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Thread: Sticky work situation

  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    Sticky work situation

    Hi all,

    I am currently at a crossroads and hoping to get some help.

    I've been at my current company for about 3 years now. I have a local manager (line manager) as well as another manager located abroad although I don't really report to this latter. This manager abroad is the one who overviews my work & assigns tasks to me.

    From the get-go, there's been some slight drama between the local and overseas management because none of them really understood which boundaries to respect in regards to managing me. I'm basically like the child of divorced parents in this situation.

    Anyway, I often travel to the overseas office and the manager over there has been like a mentor to me from the beginning. She gave me the opportunity to work on their biggest clients, has given me amazing reviews and of course, the chance to travel. This has also allowed me to grow my network and gain great reviews from senior management. On the other hand, my local manager is great, but she's still learning the management part of her job and we've had a few issues in the past.

    There's been a high turnover across our department which has lost approximately 2 people every month within the last year, thus leaving only 2 people (aside from management) who have been there for more than 2 years, including me. The department went from 30 FTEs to 8. This environment is very toxic. In this light and in addition to the low salary and boring routine, I started job haunting.

    Late February, I've been offered a trip to the overseas office by the manager over there and I accepted as I hadn't yet received responses on my job applications. Basically, today I found out the overseas manager supposedly booked & organized the trip without informing my direct manager. Thus, for a week straight, I had no clue my own manager didn't know. She's obviously not happy.

    I'm due to travel this weekend, but I have a few things happening today:
    1. I also found out a contract role I had applied for is being offered to me as a permanent contract, the high salary & title. It's a top auditing/consulting firm.

    The woman who interviewed me went to the same school I did abroad, so she knows my credentials are solid unlike my local management who didn't even finish high school.

    2. I was also contacted for a 2 jobs internally. One for which I had an interview today & another one pending interview.




    Now, I'm stuck:

    1. If I were to accept the first job, I would need to give my resignation a few days after my trip. However, if I do so, my overseas manager will wonder why I didn't mention it during my trip. Yet, the purpose of the trip is not to resign over there as it would be disrespectful to my manager who kindly invited me over there.

    2. If I were to accept the first job, they're going to initiate a background check. Thus, HR will be contacted whcih might perhaps hinder my chances at getting one of the 2 internal jobs (well, one of them, I don't care 100% about).


    How should I proceed?

    I want to accept the job I've already been offered and if something better comes along internally in the meantime, I may consider changing directions. Is this a bad idea?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Gold Member Rose Mosse's Avatar
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    You're overthinking it.
    Accept the position you want at the other auditing firm (accept the offer if that's what you want to do). Find out when you have to start. Your new employer should have asked you or should ask you at this point (confirm with you) when you're ready to start.

    Second, be honest with your mentor while giving your notice. It's customary to give much more notice than that if you are a higher paid executive or have more responsibilities. There's nothing else left to do but bow out graciously. It's your mentor not you who gets to choose whether she still wants the company to invest in a trip for you in the interim while they find someone else to replace you.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by RuedeRivoli
    Now, I'm stuck:

    1. If I were to accept the first job, I would need to give my resignation a few days after my trip. However, if I do so, my overseas manager will wonder why I didn't mention it during my trip. Yet, the purpose of the trip is not to resign over there as it would be disrespectful to my manager who kindly invited me over there.
    Naaah. It's not unusual for people to have many irons in the fire, so how would she know, exactly, when you received the offer?

    Originally Posted by RuedeRivoli
    2. If I were to accept the first job, they're going to initiate a background check. Thus, HR will be contacted whcih might perhaps hinder my chances at getting one of the 2 internal jobs (well, one of them, I don't care 100% about).
    Most HR departments handle such inquiries daily. Check the laws in your location. Where I live, employers are only able to ask your date of hire and your date of termination if applicable. In some places they can ask your salary, but the law changes on that frequently. They can't reveal anything about why they are asking, and your employer can't reveal any details about your employment.

    If anything, it can raise your status as someone competitors are interested in learning about. It doesn't say that you are hired by anyone.

    Originally Posted by RuedeRivoli
    How should I proceed?

    I want to accept the job I've already been offered and if something better comes along internally in the meantime, I may consider changing directions. Is this a bad idea?

    Thanks.
    No, it's a fine idea to have your current firm try to beat an offer. My sister got promoted that way after giving her notice. She learned that they had had plans for her and regretted not acting on them quickly enough. They pretzeled to keep her and made it worth her while to turn down the external offer.

    Fingers crossed for you, Ruede!

  4. #4
    Bronze Member Chelsea54's Avatar
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    Accept 1st job offer if will grow your credentials and bank account! Negotiate your start date. The new company will have appreciation that you donít want to abruptly leave your former.
    The HR call, will not jeopardize your 1st offer. And I agree with the other poster, that it could prompt them to offer you more in your current position or in the two internal roles youíre looking at.
    Your overseas mentoró sounds like this person supports you consistently. I would have a conversation with him/her saying youíve got a great opportunity, and thank this person for all theyíve done. Maybe youíll cross paths again in the future. Seems like this person might always be part of your professional network.

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  6. #5
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    Accept the first offer and tell them because of your trip you wonít be able to give notice until you get back to your office. Surely they have had situations where someone canít start immediately ? Congratulations!


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