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Thread: Work situation - team members not pulling their weight

  1. #11
    Platinum Member mustlovedogs's Avatar
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    Itís clearly not actually ďrequiredĒ if they arenít attending and thereís no negative repercussions. Why should they change their behavior?

    I would talk to your coworkers and say itís too much for you and youd like if they step up. Itís possible they donít feel their presence matters, so they donít want to attend. Maybe delegating responsibilities would help?

  2. #12
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    Originally Posted by mustlovedogs
    Itís clearly not actually ďrequiredĒ if they arenít attending and thereís no negative repercussions. Why should they change their behavior?

    I would talk to your coworkers and say itís too much for you and youd like if they step up. Itís possible they donít feel their presence matters, so they donít want to attend. Maybe delegating responsibilities would help?
    It is required. It's not being upheld by people above me.

    Like I said earlier, it's like a nurse who doesn't show up for her shift, but the boss looks the other way, but she gets paid anyway, and the other nurses have to take on her patients. It's required, but it's being allowed to happen.

    I do like your suggestion about talking to my coworkers and saying it's too much for me, asking if they'll step up. A direct approach. I like it. We all get along, and I genuinely like everyone, but I just need them to do their part, without feeling like I'm asking them a favor. It's not a favor. It's their job.

    And you're right, it's possible they feel their presence doesn't matter, but that's irrelevant, as it's all of our job. I don't feel like some of my job responsibilities matter, but I get paid to do them. So I have to word it such that it's just part of the job, and that's that.

    I also like your suggestion about delegating responsibilities. I'm a senior level person, and they look at me as such. So possibly delegating, will give them actual timelines, etc.

    So, both of your suggestions are great, MLD, and I appreciate them!

  3. #13
    Platinum Member mustlovedogs's Avatar
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    I know when Iím in meetings and my opinion isnít needed or wanted, I feel like Iím just a wallflower so itís a wasted meeting (or a waste of time for me to be there at least). So having input can empower them

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    Originally Posted by mustlovedogs
    I know when Iím in meetings and my opinion isnít needed or wanted, I feel like Iím just a wallflower so itís a wasted meeting (or a waste of time for me to be there at least). So having input can empower them
    Very true, especially for our newest team member, who just graduated from college. She's actually one of the ones who jumps up to attend everything, and it's so much appreciated by me. But, I can most definitely help her by asking for her opinion and utilizing her ideas, as I can now see from your comments that it's possibly she feels "smaller" than me, like she's going along with what I tell her to do, rather than asking for her feedback and using it, as these meetings are for all of us.

    Actually, this new girl is kicking a**, working really hard, but I feel she always defers to me, when in reality, she has the same job I do, just a few years below me (lol). By asking her opinion and using it, I can help her feel empowered.

    Since I'm senior level to her, and I've done oh, 14 million of these meetings, I can go on auto-pilot, and sort of just tell everyone what to do. Instead, I need to ask everyone what they want to do, as this way, they'll feel more ownership. I think this will help us all.

    Thanks, MLD, this really helps.

    And thanks to all who have offered opinions, as they've all been valuable!

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  6. #15
    Platinum Member reinventmyself's Avatar
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    I have long learned to adjust my expectation of my coworkers. Everyone's work ethic varies from person to person and if no one is enforcing the attendance, there isn't much you can do about it.

    I used to let it bother me, much like you. In moments like these, I just continue doing what feels right for me and I choose not to worry about the rest.

    Well, that's partly a lie. *I don't let it bother me as much as I used to. I would make myself miserable and no one had the benefit of knowing what was going on in my head. I used to beat that drum of fairness and in the end it got me no where. So, no - and dumbing it down doesn't feel right either. I just choose do the right thing - for me - and let go of the rest.

    It's a gift to yourself actually, because as you are learning, there isn't much you can do to influence the dynamic anyway. Especially if there are no consequences.

    If it makes you feel any better, from where, I sit it's pretty universal.

    I've just a couple instances this week where coworkers have dropped the ball, pretty critical ones and if I let it, it affects me and my job. But I shrug at it now and leave things where they lie. Someone has to clean up and my hands are pretty clean. I used to let it stress me out and on a bad day, I still might. But I am much better at stopping myself from overcompensating, when in turn it rewards others for their under compensating. Meanwhile, things get a little bumpy at times!

    But in the end, I sleep better at night.

  7. #16
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    Originally Posted by reinventmyself
    I have long learned to adjust my expectation of my coworkers. Everyone's work ethic varies from person to person and if no one is enforcing the attendance, there isn't much you can do about it.

    I used to let it bother me, much like you. In moments like these, I just continue doing what feels right for me and I choose not to worry about the rest.

    Well, that's partly a lie. *I don't let it bother me as much as I used to. I would make myself miserable and no one had the benefit of knowing what was going on in my head. I used to beat that drum of fairness and in the end it got me no where. So, no - and dumbing it down doesn't feel right either. I just choose do the right thing - for me - and let go of the rest.

    It's a gift to yourself actually, because as you are learning, there isn't much you can do to influence the dynamic anyway. Especially if there are no consequences.

    If it makes you feel any better, from where, I sit it's pretty universal.

    I've just a couple instances this week where coworkers have dropped the ball, pretty critical ones and if I let it, it affects me and my job. But I shrug at it now and leave things where they lie. Someone has to clean up and my hands are pretty clean. I used to let it stress me out and on a bad day, I still might. But I am much better at stopping myself from overcompensating, when in turn it rewards others for their under compensating. Meanwhile, things get a little bumpy at times!
    But in the end, I sleep better at night.
    So true, especially the bolded.

    I need to let go of what everyone else does, and just do what I need to do. My work ethic is such that, I'll do these meetings, whether they help me or not, 'cause that's just how I roll.

    But if that's not how others roll, and if the boss looks a blind eye, well there's not much I can do about that now, is there? And I've made it very well known to senior level people in my company that I am not interested in a management position, so I am not in a position to judge others, only to do my own job.

    All I can do is the suggestions I've been given: ask for others' opinions, ask them how they'd like the meetings to be run, delegate, etc.

    This helps, guys, whether I sound like it does or not, lol. Thanks to you all.

  8. #17
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    Actually, MLD, I think you've really hit on something with delegating and asking for suggestions.

    On one of these recent meetings, where the other company actually brought people in from out of town for our presentation, our new girl jumped at the chance to attend, while another person did not.

    NewGirl asked me what I wanted from her, and I gave her a couple of ideas that would be helpful. I told her what I'd be doing, so that she'd know we'd both be taking responsibility for x part and y part. She showed up, very engaged, and her participation was terrific.

    During the presentation, she looked at me, as if to ask if it was ok if she said xyz, and I told the room, "NewGirl will be presenting X now", and she did a great job, and afterward, I told her how great she did, and that I was going to tell our boss how great she did (which I did).

    Yesterday, I emailed her to let her know all the meetings that are scheduled for the rest of the year, and she emailed back right away, confirming her attendance at all.

    I need to call her and thank her for the quick email, and to ask her for ideas as to how to best present at these meetings!

    This is SO helpful.

  9. #18
    Platinum Member mustlovedogs's Avatar
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    Yay good, that makes me happy! She probably feels so great about her job and her contributions. I love it when people do things like you describe at work. It may seem small but it has such a big impact (and is super motivating!)

  10. #19
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    Originally Posted by mustlovedogs
    Yay good, that makes me happy! She probably feels so great about her job and her contributions. I love it when people do things like you describe at work. It may seem small but it has such a big impact (and is super motivating!)
    You know, it's like duh, I should know this, as it always makes me feel good when others do this for me.

    But when you've been doing this job as long as I have, you forget it.

    So, I appreciate your input, as it definitely helps!

  11. #20
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by LHGirl
    As per my title, what to do about team members who constantly shirk these extra responsibilities?

    I do it because I feel it's important, and I want to be included, and I want to know what's going on with our work world.

    But I'm starting to feel resentment towards the "vacation schedulers".
    You've semi-answered your own question--you're attending regardless of who else attends because it's important to you. The question I have is, is everyone allow to schedule their vacations at the exact same time? If so, that's the thing to address, and if not, what excuses are people using when they are scheduled for the event but NOT on vacation?

    I'd take a two-pronged approach. Without trying to force boss to force others to attend the meeting, I'd address vacation coverage with boss or HR and ask that the number of people who can vacation at once be limited for coverage purposes. That's a policy decision that makes sense, and the fact that you're spread too thin while 'everyone' vacations at the same time is addressed rather than a push to attend the event. This will either help or not, but it's worth the try.

    Secondly, I'd campaign each coworker individually to ask for their buy-in to assisting you to prep for and attend the event. This way, you can gather specific action items that each will commit to. Milestones of this prep can be raised and discussed by you in status meetings, etc. Otherwise, you can simply keep tabs on managing each of these pieces of the puzzle, as people tend to become more accountable when they've agreed to specific tasks--including which coworker will travel WITH you to the event rather than meet you there.

    Beyond these steps, I'd keep my focus on my own paper. I'm the one who sees value in the events, so I'm the one who steps up for them. If others cannot be motivated to step up through my efforts mentioned above, I'd consider myself privileged with the networking opportunity and I'd see where things land in my review. If my efforts are not rewarded at that time, I'd use the networking opportunities to land a better position in my field.

    Head high, and keep your focus on your own work ethic rather than on the lack of same with anyone else. It will keep you feeling rewarded rather than put upon, and it will either pay off in terms of a tangible reward within your company, OR with another company down the road--as long as you avoid coming off to anyone as martyred.

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