Male
    Everybody just wants a solution.🙁

  9. #178
    Platinum Member LaHermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    2,510
    Gender
    Female
    Hey Wise.

    "What we want and what we actually get in this life tend to be two different things".

    Short of aliens land on Earth with a weapon to zap that pesky virus and make it disappear it looks like any solution won't be tomorrow.

    Everyone would like to see a return to a spontaneous way of life, and get the economy up and running again.

    Meantime check out this man:
    Professor Carl Henneghan

    [Register to see the link]

  10. #179
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    14,538
    There isn't going to be any "insta-solution". We are going to have to buckle down and realize we need to keep many of the changes for at least a period of months. Otherwise if we get impatient and stop being careful we can look forward to years of this in addition to losing more loved ones.

    I'd rather wear a mask than wear a venilator. And I'd rather socially distance than inadvertently and unknowingly pass the virus on to someone I care about or to someone who's vulnerable and could die from it.

  11. #180
    Platinum Member LaHermes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Europe
    Posts
    2,510
    Gender
    Female
    From "The Guardian" on 1st September.



    News of the deal came as AstraZeneca announced on Monday night that it had begun late-stage trials of the vaccine in the US, where it plans to enrol 30,000 adults, as part of a global programme to test the product on 50,000 people.

    AstraZeneca, along with US company Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech which are also developing a coronavirus vaccine, have said they could have data by October to secure approval from US regulators for emergency use of their respective products."


    [Register to see the link]

Page 18 of 19 FirstFirst ... 1516171819 LastLast

Videos


Maintaining A Strong Relationship

Detaching From a Malignant Man

Divorced Parents Prefer Technology and Social Media As Communication Tool

Wedding Jitters Could Be a Predictor for a Future Divorce

Botox Fights Depression And Makes You Feel Happier

Men Are More Sensitive than Women when Having Relationship Problems
Give Advice
Ask For Advice

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •