Facebook share
LinkedIn share
Google plus share
Twitter plus share
Give Advice
Ask For Advice
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Advice on slight shift in career due to industry slump

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    8

    Advice on slight shift in career due to industry slump

    Hi everyone! I have worked as a freelance translator for the last ten years and I have had a very steady stream of work up until very recently. I started a master degree in a specialisation subject two years ago that I am now completing, in order to enter more niche markets and deal with the increasing automisation of general translation.

    However, the industry has really taken a hit due to Brexit and work just pretty much dried up this year. I have never experienced such a drought in the ten years I have been working. While I knew the market was changing quite rapidly, I thought I'd have several more years to work out a plan B, but alas, that was not to be, and I now have to think and act fast as I have a small child and am the sole earner in the family.

    Does anyone know or have experience of career counsellors for people who are looking for a career shift (rather than a total career change)? After finishing a gruelling two-year master (that is preety much useless to me now), I just can't face the thought of taking on another post-graduate (or other) course, but I would love to find out about other shorter courses I could do and/or areas that are somewhat related to my experience and training that I might be able to look at.

    My apologies for my rambling post, any help/advice very welcome!

    Kind regards, I.

  2. #2
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    50,156
    How about joining professional organizations or associations?

  3. #3
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    2,035
    Gender
    Female
    If you're a translator I can only imagine that you're likely very capable linguistically and quite clear in your communication. Sometimes that's all you need for most jobs. Why not ask your mentor or someone you know at your university whether they are willing to take you on for more training or courses as a language instructor and become a teacher? You can pair this with a diploma in teaching or try your hand at teaching more than one language. You may have to start small and at irregular hours/irregular pay tutoring or teaching at a smaller college or private colleges but it's a start while you add more items to your resume.

    You may even apply to teaching positions in your university where you have just studied or go back to your alma mater where you studied your undergraduate degree and see what they are posting for jobs on campus. Many campuses have job boards for private classes and tutoring options also if you are open to it. Speak with your current clients also and once you have enough training as a teacher, you can always put the word out that you are transitioning to a teacher. I suspect you're likely wanting something more regular in terms of hours and with some benefits/extended benefits for your child.

    I think it depends what you're willing to do and how much of a pay cut you're willing to take starting out in a new(er) area or industry. I'd work with your current skills and continue building with newer skills also even if it means taking night courses or looking into part time opportunities and working more hours in order to see whether something suits you or whether you're really interested in it before paying out for extra training.

  4. #4
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    23,943
    Gender
    Female
    I know at least in my country, lots of law offices and hospitals want translators -- to talk to someone's relative from "the old country" that is on a legal agreement, to talk to a vacationers unexpectedly in a hospital. Maybe you need to "look" for your own work -- it helps if you understand legal terms and medical terminology. Lots of this is done over the phone where the translator is put on the phone. Also, is the language you translate in demand? Can you learn another language in addition? I know in my area, there is more and more demand for Chinese, Russian, and Portuguese translators. Spanish only for advanced terminology. Different areas are different. And yes, language tutoring might be a good move for you, too

  5.  

  6. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    23,943
    Gender
    Female
    BTW, lots of people i know that speak 2 or three languages apply to companies that are in business or marketing and work internationally - they aren't being a translator per se but are able to speak to clients themselves that are in other countries.


Give Advice
Ask For Advice

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •