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Thread: Chronic coughing from partner

  1. #21
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl

    I can't imagine what his co-workers, or people in restaurants, airplanes, public places, think of this.

    When mine comes on, I move out of the room, as it's awful.
    I don't suffer from anything like what you, Seraphim or others have described, but when I had my pneumonia last March, the cough lingered quite a while afterwards (months actually) and yeah, when I would have coughing "spells," out of sheer courtesy for my co-workers and my boyfriend and friends, I would excuse myself and leave the room!

    I loved what you suggested LHG, perfect! Telling him he needs to get it checked out as it's affecting your relationship (and not in a good way).

    Sometimes you just gotta be blunt like that!
    Last edited by katrina1980; 07-17-2019 at 09:03 PM.

  2. #22
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    I had a chronic cough for 9 months after having had pneumonia. After many chest xrays, my doctor said it was just in my head. He didn't think there was anything wrong with me. But I would get real coughing fits.

    One time the doc went off to a conference, and the nurse practioner called me to see how I was doing. They had a "sudden" opening in their schedule. She suspected a sinus infection and referred me to the ear nose and throat department at the med school. They did a CT scan and found a sinus infection deep in there.

    So it WAS literally in my head!

    It took a few rounds of the right antibiotics. My followup CT was so markedly different, the doc thought they had pulled the wrong xray films.

    I never went back to that doc again. And I think the staff planned on calling me in when the doc was not there. ..

    If I had a sinus issue again, I would have them culture it so they could target the right antibiotic.

    That said, I have great preventative practices with a saline rinse from Neilmed called Sinus Rinse. You need to make sure it is sterile water though.

    You have many other ideas here and none of us is a medical professional. The possibility of a tic was mentioned, and I have encountered a few individuals with Tourette Syndrome whose tics presented as throat clearing.

  3. #23
    Platinum Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    You're 25 and he's 31. Is there any chance that this is a committed(long term type of) relationship or are both of you not sure of what the future holds? At 25 I was in a relationship too but I definitely didn't see myself with the person I was with long term. You've been dating a year and that's enough to worry over and fall in love with someone. I can understand if you are concerned about him. You aren't married and you haven't been together long enough either where you have any real say over what he does over this cough of his, to be honest with you, so I agree with JMan in the thread. I personally wouldn't overstep those bounds and I wouldn't trouble myself over getting super serious about the issue either if it's not a relationship I see myself in for the very long term. The reason is I'd simply respect the other person not to push too hard (it's just not completely my business to begin with especially if it's easy enough to limit time spent together).

    The way I see it is: it depends on what he means to you as a partner and how honest and blunt you want to be. A relationship should challenge us to be brave and say things (honest things) that we wouldn't normally say in an effort to bring more honesty and transparency in that union but it shouldn't bring out the jitters in you or cause you to feel nervous and terrified of how the other person may react. He doesn't seem like a mean guy from the sounds of it (or what little you mentioned so far) so I don't see why you can't have a more detailed conversation if you think this is a person you're very serious about.

  4. #24
    Gold Member Gary Snyder's Avatar
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    This is a question for a medical doctor. I'm only a luv doctor!

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  6. #25
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    My entire family, including myself, clears their throat, and we are f-in loud, and it's gross, but it's a complete tic. It won't go away!

    BUTTTTT, I went to an ENT about my sleep apnea yesterday, and along with that, it was also discovered I had gotten polyps in my left nasal cavity, eeekkk, from chronic untreated sinus allergies that I just never treated, and if left untreated, I would suffer major sinus issues. So now, I am getting a procedure next month, and going to see an allergist next week.

    So you know what, have him check with an allergist. Never hurts.

  7. #26
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    When I had a cough like this in the fall, it wouldn't go away even after I was treated with an antibiotic for a cold. The cold had been bad enough for me to accept the antibiotics, which I haven't done since I was a child. So the doc sent me to an ears, nose throat specialist, who said the quickest way to learn whether it's from an an allergy is to take two over-the-counter antihistamines. One, a nasal spray, Flonase or a generic, and the other, Allegra tablets or a generic. Neither should contain a decongestant, because the nasal passages should be lubricated, not dried out. Saline spray can be used to clear the nasal passaged before the antihistamine spray dose.

    In my case, the coughing stopped immediately. I'd had had allergies when younger, but it was all about sneezing, not coughing. But allergies can present in different ways over time, and if BF wants to try ruling out--or ruling in--an allergy, OTC could be one of the most inexpensive ways to do that.

  8. #27
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    It sounds like a habit or a tic to be honest. Its telling by the way he seems to be indifferent with you when you bring it up. If he didn't always do it, he would listen to you and go to a doctor about it considering he is in the health field.

    What to say? How about just asking him if he's aware of what he just did (say when he does it on the phone) and see how he responds. If he says yes, then ask him to try and not do it while on the phone because it goes right through your head. Then change the subject.

    If it is a tic, he won't stop it. I think If it's just a habit and he's been made to acknowledge that he's done or doing it, he will make the effort to stop it.

  9. #28
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    I just did some research on tic cough and here's what I found:

    A habit cough (also known inappropriately as psychogenic cough, tic cough, and somatic cough disorder) is a cough that may develop in children or adolescents after a cold or other airway irritant. Similar symptoms have been less frequently reported in adults but may not be the same disorder as is seen in children or adolescents.

    First described in 1966 in a small series treated by "the art of suggestion, further publications identified patients with the same symptoms treated effectively with suggestion therapy. The average age has been reported as 10 years at clinics in Iowa, Minnesota, and London England. Eighty-five percent of 120 children diagnosed with habit cough over 20 years in Iowa were between ages 8 and 14 with a range from 5 to 18.[5] Based on experience in Iowa and London, major referral centers for children may be expected to encounter at least 7-9 per year.

    Habit [tic] cough is characterized by a harsh barking cough, and becomes persistent for weeks to months. The cough's hallmarks are severe frequency, often a cough every 2Ė3 seconds, and the lack of other symptoms such as fever. The child can have trouble falling asleep but once asleep will not cough. Absence once asleep is considered a essential.


    So while nothing should be ruled out, the fact that it mostly afflicts children and the harsh barking cough (versus the build up and clearing of phlegm like what your boyfriend suffers from) would suggest it's not a tic cough but something else.

    And that he needs to see a doctor asap.

  10. #29
    Platinum Member ThatwasThen's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by katrina1980
    I just did some research on tic cough and here's what I found:

    A habit cough (also known inappropriately as psychogenic cough, tic cough, and somatic cough disorder) is a cough that may develop in children or adolescents after a cold or other airway irritant. Similar symptoms have been less frequently reported in adults but may not be the same disorder as is seen in children or adolescents.

    First described in 1966 in a small series treated by "the art of suggestion, further publications identified patients with the same symptoms treated effectively with suggestion therapy. The average age has been reported as 10 years at clinics in Iowa, Minnesota, and London England. Eighty-five percent of 120 children diagnosed with habit cough over 20 years in Iowa were between ages 8 and 14 with a range from 5 to 18.[5] Based on experience in Iowa and London, major referral centers for children may be expected to encounter at least 7-9 per year.

    Habit [tic] cough is characterized by a harsh barking cough, and becomes persistent for weeks to months. The cough's hallmarks are severe frequency, often a cough every 2Ė3 seconds, and the lack of other symptoms such as fever. The child can have trouble falling asleep but once asleep will not cough. Absence once asleep is considered a essential.


    So while nothing should be ruled out, the fact that it mostly afflicts children and the harsh barking cough (versus the build up and clearing of phlegm like what your boyfriend suffers from) would suggest it's not a tic cough but something else.

    And that he needs to see a doctor asap.
    Thanks for the info, Kat but there is always an exception to the rule. My neighbour's daughter who is 40 years old has had the same type of cough as described by the Op and has been diagnosed as it being a habit/tic. There has been nothing physiological found to attribute her "bark" followed by clearing of the throat of mucus. She does it more when she is under any kind of stress.

    My daughter had the same thing as described in your quote (annoying as ....) thank goodness she outgrew that. She sounded like a agitated beagle when she had tests or exams coming up at school. lol

  11. #30
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    Hey T, oh I agree there are exceptions which is why I said nothing (including a tic) should be ruled out.

    And that the research I found only "suggests" it's something else, not that it definitely is something else.

    Hope that clarifies. :)

    I still wanted to stress how important it is to be checked out by a doctor though, I mean although it sounds like it could be a tic, it's always better to be safe than sorry, Imo anyway.

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