Facebook share
LinkedIn share
Google plus share
Twitter plus share
Give Advice
Ask For Advice
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: Former employer wants me back

  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    372

    Former employer wants me back

    Hi all,

    This is going to be a slightly long post, so my apologies for the length.

    Back in April, I left my former employer of 3 years (investment bank) to move into a new role in a major accounting firm.

    During my time at my former employer, I worked under a dual management. I was directly reporting to some middle-management in my location, but most of my work was assigned and reviewed by senior management abroad. I absolutely loved working with the management abroad and they often requested me to travel to their office which no one in my location did. Unfortunately, my direct management was downright toxic. The salary was low combined with the lack of prospects and toxicity, people were dropping like flies. When I left, a lot of markets had no coverage because the staff was gone. Everyone with 1+ year experience in the team had left. I was one of the very few that remained and after I left, I heard the local team over here had to be rebuilt almost from scratch because everyone except the management was gone.

    I was a top performer and had a great track record of successful transactions above standards etc..

    Anyway, the company was performing rather poorly and couldn't afford to provide counter-offers. Instead, one of the senior people I worked with abroad referred me to an open position back in April. I was ambushed into an interview and the department in question disappeared into thin air after emailing me to request a second interview. They never set-up that second interview and didn't have the courtesy to advise me of my rejection.

    Fast forward, a new opening comes to surface and I get a call from one of the senior managers abroad asking me whether I would be interested. Apparently, a few directors advise I would be the preferred choice. However, knowing how the company operates, some information is still pending:

    1. Is this an entry-level role? The company has a history of hiring entry-level people for this type of role because it is obviously cheaper. Given I have 5 years experience and a solid educational background with 3 languages, I would not let myself slide back into an entry level role. The senior person I spoke to said she's going to investigate as she's not sure of the title.

    2. The job is located abroad, which would mean uprooting my entire life to move there (already lived there for a little while a few years back), which I'm not too sure of.

    3. Career progression is also rather questionable as the company has frozen promotions due to poor performance. Even though it may not impact me right away, the future prospects seem rather limited. People can stay in the same spot for years.

    4. As I already got referred to another job internally in the same location (mentioned above) which was an utter failure as the communication/transparency was clearly missing, I'm wary of attempting this a second time around with another department in the same location. I'm safely assuming the HR person who handled my application to the other role, will also handle this one.

    On the flip side, my current role:

    1. It's a great company, but the role itself seems to be a dead end. I was offered one job, performed another (great) one for 6 months and now its turned more into a call-center role. It went from financial analysis to call-center (don't ask) due to some internal structure changes. You can imagine how disheartened I am.

    2. The company is doing great and there are a lot of opportunities internally & abroad. Even if my current role does not offer great prospects, my background my allow me to move. There's a lot of material for personal and professional growth as they have a large network, seminars, great social life etc..

    3. The company is very large and you're dealing with a lot of people. My former employer was also a large corporation, but the proposed location for new prospective job has very few people in the team. I'd be going from floors with around 100 people, to a floor of 20 people. Given I'm in my twenties & dynamic, I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable in a floot with 20 people who are all twice my age. Having worked from there a few times, there is no one in my age range. I'm afraid of getting bored going from a factory to a small house.

    I still adore my former employer, but I'm not sure if going back is the best move for my personal growth even though my current role is less than ideal.

    Obviously, we're still in the initial stages and just discussing, but any insight/help would be appreciated.

    Thank you,

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    68
    damn, well I'm in the medical/health care field so I don't know too much about your sector, so not sure how much I can help you...

    all I can say is don't ever let a company place less value on you when you know you can bring more to the table. you seem like a young bright guy and don't seem too enthused with either option. in the meantime, I would just stay at your company while keeping your eyes peeled at better opportunities. in the meantime, keep your resume up to date and increase your skill set so when the best opportunity arrives, you can pounce on it and have an even better job and position. good luck.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    50,781
    Maybe this isn't helpful but this seems to be a really tough decision. Over the years have you become acquainted with any headhunter/career coach type people who would be willing to speak with you and talk this out with you -or a mentor? Or someone at one of your former schools who works in career services? I feel like you might do well to speak with an industry person who is more seasoned than you and has shown an interest in your career in the past. Good luck!!! (It's not the worst problem to have).

  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    372
    Thank you, both.

    My mentor is the one who called me in relation to this job. She's one of the senior people I worked closely with, but she was definitely a mentor.

    Thus, I would need advice from an external party, but I need to think of someone because no one really comes to mind. Perhaps, I'm just tired. It would indeed be great to speak to an industry expert who might have seen this scenario in the past.

  5.  

  6. #5
    Platinum Member maew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,727
    You may have loved your previous company, however you also describe them as a toxic workplace, that they are currently performing poorly and have a high rate of attrition.... and while I can understand why you may be drawn to return to a place where you could shine as a high performer, strategically I am not sure how much sense it makes to take a position with a company knowing it has all of those issues; eventually they will drain you of your energy the same way they did previously.

    Not to mention that a company that can't get it's $hit together is not long for this world... consumers have little patience for organizations that don't change with the times... we have seen many companies close their doors for these and other reasons.

    In my experience, here are the things that tend to build the highest level of engagement and motivation in people:

    Great office culture
    Good people to work with
    Opportunities for growth and personal development
    Supportive management
    A thriving and growing organization

    From what you describe you have all of these and more... and while you might not love your current role, you can choose to empower yourself by developing in the areas you do want to go. Work on building your network, find opportunities for people to get to know you and what you do, find out what it will take for you to get where you want to be, and start taking the steps to get there.

  7. #6
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    2,835
    Gender
    Female
    Originally Posted by RuedeRivoli
    ...Even if my current role does not offer great prospects, my background my allow me to move. There's a lot of material for personal and professional growth as they have a large network, seminars...
    This is all you really need. Don't overthink it. Decide what you enjoy doing, go back to school, streamline your profession and get very good at it. Get the work experience and your designation, mingle around others in the same industry but stop looking over your shoulder and checking to see how you're not measuring up because of unrealistic expectations (grass is greener syndrome). Don't worry so much about your employer right now (you're new). Worry about you and at the most, worry that you are getting the correct work experience related to your designation. Get the right designation and certifications for where you want to grow. Go from there.

  8. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    372
    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    This is all you really need. Don't overthink it. Decide what you enjoy doing, go back to school, streamline your profession and get very good at it. Get the work experience and your designation, mingle around others in the same industry but stop looking over your shoulder and checking to see how you're not measuring up because of unrealistic expectations (grass is greener syndrome). Don't worry so much about your employer right now (you're new). Worry about you and at the most, worry that you are getting the correct work experience related to your designation. Get the right designation and certifications for where you want to grow. Go from there.
    From an educational background, I have nothing to envy to the people who hold positions in the department I wish to move into. As a matter of fact, I have a similar background to theirs as most of them are law educated, engineers, IT etc..As a matter of fact, some of them worked in the same company I did before or studied in the same college. I checked the profile of some colleagues (at my level), working in the department I want to move to and I don't see much of a difference between my path and theirs.

    I have two Bachelor degrees and a Masters degree in Law which are both extremely well recognized in the country & abroad as one of them was earned abroad. Those were actually part of a selective degree.

    In addition, I have several law/business related certifications via additional courses abroad etc. I'm not mentionning this to brag, but just to say that I already have the relevant professional and educational background/necessary skill-set to move into the role I want to move into (consultancy for financial institutions/banks). It just so happens I was recruited for the role I am currently in, but I could have easily applied for a consultancy role if I had thought of it. My mistake when I went through the recruitment process was that I didn't study the opportunities in the company more thoroughly or I would have seen that my profile is a fit for other roles. I simply went along with the role presented by the recruiter because I wanted to get out of my former role due to the increasing negativity. It's just a case of me not taking the time to do proper research, as opposed to me not having the right credentials.

    I should have looked at the other opportunities before joining blindly and moving into a role where I'm slowly but surely all of my hard acquired skills & knowledge.

  9. #8
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    24,318
    Gender
    Female
    I worked for a company that had locations abroad that ONLY hired people in at entry level. you had to stay at that level for at least a year, and then based on what they saw in you, experience, training, you were offered/had the ability to move around and up. It created an ennvironment where everyone was professional, was able to relate to the entry level people because they had been there before, and gave people who maybe didn't have the chance to go to the most esteemed college or had different life experience to shine as well. If the company was like mine - everyone came in at the bottom, but once you had your year or two in, you could go wherever - then its a good idea.

    In otherwords, stay put for awhile.

  10. #9
    Platinum Member maew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    1,727
    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    I worked for a company that had locations abroad that ONLY hired people in at entry level. you had to stay at that level for at least a year, and then based on what they saw in you, experience, training, you were offered/had the ability to move around and up. It created an ennvironment where everyone was professional, was able to relate to the entry level people because they had been there before, and gave people who maybe didn't have the chance to go to the most esteemed college or had different life experience to shine as well. If the company was like mine - everyone came in at the bottom, but once you had your year or two in, you could go wherever - then its a good idea.

    In otherwords, stay put for awhile.
    To be honest I think itís becoming more and more rare that corporations are hiring for anything but entry level positions... for the reasons above, and because why should they when there is such a competitive job market? Itís like doing an extended interview where they get to see how you work, what kind of person you are and thus assess your potential.

    OP you seem a bit impulsive... going where the wind takes you instead of making strategic decisions... what are your future career goals?

  11. #10
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    2,835
    Gender
    Female
    I suspect you'll need a lot more experience than five years for a consultancy position in a financial institution. I wouldn't go back to the previous position as it's unreliable.

    I do agree with you that you're wasting your time in a call center type role. Try mixing around more with other industry professionals. Keep an open mind.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Give Advice
Ask For Advice

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •