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Thread: Negotiating after I signed Offer Letter

  1. #1
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    Negotiating after I signed Offer Letter

    I was offered this nice permanent position at a stable, long lasting financial company last week. I signed the offer, and right now, theyíre just going through the background check. Iím starting in 1 Ĺ weeks.
    I had very smooth, easy interviews with them. They were very quick in the interview process, the interviews were great, the guy who would be my boss is great. I feel the role would be fun and challenging.

    Even though I already accepted the offer, I went on a few other interviews that were already scheduled, just in case.
    An interview I went on yesterday was a temp to perm position at a start-up, the office has about 14 people in it, I have always liked the idea of start-ups, but never had the chance to work at one.
    They just made me an offer this morning.
    The pay as a temp would be about the same as the job I already accepted the offer for. However, when I go perm, which they claim would be in about a month, the pay would go up $12K.
    They want to know this morning whether or not I accept it. Iím not sure why Iím not given much time to accept the offer.

    I donít know, I already accepted the other offer, and although the pay is lower, I feel I should stick with the original offer. I figured, hopefully I can eventually make a bigger salary eventually with this company.

    Should I try to negotiate with the first company? Is that ok to do that even though I already signed the offer letter? I donít want them to then come back and rescind the offer.

  2. #2
    Platinum Member DancingFool's Avatar
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    It would be incredibly foolish of you to reject a full time job offer at a stable secure company and take up a job with a startup that is ONLY offering you a temp position and simply dangling a carrot of turning this into a permanent position for slightly more pay.

    Look at it logically - if they actually had a full time permanent position and the funds to pay for it, they wouldn't be temping it. I see way too many people get caught up in this game, which is perfectly legal, and get themselves burned badly as the temp job either ends quickly or drags on for another month or two or ten and never quite matures into what was promised. A promise is not a guarantee of anything. The pressure to make a quick decision is another red flag for you. They don't want you to think, just jump in because they need an easily disposable warm body right now, which is all a temp job is - disposable.

    When looking at job offers always focus only on what you are actually getting today and ignore future promises. What you are getting today with the start up is a 30 day temp job and that is all.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    It's certainly not a good look to negotiate after you've signed off on an offer. Not sure how long ago you accepted it, but that's time they could have extended an offer to another candidate who's content with the salary, or they may have lost their backup candidates altogether. Either you essentially assure them you'll still take the position regardless, giving them absolutely zero incentive to increase the offer, or you play hardball and put them in a position they may have to run the whole interviewing process again if they refuse.

    As for the startup, there's a lot I'd consider sketchy, and it'd frankly be a no-brainer to turn it down. For one, it's a start up. But expecting a 24-hour turn around for an alleged long-term opportunity, "claims" of an extra $12k after temp... I'd bet $12k of my own money that you'd be gone after the month or they keep you on as long as they need to while unfortunately not having hit high enough numbers to extend you the raise. If the work is valued at their offer + $12k, that's what you offer. If you don't live up to it, you get ****-canned after your probationary period. Even if they're being legitimate, it's just a scummy business practice.

    If you've got a fair offer at a company you're optimistic about and people you think you'll like (or at least tolerate), I'd consider it a success.

  4. #4
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
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    Startups are exciting but often shut down or severely reduce staff once the initial funding runs out and the company isn't turning a profit.

    As for negotiating after signing an offer, I don't think you'd be successful. Before the offer is signed is the usual time for negotiations, not after. Could it also be considered legally binding?

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    Originally Posted by DaisyMayPorter
    I was offered this nice permanent position at a stable, long lasting financial company last week. I signed the offer, and right now, theyíre just going through the background check. Iím starting in 1 Ĺ weeks.
    I had very smooth, easy interviews with them. They were very quick in the interview process, the interviews were great, the guy who would be my boss is great. I feel the role would be fun and challenging.

    Even though I already accepted the offer, I went on a few other interviews that were already scheduled, just in case.
    An interview I went on yesterday was a temp to perm position at a start-up, the office has about 14 people in it, I have always liked the idea of start-ups, but never had the chance to work at one.
    They just made me an offer this morning.
    The pay as a temp would be about the same as the job I already accepted the offer for. However, when I go perm, which they claim would be in about a month, the pay would go up $12K.
    They want to know this morning whether or not I accept it. Iím not sure why Iím not given much time to accept the offer.

    I donít know, I already accepted the other offer, and although the pay is lower, I feel I should stick with the original offer. I figured, hopefully I can eventually make a bigger salary eventually with this company.

    Should I try to negotiate with the first company? Is that ok to do that even though I already signed the offer letter? I donít want them to then come back and rescind the offer.
    There's your answer, imo. No promise, just an undefinable if and when, which sounds pretty unstable to me. I'd go with the more solid offer, which is the first one in which it sounds like you would also very well most likely have some upward mobility in a solid company.

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    Originally Posted by DancingFool
    It would be incredibly foolish of you to reject a full time job offer at a stable secure company and take up a job with a startup that is ONLY offering you a temp position and simply dangling a carrot of turning this into a permanent position for slightly more pay.

    Look at it logically - if they actually had a full time permanent position and the funds to pay for it, they wouldn't be temping it. I see way too many people get caught up in this game, which is perfectly legal, and get themselves burned badly as the temp job either ends quickly or drags on for another month or two or ten and never quite matures into what was promised. A promise is not a guarantee of anything. The pressure to make a quick decision is another red flag for you. They don't want you to think, just jump in because they need an easily disposable warm body right now, which is all a temp job is - disposable.

    When looking at job offers always focus only on what you are actually getting today and ignore future promises. What you are getting today with the start up is a 30 day temp job and that is all.
    You are right! Thank you Dancing Fool! That's why I'm so hesitant about taking it. I did have a contract job at a job before and they were "supposed" to go permanent within a few months and it took them wayyyy longer to go permanent than I expected. I don't want to get burned again.

    My recruiter, who I've been working with only on this temp-to-perm job (I found the permanent job myself) emailed me and said I'm their first choice, but they need to know by 12:00 noon (that's in an hour at this point) or they give the job to the next candidate. Way to make someone feel special! So I emailed her back saying that I will be unable to give them an answer by 12:00, so I will have to pass. She just responded with, "do you have time for a quick chat?" and I have not responded. I don't like being forced into taking a position so quickly. Plus, with the permanent position, there was no "It's between you and another candidate"... they knew they wanted me, and moved quickly, which was so nice for a change. They didn't even mention another candidate. Money isn't everything...(is it? lol) Plus, at the stable permanent job, I'm making a lot more than I'm making at my current job, so that's good enough for me for now.

    I did leave a voice message with the permanent job's HR person who sent me the offer letter, telling them I had a question, but I didn't mention what the question was. Should I even bother to negotiate with them at this point?

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    Originally Posted by j.man
    It's certainly not a good look to negotiate after you've signed off on an offer. Not sure how long ago you accepted it, but that's time they could have extended an offer to another candidate who's content with the salary, or they may have lost their backup candidates altogether. Either you essentially assure them you'll still take the position regardless, giving them absolutely zero incentive to increase the offer, or you play hardball and put them in a position they may have to run the whole interviewing process again if they refuse.

    As for the startup, there's a lot I'd consider sketchy, and it'd frankly be a no-brainer to turn it down. For one, it's a start up. But expecting a 24-hour turn around for an alleged long-term opportunity, "claims" of an extra $12k after temp... I'd bet $12k of my own money that you'd be gone after the month or they keep you on as long as they need to while unfortunately not having hit high enough numbers to extend you the raise. If the work is valued at their offer + $12k, that's what you offer. If you don't live up to it, you get ****-canned after your probationary period. Even if they're being legitimate, it's just a scummy business practice.

    If you've got a fair offer at a company you're optimistic about and people you think you'll like (or at least tolerate), I'd consider it a success.
    Thank you- I agree! And I won't negotiate -- I feel like the financial company gave me a great offer and I don't want to burn any bridges or make things worse.
    I'm actually glad that this happened with the Temp position - meaning, glad that they gave me a time limit to decide, because it makes me completely not want the offer after all.

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    Originally Posted by jul-els
    There's your answer, imo. No promise, just an undefinable if and when, which sounds pretty unstable to me. I'd go with the more solid offer, which is the first one in which it sounds like you would also very well most likely have some upward mobility in a solid company.
    Thank you for the advice - I agree! :-) And I really like the big company, they seem great.

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    Plus I was just thinking, if the start up can so quickly "give it to another candidate" after 12:00 pm, what else can they change their minds about???

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    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    Startups are exciting but often shut down or severely reduce staff once the initial funding runs out and the company isn't turning a profit.

    As for negotiating after signing an offer, I don't think you'd be successful. Before the offer is signed is the usual time for negotiations, not after. Could it also be considered legally binding?
    You could be right about the negotiating, I don't want to cause any harm. And this start up is really a start up -- they only opened 1 year ago. And I'm not independently wealthy, so if they go down, I won't have the funds to back it up.

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