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Thread: Issued a final warning at work - I have questions

  1. #31
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by WithLove
    Thanks for that suggestion - I did actually come in about 10 minutes earlier today than usual. It felt good to get a jumpstart on getting my coffee and saying "good morning" to the few that were here already on my way to my office. I was already logged in and working when the rest of my department showed up, and I can't deny that it felt good. Last night I told the bf that I would be getting up with him from now on so that I make it to work earlier. He gets up a half hour before me usually.
    This IS fabulous! Yes, even 10 carefully placed minutes can be a big perception changer, because it positions you as visible and working during a time that you were previously absent.

    Your empty desk is one of the key messages that spoke volumes FOR you, and to everyone. If you're able to skootch in a few minutes earlier and earlier each day until you find your 'sweet spot,' you may find that getting up to use the bathroom before BF could buy you a half hour to an hour earlier.

    OR, that may not work for you. The point is to adopt the most workable routine to enable yourself to be consistently improved. This is a marathon for the duration, not a sprint. Setting yourself up to peter out and fall back into bad habits is not an option.

    You've said that you are happy with this job, so you're ahead of the game in terms of motivation. It's far more difficult to right the wrongs of self sabotage while peddling uphill against a job you hate, so keep refreshing your feelings of appreciation and gratitude for your coworkers, this role, and everything else you enjoy about this job.

    Discussing this warning with your BF, your family, or any friend who might be able to assist you to make your private life more orderly could relieve some pressure and prevent backsliding. For instance, if your injury could have been caused by a lack of mindfulness of your surroundings because your focus was diverted by chaotic thinking or anxiety, then addressing those foundational issues may prevent further incidents that could sabotage your success.

    You may also want to consider this wakeup call a positive turning point in your career and your lifestyle. It may help you to declutter, decompress, and relax into a newfound competence that was somehow 'blocked' before. If you are spiritually minded, you may want to consider the loved one for whom you cared and lost as an impetus for a new beginning. Tap into the energies this person may have passed onto you as a legacy, and voice a goal of making this person proud of your commitment to accomplishment.

  2. #32
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    Originally Posted by mustlovedogs
    10 minutes isnít really much of anything. If youíre trying to step up, I think 30 minutes would be noticeable.
    One step at a time. Going very early in the office doesn't mean a thing. I am 20-30 minutes early because I don't have anything to do in the morning, it doesn't mean anything.

    OP 10 minutes earlier is fine. No need to go 30 minutes earlier. But when you work you should try to be concetrated. This is difficult. You can stay in the office 16 hours and still not be productive if you are not focused on what you are doing.

    Keep up the good work OP :)

  3. #33
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by dias
    One step at a time. Going very early in the office doesn't mean a thing. I am 20-30 minutes early because I don't have anything to do in the morning, it doesn't mean anything.

    OP 10 minutes earlier is fine. No need to go 30 minutes earlier. But when you work you should try to be concetrated. This is difficult. You can stay in the office 16 hours and still not be productive if you are not focused on what you are doing.

    Keep up the good work OP :)
    I agree with the encouragement. I don't agree that any of us can tell you exactly how many early minutes are 'meaningful', or not, given your unique office culture and when you work best.

    There are two goals that we shouldn't conflate: 1) Perceptions of your effort--meaning, maximum exposure, or 'being seen' as making tangible changes, and 2) Actual effort--putting in the time and focus to catch up your work.

    My suggestion to show up early was to address the first goal--the visibility. You'll discover with experience the best time to show up for maximum payoff. The rest, the actual effort, is intuitive based on whether you're a better morning worker or an evening worker.

    My point was merely that evening work may be great for catching up, but unless your culture includes a lot of late fellow workers, it's impacts will be eventual rather than immediate. So showing up early is your best bet for an immediate statement regardless of how much additional time you invest at night.

    Head high, and enjOy.

  4. #34
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    Originally Posted by catfeeder
    I agree with the encouragement. I don't agree that any of us can tell you exactly how many early minutes are 'meaningful', or not, given your unique office culture and when you work best.

    There are two goals that we shouldn't conflate: 1) Perceptions of your effort--meaning, maximum exposure, or 'being seen' as making tangible changes, and 2) Actual effort--putting in the time and focus to catch up your work.

    My suggestion to show up early was to address the first goal--the visibility. You'll discover with experience the best time to show up for maximum payoff. The rest, the actual effort, is intuitive based on whether you're a better morning worker or an evening worker.

    My point was merely that evening work may be great for catching up, but unless your culture includes a lot of late fellow workers, it's impacts will be eventual rather than immediate. So showing up early is your best bet for an immediate statement regardless of how much additional time you invest at night.

    Head high, and enjOy.
    True! I didn't emphasize much on this because I don't function based on the "being seen" perception. However, I've been told many times that 50% is the actual work and another 50% is "showing off" (for lack of better words) your work. And it's true that you need to do both in the corporate world.

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  6. #35
    Platinum Member WithLove's Avatar
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    Thanks all!

    I've been making small notes on post-its for the past few weeks in order to keep focused on getting things done. I intersperse the things I don't like doing as much within the stuff I do well/feel proud of, so that I still get my job done and don't feel like I'm ignoring the things I dislike. For example, one thing that I'm responsible for is getting certain things out in the mail, and to me it's tedious and time-consuming. I would put it off until the past part of the day and then I sometimes would not get the project done before it was time to leave, meaning things wouldn't get out til the next day. I've been adding it on my post-it note everyday as one of the first things to do so that this project gets done before noon, so that I'm positive it'll go out in that day's mail. And then, when I see that it's been crossed off my list, I feel happy because it's a task I dislike doing and I've made sure that I completed it. It feels good to see things crossed off my list.

  7. #36
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by WithLove
    Thanks all!

    I've been making small notes on post-its for the past few weeks in order to keep focused on getting things done. I intersperse the things I don't like doing as much within the stuff I do well/feel proud of, so that I still get my job done and don't feel like I'm ignoring the things I dislike. For example, one thing that I'm responsible for is getting certain things out in the mail, and to me it's tedious and time-consuming. I would put it off until the past part of the day and then I sometimes would not get the project done before it was time to leave, meaning things wouldn't get out til the next day. I've been adding it on my post-it note everyday as one of the first things to do so that this project gets done before noon, so that I'm positive it'll go out in that day's mail. And then, when I see that it's been crossed off my list, I feel happy because it's a task I dislike doing and I've made sure that I completed it. It feels good to see things crossed off my list.
    This is great stuff! Go you!

  8. #37
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    Originally Posted by WithLove
    Thanks all!

    I've been making small notes on post-its for the past few weeks in order to keep focused on getting things done. I intersperse the things I don't like doing as much within the stuff I do well/feel proud of, so that I still get my job done and don't feel like I'm ignoring the things I dislike. For example, one thing that I'm responsible for is getting certain things out in the mail, and to me it's tedious and time-consuming. I would put it off until the past part of the day and then I sometimes would not get the project done before it was time to leave, meaning things wouldn't get out til the next day. I've been adding it on my post-it note everyday as one of the first things to do so that this project gets done before noon, so that I'm positive it'll go out in that day's mail. And then, when I see that it's been crossed off my list, I feel happy because it's a task I dislike doing and I've made sure that I completed it. It feels good to see things crossed off my list.
    Great progress! All jobs have an amount of tedium. Mine always has, my part time job does now, so does my mom job. I'm so glad you're tackling what is tedious first -great strategy! I am concerned with your comment above that you're willing to do extra work even though you're not paid for it. Are you hourly? Do you punch a clock? If you do I get it -it's actually "extra" but it sounds like with all your absences and mistakes you kind of owe them extra time plus if you're a professional or want to be professional the "overtime" label morphs into "part of the job" if your goal is professional development.

    I've been on the receiving end of people who are late/unreliable. It sucks. It's mean a lot of stress for me when there's a deadline, extra work, unpredictable workloads scrambling to do the job that wasn't done or done badly and for many years my mentor was a person who never ever wanted to hear that someone else on the team was unreliable - we were all supposed to take it on the chin for each other. And it was so bad that sometimes I just had to tell him because it simply was unfair for me to look awful because coworker -again- didn't show up/was unreliable . So I'm glad you're taking this seriously!!! Good luck!!

  9. #38
    Platinum Member WithLove's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I am concerned with your comment above that you're willing to do extra work even though you're not paid for it. Are you hourly? Do you punch a clock? If you do I get it -it's actually "extra" but it sounds like with all your absences and mistakes you kind of owe them extra time plus if you're a professional or want to be professional the "overtime" label morphs into "part of the job" if your goal is professional development.
    I punch in and I'm hourly, yes. I'm aware that this method (working extra) can/will cause burnout, but it's what I need to do right now to make sure my stuff gets done. I just started a class at a college here and I have to leave promptly at 5 pm to get there on time, 3 nights a week, which is why I'm looking forward to when our company program moves to the cloud-based one so that I can access from home and still make sure that I'm on top of everything. Luckily, this class is a "math for dummies" class that is only about 6 weeks long, so this high-paced schedule won't be affecting me for long. I've just got to concentrate and focus!

  10. #39
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    Originally Posted by WithLove
    I punch in and I'm hourly, yes. I'm aware that this method (working extra) can/will cause burnout, but it's what I need to do right now to make sure my stuff gets done. I just started a class at a college here and I have to leave promptly at 5 pm to get there on time, 3 nights a week, which is why I'm looking forward to when our company program moves to the cloud-based one so that I can access from home and still make sure that I'm on top of everything. Luckily, this class is a "math for dummies" class that is only about 6 weeks long, so this high-paced schedule won't be affecting me for long. I've just got to concentrate and focus!
    No I didn't mean burnout from working past your time clock. I meant that people who are professionals or aspire to be professionals don't focus on the clock or that they are hourly. I am hourly for the first time now since the early 1990s other than a part time summer job during grad school where I think we were hourly. And I still don't look at the clock -I do to make sure I account for my time appropriately but if something needs to be done, and I can possibly get it done -within the boundaries of my part time program (which means more boundaries than when I was on call, full time, etc for many years I do it). I am not saying this to brag but that means things like taking a call at 7:30am when I am on the treadmill and doing follow up work including a conference call an hour later -all before "working hours" - and working all weekend to help my boss meet a deadline, working right after a tooth extraction while my husband was away. And I took a huge paycut for this job so I could telework and do part time. But it's in my blood, my work ethic to work this way. Yes, I probably care "too much" - I probably could scale back and it would be fine. I'm just sharing a mindset if you want to work as a professional. If you don't it is TOTALLY fine if you want to do more of a 9 to 5 job that has less growth potential and less potential to be considered a professional at what you do. I don't say this to say being a professional is better than having a job - at all. It's a fit thing, it's a desire thing. I mostly love what I do. I've mostly loved it for the 18 years plus I've done it.

    As far as your class - if your boss is supportive of that class and is ok with you leaving in time to make the class, fine. If he's not or she's not it's on you.

    Yes it will be better when you can work from home. And be mindful that that is often a privilege and they need to see that you will be as productive as you are in the office.

    I probably have a stronger opinion than others on this. I've felt this way since I was 15 and planned out my professional path. I'm in my 50s and still feel the same. Others might disagree and that's totally fine - all different perspectives.

  11. #40
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    Had a meeting yesterday with the couple people in my department and we discussed things/clients. I took on a couple things to do on my own and the boss let me. Excited to show that I am an asset!

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