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Thread: Money and issues with grandma

  1. #21
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    Originally Posted by SherrySher
    Yes, get some classes and credentials, because if you truly do want to be taken seriously and hopefully make some kind of career out of it, you will need credentials.

    Everyone has experience, and everyone has an opinion, it doesn't mean people will pay to hear it.

    Blogs are one thing...it's free to read, but add in money to the mix and people will want someone who has been formally educated.
    I can understand that. Thank you.

  2. #22
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
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    I don't know where you're at, but hopefully your debt doesn't add up to more than 30% of your income. And only making the minimum payments does nothing but pay the interest. Anything more than the minimum you can pay will help get those debts paid off quicker and you save on interest.

    Getting rid of unnecessary extras is a great idea. And you can eat in for way less money than eating out so that's also a good plan.

    Try to save as much as possible each month even if it's just a few dollars.

  3. #23
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    Originally Posted by JDAnthony
    I have enrolled in some through Coursera, although I don't yet have any formal degrees or certifications, but I'm looking into that.

    Most of my writing is based on experience, observation, and pulling from studies/statistical data.

    There are ways to position yourself as an authority in your field and build clientele without having a fancy University degree, (one called the "Know, Like, and Trust factor") but I intent on furthering my knowledge and education through whatever means I have.
    its amazing how many "financial advisors" and "life coaches" can barely hold their own together.
    The "know, trust" comes on TOP of professional credentials.

    Well, "know, like, trust" do not help you if someone sues you if you are putting up your shingle as a "counselor" or "relationship advisor". You can learn deeply through research and become an expert in a certain area of history, or If you are writing articles about trends based on statistics, fine, but I have seen some very bad things happen when under qualified people take on "clients". people with severe issues sometimes seek out these kinds of "advisors" if they don't really want to deal with the issue, but want a pat on the back.

    You can get a 2 year degree in social work, and that might be beneficial to you as a start.

  4. #24
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    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    its amazing how many "financial advisors" and "life coaches" can barely hold their own together.
    The "know, trust" comes on TOP of professional credentials.

    Well, "know, like, trust" do not help you if someone sues you if you are putting up your shingle as a "counselor" or "relationship advisor". You can learn deeply through research and become an expert in a certain area of history, or If you are writing articles about trends based on statistics, fine, but I have seen some very bad things happen when under qualified people take on "clients". people with severe issues sometimes seek out these kinds of "advisors" if they don't really want to deal with the issue, but want a pat on the back.

    You can get a 2 year degree in social work, and that might be beneficial to you as a start.
    I could not agree more with this. And it's not a "fancy university degree" -it's a degree from an accredited source that tells people you did formal study of the subject matter and got the necessary licenses and certifications on top of that - please don't dismiss it as something elitist or just a piece of paper. I agree that no one will pay you $ for advice they can also get for free from a friend, a book, an article, various blogs/internet sources. But if you are a professional and licensed and have client reviews based on your services then you can start to build a clientele and business. Yes there are rare exceptions but given your financial situation I don't think right now is the time to bank on remote possibilities.

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  6. #25
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    You and your husbands approach to life sounds a bit in the moment and chaotic. You can't keep relying on family when you have preventable 'emergencies". Stop living hand to mouth and running to family to bail you out. No one should be financing your education at this point. Both you and your husband need real full-time paying jobs. Blogging is not a job no matter when you get up to do it. Do not spend even more money on tuition you can't afford.

  7. #26
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    Here's what I have been doing so far.

    In 2014 I spent about a year on a website called Elancer which is now Upwork where I bid on projects and wrote about a variety of different topics. This wasn't the only thing I was doing, still had my retail job. Was making about 100 a week writing for Elance that but stopped when I realized I wanted to focus more on writing about dating and relationships.

    Then my mom died and I went on a hiatus from writing for about 6 months.

    Then in 2015 I created a blog style website of articles I've written giving dating and relationship advice.

    Written about a hundred separate articles for content mills such as Thought Catalog, Elite Daily, Bustle, Bolde, Huffington Post. Some of which I have gotten paid for as a freelancer contributor.

    I scaled back on my writing in 2017 to pursue a job as a fire and led performance artist (a skilled hobby I have been on for several years) with a group that wanted to hire me when we moved to SC. It's fun and makes good extra money but I don't have the energy or will to travel constantly like some of the other people in this group, so now I'm an alternate and take on a few local gigs here and there.

    I am very present on several social media platforms and online communities where people inbox me advice for their specific situation, which I give them advice for free.

    Built and email list to my more dedicated followers where I send out newsletter type of emails and more exclusive content.

    I've been doing all of this in my free time and have always also had my job in retail working between 20-35 hours a week (since 2009)

    What I want for the future: Build a larger following doing what I'm doing only more consistently. Write and sell ebooks, hard copy books. Service courses and one on one sessions through my website. Start a podcast/videocast.

    So what degrees or certifications would be best for this? Social work and psychology? Marriage and family therapy?

    Also doing this would put me back into debt and not the small kind I'm in right now, but like tens of thousands... until I can pay it off later. Is that a good idea?

    I get discouraged about school because I know too many people with college degrees still working as Walmart Greeters and Gary Vaynerchuck barely finished high school and he's a millionaire.
    Last edited by JDAnthony; 12-29-2019 at 11:29 AM.

  8. #27
    Platinum Member boltnrun's Avatar
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    Does your plan include full time work while you pursue your blogging career? Does your husband also intend to obtain full time employment?

  9. #28
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    What you wrote sounds great for someone who has disposable income, a nest egg and savings and,if married, a husband who can be the main provider. Certainly people get rich without a college degree. In my experience and from my knowledge it's much harder to be employable without a degree. What you have pursued sounds like something to keep pursuing on the side while maintaining a full time job hopefully with benefits if your husband doesn't have benefits that cover you. Then when you've amassed a nest egg you can start to transition it to more like a full time gig.

  10. #29
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    My brother is a financial advisor . He has had to take many many courses ,exams, accreditations etc etc and has over 25 years experience. He is extremely financially solid both in liquid and saved assets. He is in the top 1% in income bracket in Canada. He is the top producer for his financial institution . He was also a comptroller.

    When looking for financial advice thatís where people should look. People who have the qualifications and experience.

  11. #30
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    Originally Posted by JDAnthony
    Here's what I have been doing so far.

    In 2014 I spent about a year on a website called Elancer which is now Upwork where I bid on projects and wrote about a variety of different topics. This wasn't the only thing I was doing, still had my retail job. Was making about 100 a week writing for Elance that but stopped when I realized I wanted to focus more on writing about dating and relationships.

    Then my mom died and I went on a hiatus from writing for about 6 months.

    Then in 2015 I created a blog style website of articles I've written giving dating and relationship advice.

    Written about a hundred separate articles for content mills such as Thought Catalog, Elite Daily, Bustle, Bolde, Huffington Post. Some of which I have gotten paid for as a freelancer contributor.

    I scaled back on my writing in 2017 to pursue a job as a fire and led performance artist (a skilled hobby I have been on for several years) with a group that wanted to hire me when we moved to SC. It's fun and makes good extra money but I don't have the energy or will to travel constantly like some of the other people in this group, so now I'm an alternate and take on a few local gigs here and there.

    I am very present on several social media platforms and online communities where people inbox me advice for their specific situation, which I give them advice for free.

    Built and email list to my more dedicated followers where I send out newsletter type of emails and more exclusive content.

    I've been doing all of this in my free time and have always also had my job in retail working between 20-35 hours a week (since 2009)

    What I want for the future: Build a larger following doing what I'm doing only more consistently. Write and sell ebooks, hard copy books. Service courses and one on one sessions through my website. Start a podcast/videocast.

    So what degrees or certifications would be best for this? Social work and psychology? Marriage and family therapy?

    Also doing this would put me back into debt and not the small kind I'm in right now, but like tens of thousands... until I can pay it off later. Is that a good idea?

    I get discouraged about school because I know too many people with college degrees still working as Walmart Greeters and Gary Vaynerchuck barely finished high school and he's a millionaire.
    people who become biollionaires with a GED are the anomaly and not the norm. And you see things in black and white. Trust me, most of those walmart greeters are developmetally disabed, retired, or otherwise not looking to move up. Someone who is a go getter will be working stock on the night shift so they can go to all of their acting auditions, go to trade school, or while they are interviewing in their field during the day. They are not the greeter. Since you think you are qualified to give other people advice, what would you give someone such as yourself?

    There are people who get college degrees hoping they will figure out what they want to do. If you are going to trade school or getting a degree in something in high demand - ie, special education teacher, medical technicians, pipe fitter, then there is no way you will be unemployed unless you are terrible at it.

    You seriously lack boundaries if anyone can inbox you for advice for free. You are wasting your time and energy by focusing on things that don't generate income. Writing articles generated money for you, but they don't qualify you to advise people on mental health. So focus on your website getting you speaking gigs (motivational, not "counseling"if you are good at it) or more writing = things that might bring money, but do not advise people psychologically), but spend the other hours getting a W2 and taking classes instead of free advice.

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