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Thread: Raise talk at work

  1. #1
    Silver Member BecxyRex's Avatar
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    Raise talk at work

    Hi everyone,

    I'm not quite sure how to handle this situation or know if I'm too pushy or not assertive enough. I'm hoping some folks with more experience in this regard can give me some tips.

    I've been with my company for nearly 6 years (in December) and in all those 6 years I have gotten a $1.76 raise total. Both of those were a part of everyone getting "surprise" raises, so no individual raise.

    Recently, I've noticed that lots of new hires we're getting are already making more than I am. I've heard this in conversations here and there. These people sometimes do the same work I do and come to me for guidance or are sent to me by our supervisor to explain a project. I'm not technically a lead or supervising artist, but I have explained steps to new people, who are making more money right off the bat. It's kind of irritating at this point. I understand that cost of living changes and that they couldn't afford to hire people nowadays for the same wage they had when I was hired, but as an employee of 6 years I feel like I'm falling to the wayside and it's hard to keep up with increasing life costs with the same income.

    Anyway, I asked our HR lady to talk about a potential raise and she was very willing to meet with me 2 days later. During this meeting I explained that I've had good yearly reviews and led a few comic book projects all on my own, from start to finish, with happy clients always. She assured me she'd talk to my supervisor and CFO and will make sure to get the ball rolling in no more than 2 weeks time. This was at the beginning of July.

    I waited for the 2 weeks to be up with no word from her. I approached her a bit after and was told that my supervisor needs an additional 2 weeks to make a decision. He had broken his ankle during that time and was out for a few days, so I understood that times were a little crazy for him.

    The additional 2 weeks were up (a month after our initial meeting) and I approached her again, since I hadn't heard from her. She informed me that my supervisor is on vacation and she would "follow up with him after he got back". He gets back on a Wednesday and I give them the remaining week to hopefully talk about this. On Monday I approach her yet again and get this reply:
    "I should be able to pin xx down next week. I havenít gotten much face time with him since he just got back from being out for a week."

    The week she's trying to pin him down passes with no word from her. I sent her a message again yesterday asking if she was able to get face time with him last week and have not gotten a response from her at all. I sent the message at 11:30 am yesterday...

    I have no idea what to do at this point. I don't want to be annoying, since I'm sure they haven't forgotten about my request, but I don't want to be too passive either. I understand I might not get a raise at all, but this waiting state has me stressed. I'd rather just know and go from there, potentially rethink my employment here depending on the answer I get.

    I've heard through the grapevine that she's been seeing the doctor a few times for vertigo and I understand she's got a lot to do. I just find this constant delay stressful and it's eating at my own motivation to do good work. I still do my best, but I'm starting to feel very under appreciated and am dreading to even go in sometimes. Any advice?

    Thanks for reading!

  2. #2
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    I think it may be helpful to understand your company's financial situation and while it's a request, it's not a promise. Do you know when the fiscal year end is? I think you would be a good candidate for a raise given your history and track record. Try to be patient for a little while. Is there something bothering you at home or anything you need to take care of (requiring money)?

    It's also a good idea to keep a low profile when discussing salary figures within the company (with other staff). I wouldn't let on that you know what other people make too openly especially with management as you may appear differently from how you intend to come across. Continue doing a great job at your work. I understand it can be frustrating not being compensated adequately.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    Do some research on the company you work for. Dig deep and find out who they hire, and what they pay.

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    Wiseman offers good advice... i believe the same. Its a difficult situation to be in, maybe wait another wee and enquire?

    If you have hard facts, that X is paid such... and Y is paid such and are new starters who come to you for training and advice, then it is evidence based and better.

    However, in some companies I believe it is illegal to know others salaries, or frowned upon? I don't know how true this is but I am sure it is a thing, or people have the legal right for it to be private.

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    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    I think it may be helpful to understand your company's financial situation and while it's a request, it's not a promise. Do you know when the fiscal year end is? I think you would be a good candidate for a raise given your history and track record. Try to be patient for a little while. Is there something bothering you at home or anything you need to take care of (requiring money)?

    It's also a good idea to keep a low profile when discussing salary figures within the company (with other staff). I wouldn't let on that you know what other people make too openly especially with management as you may appear differently from how you intend to come across. Continue doing a great job at your work. I understand it can be frustrating not being compensated adequately.
    This also, worth knowing facts and figures but staying discreet also.

    Its a difficult one! can see both sides. I am sure its a legal right to keep salary secret also? Atleast, in the UK?

  7. #6
    Silver Member BecxyRex's Avatar
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    Technically we're not supposed to know how much everyone makes. I'm not sure about it being illegal or not. People are very lose with this info though and I overheard them talk about it on multiple occasions. I wasn't planning on using this information in my talk with HR and supervisor though.

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    Good call, I think if you just state your time there, the extra responsibilities you've taken on and how much you've grown etc... courses, training you have attended...

    It is always tricky with money! It as the same where I used to work, we weren't supposed to know what people earnt, but we all knew!

  9. #8
    Silver Member BecxyRex's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Rose Mosse
    Is there something bothering you at home or anything you need to take care of (requiring money)?
    Just cost of living in general is rising, especially in the city I live in it seems. Daycare cost is increasing this month for example. I'm finding myself penny pinching more than usual and we don't live a lavish lifestyle.
    My wage is also lower compared to friends who work in the same field, but different companies. I like the atmosphere of my workplace and after all these years I feel comfortable here, I just feel like I'm stuck financially and it's getting harder to live as costs rise.

  10. #9
    Gold Member SarahLancaster's Avatar
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    I haven't read all of the responses, but have you looked into switching companies?

  11. #10
    Platinum Member Wiseman2's Avatar
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    I would still look into the going rate for your job, area and experience. It never hurts. Even though I also would not use that data openly in your negotiations, having that info in your back pocket can give you confidence. That info is very searchable. For example say nurses typically earn $X as a starting rate in NYC and $Y after 5 years, but you are earning $Z then you have more to evaluate. You have to know your worth to negotiate. That raise doesn't even seem consistent with cost of living increases.

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