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Thread: Struggling with new puppy

  1. #31
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    Has your son's fear of dogs changed at all since getting the puppy?

  2. #32
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    Originally Posted by charity
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    That's honestly so hard to read. I always respect your advice so I'm not dismissing it. I absolutely hear you. But I have to give it some more time and effort before I do that because that would be a very very sad thing for me to do.
    I disagree. You need to contact the breeder to let them know your struggles. Do not dump an untrained dog back on the breeder when they are a teenage puppy of 6-10 months old. Get her in a puppy kindergarten class. But really, if you alert them and they are actually a good breeder, maybe that have a better home lined up. Sometimes an older dog who is kid experienced is a better match -- all this does is punish the dog. But maybe the breeder is at fault, too, because they let someone who is totally inexperience buy a puppy The dog pound is full of 6 months to 1 1/2 year old dogs people 'gave up on" or "couldn't handle" when they refused to go to multiple training classes or were shocked that puppies didn't come potty trained and they bite things

  3. #33
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    Or take your puppy to puppy kindergarten. Then the more advanced puppy class, then basic obedience, and then advanced. The classes train YOU just as much as the puppy. This way you are not teaching your child that pets are disposable and you get rid of them just like that. But only keep if you are willing to commit and set a good example for your child. Your child is watching you. If you step up to the plate, you will have a great furry family member and a companion.Getting a dog was a stupid idea, but now that you are committed -- commit. Jump in with two feet, or talk to the breeder before the puppy is too old.

  4. #34
    Platinum Member charity's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    Has your son's fear of dogs changed at all since getting the puppy?
    His fear of dogs ....it's not a huge problem. I probably should have explained it more. It's more a nervousness and wariness that he has. He's handling the puppy's biting way better then I expected. He doesn't shower her with attention so the puppy doesn't really get the chance to hurt him. He finds her cute and seems ..I guess interested and amused by her?

    My daughter adores her. She wanted a dog since she was 6 and she's now 11 so you can imagine her delight. Hence she gets the brunt of the puppy bites. I've now become a lot more serious about making sure she gives puppy space and isn't lifting her every time she feel like it.

    As for me, I am figuring out that the pup and I are both learning as we go. I've become very consistent with redirecting her to chew toys when she starts the biting. It doesn't always work but it is working a lot of the time. I realized that she means no harm, its not aggression its just really rough play. And I've learned that being too firm with her makes her worse. And like children, it'll take a while before all the positive reinforcement will kick in. We have her 3 weeks tomorrow and there's definitely been progress and learning for both of us in those three weeks.

    For the poster who asked was I too sensitive (I can't remember who said it). You were right. I was. I thought she'd take direction immediately. I thought she'd know a firm voice. I knew puppy's bit. I did not know how hard and how much. I had done the research before I got her but living it was different. But she is just a normal puppy albeit a bitey one!

    So we are keeping her. We love her even though its only been three weeks. And her behaviour this week has shown me that she is capable of learning what she is allowed and not allowed to do.

    Thanks everyone for you're advice.

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  6. #35
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    Your puppy sounds very normal. Everything in the mouth, toys, shoes, fingers, hands . . anything they can get too. It's probably not helping your son with his uneasyness.

    `The best kinda dog is a 2 year old dog', someone told me once when I was walking our 90 lb one year old lab around the block. Or better said, he was walking me.
    I'd love to have a dog, but I respect the time and attention commitment and I just don't have it right now.

    The first few months are really rough.

    I agree with the others, training and exercise. Wear her out!
    I'll bet you'll be back shortly, happy to report you all got past the difficult phase and are enjoying your new furry family member.

    Good Luck

  7. #36
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    For the poster who asked was I too sensitive (I can't remember who said it). You were right. I was. I thought she'd take direction immediately. I thought she'd know a firm voice. I knew puppy's bit. I did not know how hard and how much. I had done the research before I got her but living it was different. But she is just a normal puppy albeit a bitey one!

    You need to train her with POSITIVE reinforcement and PRAISE when she does something right. Not "firmness" at that age. Imagine someone speaking to you in a "firm voice" in a foreign language. You have no clue what they mean. When you teach with positive reinforcement (praise, treats) you are teaching what behavior that you want from them. It sounds like she is not any more bitey than any other people. I HIGHLY suggest you go to puppy class with her. don't delay.

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