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Thread: Left out by co workers time 500 and sneleventy

  1. #11
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by 1a1a
    Punctuality is an ongoing struggle. Greatly exacerbated on days where achieving it means going into sleep debt because we just worked 14 hours the day before and are expected to do it all again with an 8 hour gap between shiftís end and journeyís start. Or when she wants to leave bang on 10 on a travel day when we have no time commitments in the destination location, apparently we just want to get in on the agreed upon time. We agreed upon an arrival time? I donít remember being part of that conversation. If Iíd been a part of that conversation I might have said I would rather not have time pressure about leaving and arrive when we arrive since this isnít actually a work day and I use up all my running on time mana on work days.
    You always have an excuse.

    Why be late after you have been once and she didn't like it? Make a time that you both can negotiate and agree upon if you are doing something together off work hours. If you are to be at work at a set time, then be there. No excuses. That is life and you will find your life a whole lot more calm and copacetic if you adhere to the rules set out like everyone else does that is happy and successful, calm and confident. Its up to you. You only have one life so make the best of it.

  2. #12
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    This reminds me of a work orientation I attended in the 1990s. The leader said "what do you do if you miss a deadline?" (meaning the crucial type that was under discussion). Her answer "you don't". Fair? I don't know. Part of the job? Yes, take it or leave it. So I agreed with her response. That's how important punctuality is especially at work.

  3. #13
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    This reminds me of a work orientation I attended in the 1990s. The leader said "what do you do if you miss a deadline?" (meaning the crucial type that was under discussion). Her answer "you don't". Fair? I don't know. Part of the job? Yes, take it or leave it. So I agreed with her response. That's how important punctuality is especially at work.
    The other factor is, someone else has to take up the slack when a coworker is late or absent.

    Last week I had to stay an extra half hour to cover for one of my employees who didn't show up on time. If I hadn't, the department would have had no coverage and that can't happen.

    If there's travel involved and being late makes the others late, that's extra inconsiderate.

    Keep that in mind when you're wondering why the others don't include you in off-work activities. There most likely is resentment built up.

  4. #14
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    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    The other factor is, someone else has to take up the slack when a coworker is late or absent.

    Last week I had to stay an extra half hour to cover for one of my employees who didn't show up on time. If I hadn't, the department would have had no coverage and that can't happen.

    If there's travel involved and being late makes the others late, that's extra inconsiderate.

    Keep that in mind when you're wondering why the others don't include you in off-work activities. There most likely is resentment built up.
    Yes, I agree and I have had to do that as well or have the added stress in general. One time we had a very strict deadline and my colleague was late to do her part in another area of the building (meaning I couldn't be in two places at once)-I was having a near (and silent) panic attack. When she finally reached me to tell me she'd arrived her first comment was "darn I just broke a nail". That told me quite a lot about her work ethic.

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  6. #15
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    I have a friend who suffers from depression, a lack of motivation and mood swings. He is one of the nicest people I know and I enjoy spending time with him.

    However because of his issues, he is completely unreliable. I personally feel that he uses his depression as an excuse for laziness and sloppiness, though I am not in his head, so perhaps that is a little harsh. In any case the fact is that because of his long history of being late or not turning up to various gatherings, nobody relies on him for anything, so naturally he is sometimes excluded from things where reliability is important, like trips, for example. We are not being mean, but we cannot plan for him to drive one of the cars on a road trip if we are not sure he will wake up in the right mindset to get out of bed and drive.

    The world does not revolve around your feelings and needs OP. People tend to respond to others based on how you treat them and how you present yourself. I can come across a little ly and a bit aloof, so I don't tend to make lots of friends and I can even antagonize some people. My very introverted girlfriend is a people-pleaser who is nice to everyone, so despite her introversion, she is popular among the people who know her because she is never disagreeable or unpleasant company. In some ways, other people are a mirror who reflect upon yourself. Stop blaming the outside world for your problems, look within yourself and reflect honestly on what you can do better.

  7. #16
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    I agree MirrorKnight -been in similar situations.

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