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Thread: Childhood trauma/abuse and young-middle adulthood memory loss. A connection?

  1. #11
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    I can remember the abuse as a child but since my DPDR/PTSD causing accident as an adult i have a really bad memory.

  2. #12
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    I have a really good memory for details from the past, the good, the bad, the ugly. But your question comes across as seeking expert/professional advice - I am neither so for example if I had a bad memory as you described I wouldn't feel comfortable linking it to a bad childhood experience. Also I bet accessibility to photos/videos/past accounts of childhood affect memory - like my son who is 10 has a decent memory of his early childhood but some of that might be because of the photos we have in the house (no, no traumatic "abuse" situations in the least and yes there were some painful/scary experiences cause, well "life"). I wonder about whether the people who post floods of photos and videos of their kids all over social media and their phone ( we do not and allow only limited photos of our child on social media on certain sites related to his school/extracurricular activities) will or have affected their kids' memories, good and bad.

  3. #13
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I have a really good memory for details from the past, the good, the bad, the ugly. But your question comes across as seeking expert/professional advice - I am neither so for example if I had a bad memory as you described I wouldn't feel comfortable linking it to a bad childhood experience. Also I bet accessibility to photos/videos/past accounts of childhood affect memory - like my son who is 10 has a decent memory of his early childhood but some of that might be because of the photos we have in the house (no, no traumatic "abuse" situations in the least and yes there were some painful/scary experiences cause, well "life"). I wonder about whether the people who post floods of photos and videos of their kids all over social media and their phone ( we do not and allow only limited photos of our child on social media on certain sites related to his school/extracurricular activities) will or have affected their kids' memories, good and bad.
    Absolutely 100% PTSD affects memory. PTSD is an actual physical brain injury. Child abuse causes the brain not to grow properly. It can also physically and chemically alter the adult brain.

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    Originally Posted by ~Seraphim ~
    Absolutely 100% PTSD affects memory. PTSD is an actual physical brain injury. Child abuse causes the brain not to grow properly. It can also physically and chemically alter the adult brain.
    Child abuse is horrible. I don't agree about all child abuse causing all children's brains not to grow properly. Especially if itís one incident where the child is letís say hit in an abusive way. Which of course is horrible but I doubt all such incidents have that result. From my knowledge, it sounds like that is a possibility based on certain studies, not a fact in all cases. Having written that I am not an expert and if you are a scientist or medical professional in this specific area you have more knowledge than me of course. Not at all interested in debating and the OP didn't ask if child abuse causes the brain not to grow properly - it was a very specific question about memory which may or may not be related to the proper growth of the brain. Lots of conditions can affect memory.
    Last edited by Batya33; 01-25-2020 at 03:20 PM.

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  6. #15
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    I believe Seraphim is right in the way that Trauma as a child causes the brain to not form the same way as 99% of the population.

    Research has shown that certain areas of the brain are different physically from people with PTSD than those without. This difference is prevalent in the majority of cases.

  7. #16
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    Originally Posted by ninjabib
    I believe Seraphim is right in the way that Trauma as a child causes the brain to not form the same way as 99% of the population.

    Research has shown that certain areas of the brain are different physically from people with PTSD than those without. This difference is prevalent in the majority of cases.
    Yes - I can certainly believe that certain trauma to certain children can cause the brain not to form the same way. I don't agree with how broadly she put it - that doesn't seem to be accurate but again if she is an expert in this specific area I defer. It's not what I know from my knowledge on the subject.

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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    Yes - I can certainly believe that certain trauma to certain children can cause the brain not to form the same way. I don't agree with how broadly she put it - that doesn't seem to be accurate but again if she is an expert in this specific area I defer. It's not what I know from my knowledge on the subject.
    On PTSD which of course can happen to people of all ages I don't have any knowledge -was referring to the child abuse comment.

    Separately, I personally am a little uncomfortable with this thread - I tend to agree with Wiseman -it seems to be a general research question and not about a specific situation and because of that it's going into these unrelated and sensitive areas -highly sensitive for certain people. OP is there some specific reason you are asking this really broad question? Child abuse and PTSD are hot button issues. On the other hand many adults have memory related issues for various reasons - sometimes mild/annoying, sometimes severe, sometimes situational like the blocking out Cherlyn recommended. Many many reasons. I am particularly sensitive to memory issues because I'm 53, perimenopausal (which I understand can lead to foggy brain at times), multitask far too much and have a child who is great at distracting me and then I'm not sure if I forgot things because of distraction or some other reason. But no it's not to my knowledge related to PTSD or abuse because to my knowledge none of those ever occurred to me -and of course I'm very fortunate.

    I also know of people who probably have undiagnosed PTSD or suffered trauma and actually have no memory of it nor the resources to delve into their pasts (or maybe the motivations).

    So again your question is hypothetically interesting to you and perhaps others but..... why do you ask?

  9. #18
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    Not everyone is going to develop PTSD of course. Only a certain percentage of the population. It is circumstances and genetic vulnerability.

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    I'm not an expert by any means. I've just done a lot of reading and researching PTSD on my own.
    It's still relatively new to be studied and there is so much still not known. They have found correlations with trauma and memory loss. There have been correlations found as well to a disruption in spatial processing. Also, to disruption with emotional regulation, concentration issues and in some cases, changes to the prefrontal cortex.
    It's more complex than that though as PTSD impacts a person as a whole, and very often is untreated. There then can be a whole new host of medical and physiological issues from living with chronic PTSD. Severe sleep disruption, hyper arousal and terror are common - this all impacts things like being able to recall as well!

    Take all that, then add in childhood abuse, which can have wide and varied impacts, it's so complicated. There may have been neglect of important formative needs like nutrition. There may be medical damage from neglect. There may be medical damage from abuse. On and on, and that doesn't even touch on the psychological aspects.

  11. #20
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    Originally Posted by itsallgrand
    I'm not an expert by any means. I've just done a lot of reading and researching PTSD on my own.
    It's still relatively new to be studied and there is so much still not known. They have found correlations with trauma and memory loss. There have been correlations found as well to a disruption in spatial processing. Also, to disruption with emotional regulation, concentration issues and in some cases, changes to the prefrontal cortex.
    It's more complex than that though as PTSD impacts a person as a whole, and very often is untreated. There then can be a whole new host of medical and physiological issues from living with chronic PTSD. Severe sleep disruption, hyper arousal and terror are common - this all impacts things like being able to recall as well!

    Take all that, then add in childhood abuse, which can have wide and varied impacts, it's so complicated. There may have been neglect of important formative needs like nutrition. There may be medical damage from neglect. There may be medical damage from abuse. On and on, and that doesn't even touch on the psychological aspects.
    Thank you, yes. Also not an expert but I do suffer from complex multi decade PTSD. I have suffered severe neglect and abuses. It DEFINITELY affects my memory, how I process and my physical health.

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