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Thread: Believing You Have ADHD

  1. #11
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    I know it is not a kid thing . My husband still has it significantly as an adult . What you read are they actually peer reviewed medical articles ?

    ADHD and autism are considered developmental disorder , neurodiverse disorders.
    Originally Posted by katrina1980
    I have no idea S, but you can Google it if interested, medical articles saying it's not just a kid thing, can develop in adults too.

    Just going by what I briefly read.

  2. #12
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    Being bipolar is also considered neuro diverse .

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    Honey, please see your doctor.

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    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    I think what you're describing is normal. If it's not hindering your cognition in any way and you can meet deadlines just fine, you might be just going through the normal processes of old(er) age and tendency not to be as interested in everything you read. What I tend to do is read the first and last sentences of every paragraph or block of text. I get the beginning and the end at the same time and then if I'm interested I go through the middle. It's a trick I learned years ago in university so this isn't something I've developed recently. If I'm not interested, I move to the next issue. My text for non-leisure items (work) is very short.

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    Originally Posted by katrina1980
    Thanks dias I'll try it!

    I feel a bit better now knowing I'm not alone and that there's hope (without meds). xx
    Personally I believe meds is the last resort. We are all born different. There are many traits I wish I had which I don't (I curse God but he doesn’t respond lol) . However getting meds for improving your performance in something it's not always the best imo. It's like saying " I will use steroids because I am not a mesomorph and I don't build muscles as fast as other people".

    Plus, meds are treating the symptom. But if you can find a way to treat the symptom without meds, why take meds?

    The patience part is something I can't give advice as I am extremely impatient myself (and I haven't found a way to treat this symptom unfortunately lol )

    Good luck with the LSAT :)

  7. #16
    Gold Member SarahLancaster's Avatar
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    Are you a heavy user of computers and social media? It's been shown that too much time on the screen can reduce your ability to focus.

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    Originally Posted by SarahLancaster
    Are you a heavy user of computers and social media? It's been shown that too much time on the screen can reduce your ability to focus.
    The computer Yes, but social media No.

    My job as a paralegal requires me to be on computer at least 8-9 hours a day, then at home I am always researching something of interest or listening to/watching music and other videos.

    And now studying takes up much of my free time.

    So from almost the minute I wake up until bed time, I'm on the computer!'

    But Rose made a good point, perhaps as I get older, i've simply lost patience for things I'm not that interested in.

    Edit: Thanks dias for well wishes on LSAT!

  9. #18
    Platinum Member Fudgie's Avatar
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    Echoing boltnrun. Bipolar without medication can manifest in the symptoms you're describing. The manic part of bipolar disorder is not always as crazy as TV or movies would have it. You can find yourself flitting from one task to another, unable to concentrate on 1 thing for an extended time.

    I have a friend who has bipolar and when she doesn't take her meds or if she drinks, it's like she had ADHD and acts weirdly. Makes her difficult to be around and that's why I won't go to a bar with her anymore.

    You really need to see a doctor and get properly treated if it's affecting your life like this. Yes, meds can suck (I take meds for depression and anxiety for life) but what is the alternative?

  10. #19
    Platinum Member bluecastle's Avatar
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    I agree with Rose that this sounds pretty normal. Frustrating, yes, but also one of those normal things we go through.

    I'm a big reader, for instance, and can go weeks and months devouring novels and long articles at light speed. A big love of mine, big source of comfort and identity, and critically connected to what I do for a living. And yet: sometimes I go through periods where I can hardly read a paragraph, where I go months without cracking open a book. Typically these periods are triggered by a general sense of unrest, or a pivot, a potent transitional moment.

    You've made some big changes in your life in recent months, and are setting out on a new journey with law school. It would be strange if you weren't a little scattered, mentally. If you're able to focus on LSAT prep right now but unable to focus on a novel or one of my rambling posts here—all good. Natural. Wouldn't jump straight into the diagnostics since that can be it's own amplifier of the very thing you're looking to quell.

    I periodically give myself little challenges when I feel I've lost a bit of my focus, attention. Say I'm in a phase where I can happily binge watch TV but can't read the New York Times. I'll acknowledge that, but then "force" myself to read one article in full for the "reward" of watching TV. Often the scales recenter, with some time, patience, and low-grade commitment. Before I know it, I'm reading more again, watching less TV.

    And, yeah, sometimes we lose interest in things that once held our attention. Yoga has been a big part of my life for many years—a source of joy, of stability. But I haven't been feeling it lately—started doing a little workout with one of my instructor's husbands, which has been more interesting these days. And a friend moved to town who I surf with, so now I'm in the water more. Feels kind of weird, almost "wrong," to not want to get on the mat—but so it goes. I'll probably be back. Just a cycle.

    You're in a moment where "optimization" is a priority—new chapters, new challenges. Exciting. Could be that, in this mindset, you're hyper-aware of the places where you're not "optimized" or less "optimized" where you once were. I say give yourself some breathing room. As long as you're doing things that benefit you you're doing great. Sometimes those things just change shape.

  11. #20
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    Originally Posted by Fudgie
    Echoing boltnrun. Bipolar without medication can manifest in the symptoms you're describing. The manic part of bipolar disorder is not always as crazy as TV or movies would have it. You can find yourself flitting from one task to another, unable to concentrate on 1 thing for an extended time.

    I have a friend who has bipolar and when she doesn't take her meds or if she drinks, it's like she had ADHD and acts weirdly. Makes her difficult to be around and that's why I won't go to a bar with her anymore.

    You really need to see a doctor and get properly treated if it's affecting your life like this. Yes, meds can suck (I take meds for depression and anxiety for life) but what is the alternative?
    I echo this . I can totally tell when my dad is not taking his meds or is manic.

    Actually Katrina , I can tell when you are in a more manic phase.

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