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Thread: Looking to not only change jobs but move out of state. Advice?

  1. #11
    Gold Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    I thought I might want to move to another state, so I did as other posters have suggested; I spent 6 months researching, asking questions of people who lived where I wanted to live and made visits. I even went to a gas station there and quizzed the people who were buying gas. Do you like living here? What are some of the positives? The negatives? How is the local economy? Is housing difficult to find? Expensive or reasonable? How is the job market?

    I jumped without a parachute; I moved out here with no job lined up, basically no savings and a rented apartment that I got by lying on the rental application (I do NOT recommend or advocate doing this!). And it was right in the middle of the worst recession this country has seen in decades. But it all worked out. I found a job in 3 weeks and settled in.

    I absolutely love living here. The cost of living is so much better than where I moved from. And my family is only a few hours' drive or a short flight away. I do miss them, but I have the luxury of jumping in my car and driving out if I feel like it. I don't very often because I am having so much fun exploring my own city and area.

    It worked for me.

    And BTW, I moved to escape my self-destructive behavior after a breakup. I was doing stupid things like driving by his house, calling him then hanging up "accidentally", lurking around his family and friends and basically being an ass. If I moved hundreds of miles away I would have to stop. And I did, and ended up having a terrific life in my new city.

    Just some things to consider.
    But that's part of why you have to research so much beforehand and understand where you're going.

    My research showed me, and was confirmed by anybody i spoke to, that for VT, you do NOT want to show up without a job there. The state is the most rural state in our union and so jobs are hard to come by. IN FACT, changing jobs or promotions are hard to come by because it means somebody else has to retire or quit (which hardly happens in a more rural environment). So thru my research i knew i had to find a job and situation (aka pay) that i would be happy with and not be going into it thinking it was a launching pad i could change and enhance later.

    your situation worked out well. Then again, it probably was a place that even though it's recommended to have a job first, probably is a place that does have regular job opportunities to be had to be able to find one once you're there (3 weeks? must be so).

    So again. DO THE RESEARCH first and BASED on that research, you can make decisions on what you're comfortable with and have a reasonable idea of what you will find regardless of what you decide to do (go now, go after a job search, etc.)

  2. #12
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    Originally Posted by thisisrichey
    But that's part of why you have to research so much beforehand and understand where you're going.

    My research showed me, and was confirmed by anybody i spoke to, that for VT, you do NOT want to show up without a job there. The state is the most rural state in our union and so jobs are hard to come by. IN FACT, changing jobs or promotions are hard to come by because it means somebody else has to retire or quit (which hardly happens in a more rural environment). So thru my research i knew i had to find a job and situation (aka pay) that i would be happy with and not be going into it thinking it was a launching pad i could change and enhance later.

    your situation worked out well. Then again, it probably was a place that even though it's recommended to have a job first, probably is a place that does have regular job opportunities to be had to be able to find one once you're there (3 weeks? must be so).

    So again. DO THE RESEARCH first and BASED on that research, you can make decisions on what you're comfortable with and have a reasonable idea of what you will find regardless of what you decide to do (go now, go after a job search, etc.)
    Nope, the unemployment rate was in the high teens when I moved out here. But, I just had faith everything would work out. And if it didn't I had the option to move back home.

    No companies would hire me until I got there because they'd had too many instances where they'd hire someone who swore they were moving there, then no showed. I understand that!

    Now, of course, the economy is much better.

    Yes, I do agree with you, research is key. And not just asking a couple of people if they like living there. I'd recommend months of research before making any definite plans.

  3. #13
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    Thanks everyone for the responses and insight.

    I am planning a quick visit this weekend to look at apartments and get a feel for the city of Raleigh when it isn't summer time.

    If I were to leave without a job in place (which I am not inclined to do at this point) I would still put in my two weeks at my current job and try and leave on good terms. If down the line I realized I made a mistake I could move back to the MA area but wouldn't look at returning to my current company. It is horribly run and things are getting out of hand with lots of people jumping ship (the good/smart coworkers at least). I don't want to burn any bridges though, never a good thing to do. I have a healthy network in the MA area so if it came to it, I could get some help in finding some work if I needed to move back up north when the time came.

    My friends that moved South all went to Georgia, some for careers and one for law school. I would be moving to NC not knowing anyone in that area. I would also take a look at the Georgia area as well since that would have the advantage of knowing a few people there.

    I went to both last Summer and Raleigh left a much stronger impression on me. However, if the job pool is stronger in GA I would have to consider it.

    Thanks again for the tips/advice/insight into my current predicament.

  4. #14
    Gold Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    No companies would hire me until I got there because they'd had too many instances where they'd hire someone who swore they were moving there, then no showed. I understand that!
    Right! this is one of the major things that needs to be researched about any area! Most areas want you there first. However that is not true on the West Coast, and it wasn't true in VT as i found out.


    Originally Posted by boltnrun
    Yes, I do agree with you, research is key. And not just asking a couple of people if they like living there. I'd recommend months of research before making any definite plans.
    exactamundo! I recommend giving it a year of research and applying for jobs, looking at housing/rental costs, taking a couple visits etc - as a good foundation for planning on a relocation.

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  6. #15
    Gold Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    sounds like you're down to your final 2 and that's great. Now you can focus and really see the whole picture and which area comes thru for you more in the end.
    have fun with it! Congratulatoins! And best of luck with it!

    From what I've heard about both places - you're choosing between 2 good places!

  7. #16
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    Originally Posted by thisisrichey
    Right! this is one of the major things that needs to be researched about any area! Most areas want you there first. However that is not true on the West Coast, and it wasn't true in VT as i found out.



    exactamundo! I recommend giving it a year of research and applying for jobs, looking at housing/rental costs, taking a couple visits etc - as a good foundation for planning on a relocation.
    Not accurate, I am on the West Coast and the companies absolutely would not extend an offer or even schedule an interview unless and until I was a current resident of the state I moved to. But of course that was my experience and is not applicable in every single situation.


    OP, I would plan at least a couple more longer visits to get a feel for how it would be to actually LIVE and work there rather than being a visitor. I loved a particular city in the Pacific Northwest until I spent a week there, when I realized it was just about the same as the city I'd already left!

  8. #17
    Gold Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    that's weird... i'm in CA and people get jobs all the time and then relocate to the area. Perhraps its industry specific? and my industry you aren't required to be local (albeit it's a distinct advantage).

  9. #18
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    My wife is going on her fourth out-of-state interview in just over a month soon (she's got a good job here and is being pretty picky), so yeah, many professions do seriously consider applicants who aren't local. I, on the other hand, could get some solid leads, but no one's going to sign a contract with me unless I've already relocated. And others, unfortunately, might get their resumes shredded the moment it lists an out-of-state address. Again depends on the industry, career level, size of the applicant pool, etc.

    If OP's industry and career level allow for it, it's obviously ideal to have something in writing lined up. Otherwise, he'll have to do his best getting the ball rolling informally and building up a nest egg to make the leap.

  10. #19
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    I've thought of relocating again and the first thing I will have lined up is a MINIMUM of three months of expenses saved up. And I'm not including moving expenses, down payment on new apartment, paying to have my stuff loaded onto the moving truck, gas for the moving truck and for whoever I rope into driving my car to the new place and utility set up. So I would have all that saved plus the three months of expenses.

    And I would have an exit strategy. One of my friends made the HUGE mistake of signing a 17 month lease on an apartment in the city she relocated to because "the rent was cheaper". Well, she had to move back due to a medical emergency and only actually lived in the 17 month leased apartment for maybe 5 months. A family member is stuck paying the rent on that place when she isn't even living there. She will end up owing that family member THOUSANDS of dollars because she planned for the short term instead of thinking long term.

    So, as j.man said, have savings, start trying to make professional connections (contacting a recruiter in the new city is a great idea) and have an exit strategy in case things don't work out.

  11. #20
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    Originally Posted by j.man
    My wife is going on her fourth out-of-state interview in just over a month soon (she's got a good job here and is being pretty picky), so yeah, many professions do seriously consider applicants who aren't local. I, on the other hand, could get some solid leads, but no one's going to sign a contract with me unless I've already relocated. And others, unfortunately, might get their resumes shredded the moment it lists an out-of-state address. Again depends on the industry, career level, size of the applicant pool, etc.

    If OP's industry and career level allow for it, it's obviously ideal to have something in writing lined up. Otherwise, he'll have to do his best getting the ball rolling informally and building up a nest egg to make the leap.
    Definitely. If you are a better fit than local candidates, they will hire you. It won't matter where you come from. But you can't be just okay. Knowing that you *want* to be in the area helps. On one interview, they asked me if i had family or other ties there -- maybe that's not allowed now but being younger than 25, it was a fair ask. They just wanted to make sure i had some roots where i wasn't going to work for a week and decide i hate the area. you and your wife want to move near family on purpose so an employer knows that if the offer is made, your wife will follow through and she is not just interviewing to get interview experience.

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