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Thread: Torn apart between future careers

  1. #11
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    Originally Posted by Chocolate25
    My passion is helping others and making a difference. My education level is bachelors level. My innate talents are being patient.
    So get very specific about how you help others or want to - and how you want to make a difference. The other day my husband untangled impossible knots in my jacket strings that had wrapped themselves around our bedsheets, and 10 years ago he helped me by recognizing I was having a stroke and every day in his job he has to help people with a variety of situations (me too). If you asked him what his passion is he'd be a lot more specific than "helping others". And he's not looking for a job, neither am I but i was as of 3 years ago.

    Patience is great and depends what you are best at being patient at - handling the stress of a work deadline when your secretary is working verrrryyy slowly? A child having a meltdown? An older person acting out from dementia? A person ahead of you in line at the market while you're about to miss your bus and they want to chat up the cashier?

    Making a difference -what kind of difference? Do you want to help someone decorate their home and make it different? Do you want to change laws that exist? Do you want to potty train a 2 year old who is struggling with it? Find a way to help parents making difficult decisions about their children with special needs? Figure out how to improve a company's bottom line?

  2. #12
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    I will keep in mind as to what you are telling me. Right now i'm in the medical billing and coding field. As far as making a difference, I'd like to help a child overcome his or her difficulties. Before thinking of diving into this field, I'd like to do volunteering. As I volunteer and help out, I'd like to reflect on what I like or don't like. My friend and I had this talk. She mentioned that jobs would look at how you do you job vs how you are as a person. You are absolutely correct. Since I'm single and have the time and energy on my hands, I'd like to volunteer and learn about these fields. Did you enjoy working with special needs kids?

  3. #13
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    Originally Posted by Chocolate25
    I will keep in mind as to what you are telling me. Right now i'm in the medical billing and coding field. As far as making a difference, I'd like to help a child overcome his or her difficulties. Before thinking of diving into this field, I'd like to do volunteering. As I volunteer and help out, I'd like to reflect on what I like or don't like. My friend and I had this talk. She mentioned that jobs would look at how you do you job vs how you are as a person. You are absolutely correct. Since I'm single and have the time and energy on my hands, I'd like to volunteer and learn about these fields. Did you enjoy working with special needs kids?
    I enjoy working with and being around kids and try very hard not to think of a child as a "special needs child" or a "disabled child" - she is a child WITH a special need or WITH a disability. It does not define her - just like you're not a "directionless adult" -you're an adult with some current challenges in what path to take. Volunteering is a great idea -will give you a taste of it for sure! I like your friend's advice. I understand people use that as shorthand but as a person just starting out see them as individual people first is my suggestion. I mostly worked with typically developing children and was not certified in special ed when I had a teaching license. I volunteered for about 7 years weekly after I left teaching with children who lived in a homeless shelter - we read to them - I think in a number of cases we made a contribution. One of the volunteers ended up starting a girl scout troop at the shelter!

  4. #14
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    I would keep your medical billing job and take classes on the side to become qualified in something that involves more contact with who you want to work with - the elderly, the disabled, etc. and explore what you can make a career out of. It might be medical billing plus volunteering. it might be teaching. Who knows. But you need to make money. I get "wanting to make a difference" but there is no way to quantify that

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  6. #15
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    I think to help children with a disability listen to adults with that disability.

  7. #16
    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    I am late to the party as I needed a very long break. I work in the mental health field with adolescents. My upmost advice:

    It is very challenging, grueling work and it is not for everyone. If you are only looking at it for job stability, I guarantee you will end up leaving the field after or under a year. Your first year will be hell until youíve built that strong rapport with your clients and their families. The burnout is real if you are not prepared... which is why most mental health places always seem to be hiring. And unfortunately, college classes will not prepare you for it.

    To survive in the field you have to have the following:
    1. a real compassion or feel a true calling to work with individuals with disabilities.

    2. A clear understanding of how disabilities can impact a personís perception, reasoning, triggers, etc. It helps immensely if you have a disability.

    3. An unlimited amount of patience. Not just for your students/clients, but also for families who may not agree with you, an administration that may/may not support you and other servicing agencies. Remember: you might have to be that childís ONLY advocate and your feelings of loneliness do occur.


    What keeps me going are the clients and allowing my creativity to service them. Everyday is a new day and I am always doing different things with them. It keeps me always anticipating going into work! But I am the kind of person who cannot handle being in an office environment or stay on the same routine day in and day out- I am usually out in the field keeping data records.

    If you want to make good money and deal with far less stress, go into a medical tech field.

  8. #17
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    I agree with everything Snny wrote and wanted to emphasize "grueling" because you will find that the "wanting to make a difference" can struggle against "grueling" -bears some similarity to parenting in that regard. Reminding myself of my reasons for wanting to parent a child, remembering the blessing/winning the lottery aspects of it for me, personally don't always make the cut in long solo parenting stints especially when he is sick/getting sick (or is he/do I need to call in to work yet, etc) or trying my last nerve. And he is typically developing. I have worked with adults and children with disabilities but not full time and I know it is not for me no matter how much patience I can muster as a former teacher, or when I worked with kids in various capacities. So it's great you want to contribute in this way -we need more people like you!!! -and do not discount the grueling/grunt work aspect.

  9. #18

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    I am only 18 years old and just starting out in University. I am also the first in my immediate family to attend college so this is very special to me and also my family. In my country women are taking a much more prominent role in their education now going for jobs in Education, Nursing(like myself), and even Business. So a lot of women here are attending University now which is about time. I am going into Nursing because like you I have also been into helping others. I have always also been told to follow your passions and not to get stuck with what is going to be the most stable job. I have been told longevity in career equals a happy career. So that is really something to think about. You don't want to get stuck in a career you hate and it be too late to do something about it later on in life.

  10. #19
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    Congratulations to you!! I don't agree that if you don't choose early you're stuck. I know so many people who switched careers later in life including my friend who has 3 kids, is in her 30s, and switched to law school which she is now in the middle of. I switched earlier on -my mid 20s, my sister switched in her 40s. For certain careers like competitive sports or ballet maybe you do have to choose early I agree. Congratulation again.

  11. #20
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I enjoy working with and being around kids and try very hard not to think of a child as a "special needs child" or a "disabled child" - she is a child WITH a special need or WITH a disability. It does not define her - just like you're not a "directionless adult" -you're an adult with some current challenges in what path to take. Volunteering is a great idea -will give you a taste of it for sure! I like your friend's advice. I understand people use that as shorthand but as a person just starting out see them as individual people first is my suggestion. I mostly worked with typically developing children and was not certified in special ed when I had a teaching license. I volunteered for about 7 years weekly after I left teaching with children who lived in a homeless shelter - we read to them - I think in a number of cases we made a contribution. One of the volunteers ended up starting a girl scout troop at the shelter!
    Actually adult Autistics donít say they are a person WITH Autism. They use identity first language Autistic person, because their neurology DOES define them. You ARE your neurology and it affects every part of you . I belong to many adult Autistic groups and that is actually part of the rules . You MUST use identity first language and anything else is ableist.

    I donít know if it works that way for other disabilities.

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