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Thread: Can't stop overeating

  1. #1
    Bronze Member Brutal555's Avatar
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    Can't stop overeating

    Hi guys.
    I'm a 23 year old guy and I have a problem with eating too much daily without much physical activity and I need your help.
    My problem may sound silly, but ever since I was a kid I was overweight and I always used food as a source of comfort. I am very prone to being highly obese.
    Later on I lost significant amout of weight and kept the good figure, but for the last 2 years I just eat way too much than I need to and I also don't have much physical activity at all. My work requires me to sit for 7 hours, I drive everywhere using my car, and at home I also sit. When I'm out - I'm out in some cafe where I also sit and drink coffee or something.
    I know the obvious thing - change something. But It's just not that easy to change unhealthy habit just like that. I think I have a serious eating disorder or something and any words of help and ad
    vice are more than welcome for me.
    I am 193cm tall (6'4)
    And I probably weight about 110kg (17 stone)

  2. #2
    Platinum Member Cherylyn's Avatar
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    You're young and now is the time to change for yourself because no one cares more than you for your body, your mental and physical state.

    It's hard to have self control in the beginning but once you start eating healthier, your previous consumption will repulse you. You will start to actually crave healthy food. At first, you'll feel tempted to cheat but after practicing self control and new habits, you'll feel physically feel better, lighter, your clothes will feel looser, your digestion improves and your temptation to eat poorly will dissipate because you'll equate gorging on unhealthy food with feeling heavy, ill, gross and lousy.

    Since you sit at your desk for 7 hours, break it up with getting up and stretching your legs every now and then. Instead of eating, walk during your lunch hour to break up your day with exercise. Bring healthy snacks to work. Drink more water.

    When you grocery shop, deliberately refrain from buying junk food and processed food. Buy vegetables, fruit, lean proteins and eat a SMALL serving of oatmeal for breakfast. Don't eat out often. Cook healthy food at home. It's healthier and economical. Cook extra food for leftover dinners and so you can take food from home to work. If you eat out, make wise menu choices.

    Take safe evening walks and walk on weekends. If you have a friend who owns a dog, offer to take the dog for a walk.

    You're smart for taking action now as opposed to setting yourself up for hypertension, diabetes and heart disease. Also, eating poorly and lack of exercise causes pain and inflammation in your body and joints. It's not too late to take action for getting healthy. Better now than when you're 33, 43 or 53. Make serious lifestyle changes to save your life.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Ok, that's not that overweight. Being sedentary is seems is the issue. So rather than dieting (bad idea since it decreases rather than raises your metabolic rate) try everyday increases in physical activity. Stairs, walking, etc. things you can slowly but surely incorporate into your everyday life. Forget "diet" food. Just cut out the junk.
    Originally Posted by Brutal555
    I am 193cm tall (6'4) And I probably weight about 110kg (17 stone)

  4. #4
    Platinum Member Lambert's Avatar
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    This is not uncommon at all. But the fact that you see the problem is good. Its not easy to change, but you need to and it sounds like you need help.

    Ask your doctor for a referral to an eating disorder specialist. You have address the readons fir emotional eating and get some strategies to conquer this behavior.

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  6. #5
    Platinum Member Cherylyn's Avatar
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    See a nutritionist to get you back on the right track.

  7. #6
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    There is no excuse for not incorporating exercise into your life. Start walking at lunch time and after dinner. Join a gym. Just do something to get yourself moving. Instead of sitting around in your free time, do a physical activity. Do things with friends. Join a a walking Meetup.

    See a nutritionist and a therapist to get to the underlying problem of your eating.

    Stop saying "can't" as this is a big part of the problem.

  8. #7
    Bronze Member Brutal555's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for spending your time to reply me. Your advice means the world to me. Also, yeah, I'm still young to fix this. Longterm I see myself having a heart attack If I continue this way. You encouraged me to go see a nutritionist. Starting tomorrow, I will remember every word you said first thing in the morning. And make a much better breakfast decision, for a start. And take a walk after work.

  9. #8
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
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    Ask yourself if eating that food is more important to you than being healthy and fit.

    Also, I feel people need to accept that they won't be that perfect physique they see on TV or in the movies. Healthy can mean many different things.

  10. #9
    Platinum Member reinventmyself's Avatar
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    You admit that you are overeating as a source of comfort. To tell someone just to stop and eat more celery doesn't work.

    Your overeating is a symptom of something bigger. You need to address the cause.
    You are medicating yourself much like an alcoholic uses alcohol. Telling them to just stop drinking doesn't address the problem.

    This is why people who have gastric bypasses have a low success rate. It's an attempt to eliminate a symptoms without addressing what it is that causes someone to do it in the first place.

    There is a high incidence of cirrhosis of the liver in people who have had bypasses. They trade in one vice for another and without the gastric juices and depending on which surgery they've had, the alcohol doesn't breakdown as much and goes straight to liver. I had a high school friend who died due to this. She stopped over eating but still went about numbing her pain in a different way.

    Have you considered therapy to address why you need food for comfort?

  11. #10
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    I am not sure of the program name but it's something like Food Addicts Anonymous? Supposed to be very good. Also I highly recommend Weight Watchers. Of course it's not easy - so take baby steps. I'm 53 and I do intense cardio every single day. Been exercising regularly since 1982. If I can anyone can. Diet is also part of it of course but moving more will motivate you to eat healthier. Good luck!

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