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Thread: Future career thinking

  1. #1
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    Future career thinking

    Iíd like to know if there will be any demand for early childhood special education teachers. Iím looking into it. Iíd also like to know if there will be any job prospects relating to helping students who have adhd and dyslexia . Etc . Iím trying to seek more fulfilling things to do with my life .

  2. #2
    Forum Supporter ~Seraphim ~'s Avatar
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    It would depend I guess where you are . Here in Ontario becoming a teacher is a waste of time the market is saturated with teachers.

    What they need are special ed teachers who actually consult people with disabilities not just listen to drs and therapists.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    I have a masters in Special Ed. The need for special ed teachers or any mental health profession is exceedingly high... because of high turnover. I was given multiple job offers before graduating.

    Iím busy but will come back later

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    It depends where you are. I would look into professional organizations in your proposed fields that have networking groups or similar resources and see if you can talk to the career office of schools that have classes in these fields. Having been a teacher it is extremely fulfilling (I did not work with children with special needs but several friends do/have) and it is very low paying so you have to be prepared for that financially. I only taught for a few years and did a lot of evening and weekend work on lesson plans. My son's teachers (he is in a regular class) email over weekends and after hours and work very hard (so thankful for them).

    After leaving teaching I volunteered with children weekly for about 7 years and found it very fulfilling. So if the career is not for you volunteering might help you feel you are contributing in the way you wish to even if your day job is in a different field.

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  6. #5
    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    Iím back.

    Teaching CAN be be a rewarding and fulfilling job, yes. However, special ed teachers are often overworked and under supported (as itís been my experience). The downside of it is be prepared to give up your weekends for not just lesson planning but writing IEPs. I have written 20 page IEPs for 6 students... lots of writing (and elementary school SPED teachers spend more time writing IEPs... brand new ones because kids are typically diagnosed by the time theyíre in 3rd-4th grade). Batya mentioned about teachers contacting parents over the weekend, but I never did (and I seriously donít recommend it). About 90% of the time, you are doing paperwork, collecting multitude of data and sitting in meetings than actually teaching. Thatís the reason why many special education teachers burnout and quit.

    Iím not going to sugarcoat it - it is a stressful job and not everyone can do special ed. It takes a very special, patient person to stay in the field. Itís why I ended up taking addition classes and now work in a local mental health agency after interning at both a school district and a specialized Juve program for my masters.

    I recommend volunteering within community programs designated for children with disabilities or even substitute teach for a few months to get a feel if itís right for you before jumping in the field.

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    I think in this industry, there is a very high demand for specialized training. The problem is funding. With programs that incorporate students into the general population, teachers and support staff are needed. Special Ed kids are no longer sequestered away all the time. It depends on the specific dynamics and the need. I think with early childhood development, the staffing is higher, or so it seems to me, in my past experience. My children are grown now, so maybe things have changed. Like with any career choice and education, you should probably put some focus on a "backup plan," so with early learning, you could put some focus on older children or adolescence. This will only enrich your flexibility and enhance your job prospects, even if the goal is to ultimately move into early childhood. I don't think you can go wrong with your focus. The biggest issue is if school districts have the funding.

  8. #7
    Gold Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    i think the answer is yes - you can never had enough educators. In fact, educators is one of the skills that is welcomed worldwide if you ever wanted to get approved for a Visa to move anywhere and work. So teachers can work anywhere they want in the world and find a job and be welcomed.
    however, does "demand" = "pay" and "benefits"? I don't know.

    Definitely do your research with any targeted locations you are thinking might be intersting to you to see if they have a specific need for what you want to do (I am sure there will be no problem if it's special needs you're looking for).

    Best wishes!

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    Originally Posted by thisisrichey
    i think the answer is yes - you can never had enough educators. In fact, educators is one of the skills that is welcomed worldwide if you ever wanted to get approved for a Visa to move anywhere and work. So teachers can work anywhere they want in the world and find a job and be welcomed.
    however, does "demand" = "pay" and "benefits"? I don't know.

    Definitely do your research with any targeted locations you are thinking might be intersting to you to see if they have a specific need for what you want to do (I am sure there will be no problem if it's special needs you're looking for).

    Best wishes!
    Yes, especially if the person is geographically flexible and flexible as to subject and student body. Certainly educators of students with special needs typically are in high demand everywhere.

  10. #9
    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    you can never had enough educators.
    This part is not true. I graduated with a B.A. in English teaching in 2008 and did not become a full-time teacher until 2011 because of the job market for teaching was nearly non-existent. School systems were cutting teachers for a few years due to the economy. That first teaching job I took was an inner city alternative school for kids who were expelled from public schools because nobody else wanted to work in that kind of environment. I faced physically assault, harassment, and was often threatened. I had a student on my first day of teaching threatened to bring a gun to school and "shoot up the classroom." That kid got arrested, I stayed and finished out the school year, but never again. Transferred out.

    Humanity teachers (English, history, art, PE) are the most expendable teaching careers where it's hard to get a job in. One year I moved a few states away from home to take a job, which did not work out. I had to go back to school for a master's in Special Education and get dual certified because I couldn't get hired with just an English teaching degree/cert.

    In fact, educators is one of the skills that is welcomed worldwide
    This is also not entirely true. If you want to teach in first world countries in Europe, you need a master's, teaching experience, and the ability to speak the country's language. LOL, How's your Polish? Danish? German? Norwegian? I tried. Sure, you can get a teaching job in Asia but you may not be sent to a place that is stable. I had a contract offer from a school in Japan... only for the school to be wiped out by a tsunami a week before my initial departure date (and I later got engaged around the same time as well).


    The top hiring subjects for teaching - in the US - are Special Education (high turnover), Math (math people make more money doing other things besides teaching), and ESL/ESOL/ELL (thanks to immigration). If the OP wants to do SPED, she will have better luck finding a teaching job there. But please, research the ins and outs of the job and see if it's right for you. SPED teachers are the real superheros of the field because of the amount of work they take on. They do way more than regular ed teachers.
    Last edited by Snny; 12-22-2018 at 08:07 AM.

  11. #10
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    To obtain any kind of degree, research is a key skill. So what kinds of research are you doing on the field, related careers and the potential for opportunities in your location?

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