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Thread: Getting tired of the travel

  1. #11
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by compwhiz345
    Update: So, my boss went on maternity leave and left me with her responsibilities in the interim, and of course at the worst possible time. I've had less time then ever to focus on any one thing to fully finish and I am a multitasker. We also just hired a new person which is completely new, so I'm taking time to train him so the rest of the team isn't taking away from the more important tasks. This role should have shifted to the more senior person, but they didn't think the person was up to the challenge based of their performance. I obviously didn't ask for this to happen, but I also didn't reject the opportunity to show my learned skills either for the next 3 months. So, clearly I'm more stuck at the moment than I was before.

    So I'm about a month or so in now and I'm feeling very depressed that I'm failing, because I am failing. Every aspect of my job has become atleast 30-40% harder with communication, keeping deadlines, prioritizing and just wanting to get up and go to work. I was given some work mobility to offset the travel, but now I'm doing this and I'm doing the long drive. My mind is already stressed by the time arrive.

    I'm trying hard not to not to show weakness or complain and stay professional at work. However, my mind is so overwhelmed with doubt, forgetfulness and anixety, that I'm mentally burntout. I have plenty of paid days to take, but how can I cut the cord and walk away?
    Can you find a B&B or other arrangement to sleep closer to work during the week? Also plan vacation time and use it to apply at agencies closer to home. If anything shakes out of that, you'll have something to leave for.

  2. #12
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    Originally Posted by catfeeder
    Can you find a B&B or other arrangement to sleep closer to work during the week? Also plan vacation time and use it to apply at agencies closer to home. If anything shakes out of that, you'll have something to leave for.
    I've tried doing the hotels, sometimes twice a week, but that adds up financially. I'm also being told that a promotion is coming soon, which makes me anxious because I'm not sure I want that and then have to be even more devoted to the job and do additional responsibilities. I've been reading up on some articles recently for tips and examples on what to do and consider. I read that most people make the biggest mistake of getting sucked into something called a "Promotion Trap" where management promotes strong performers based on past performance and uses that to determine potential accomplishments in the future as managers, for company growth, etc. However, they end up turning top performers (like me) into mediocre managers. I would prefer to avoid that happening in my career, and I can kind of already see that happening right now for myself, which I don't want.

    So, if I'm job searching, and I get offered a promotion, how can I knowingly accept a promotion that I don't want, to keep my job for money and not raise any red flags until I find something else? Wouldn't that be unprofessional?

  3. #13
    Platinum Member catfeeder's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by compwhiz345
    I read that most people make the biggest mistake of getting sucked into something called a "Promotion Trap" where management promotes strong performers based on past performance and uses that to determine potential accomplishments in the future as managers, for company growth, etc. However, they end up turning top performers (like me) into mediocre managers.
    You can just say this ^^^. Or, I already like my job the way it is, but thank you for considering me. Whether that raises flags or not is irrelevant. Companies can assume that most top performers already DO have other options, so the smart ones will use care not to abuse that person. More tone deaf companies abuse and lose people, and that's their problem, not yours.

    Don't try to control what is not yours to control. If the company figures out that you're seeking other work, they can either try to incentivize you to stay, or not. Otherwise, they would need to build a case for dismissing you before you leave, and that's usually harder to do than to simply treat your relationship as the temporary one that it is.

  4. #14
    Gold Member Cherylyn's Avatar
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    No matter what you do, never jump ship until you've secured your next, new job first and foremost. Never be left in limbo such as unemployment because it is extremely difficult to find a job despite what people say. Anybody who has job security and a steady paycheck are awfully fortunate and lucky.

    Even though you despise your commute, be grateful for your job and should a promotion be forthcoming, then pounce on it and accept so it can tide you over should you embark on your new job hunt. Be shrewd and prudent. Be extremely conservative and wise because you never want to put yourself in a financial dilemma.

    Never presume you'll beat out your competition for a job or jobs because the odds are not in your favor. Remain employed, search for a new job, secure the next job and THEN quit your current job. That's the way to to do it.

    Never quit your job unless you have an overlap and secure the next job because that would be plain foolhardy. Think about your survival first.

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  6. #15
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    Originally Posted by Cherylyn
    No matter what you do, never jump ship until you've secured your next, new job first and foremost. Never be left in limbo such as unemployment because it is extremely difficult to find a job despite what people say. Anybody who has job security and a steady paycheck are awfully fortunate and lucky.

    Even though you despise your commute, be grateful for your job and should a promotion be forthcoming, then pounce on it and accept so it can tide you over should you embark on your new job hunt. Be shrewd and prudent. Be extremely conservative and wise because you never want to put yourself in a financial dilemma.

    Never presume you'll beat out your competition for a job or jobs because the odds are not in your favor. Remain employed, search for a new job, secure the next job and THEN quit your current job. That's the way to to do it.

    Never quit your job unless you have an overlap and secure the next job because that would be plain foolhardy. Think about your survival first.
    I am absolutely grateful that I have a job that pays decent, but I also know that this is also a employee's job economy now too where there are quite a few jobs that are going unfilled. So, I know my current employer is trying to retain me because they see my work ethic trying to get things done, but I'm mentally and physically BURNT OUT. I shouldn't feel like that at a job right now. Also, between the drive and the extra job responsibilities, I know I dont want this type of work life balance going the way as it is, it's no way to live your life. I'm trying to pull back and establishing a work-life balance. But, I'm told that my employer is going to be promoting me from hourly to salaried a want to schedule a review by next week, so now my work-life balance will probably go out the window because now I'll be relied on WAY more to pick up the slack of the team and work longer hours, which I DO NOT want to do. I'm just feeling like everything's moving so quickly and I'm having trouble keeping track of what's changing that how this is going to affect my career at this company going forward and what my say is, because it seems like they're just piling on more responsibilities because nobody else is there to do it or they simply don't have the persons to do it anymore.

    Do you think it's wrong to accept promotion for short time, while looking for another job and then give your notice?

    I'm trying to look at this from the best option for myself and travel, because I've been too tired to do job hunting lately which has led me to this predicament. I don't want to accept the promotion and then a couple of months later give a notice if I go d a job I like better and then burn a reference. I'm afraid it would look bad. I'm feeling like I'm in a catch 22 now.

  7. #16
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    I commute a couple of hours each way in Los Angeles. it is worth it to me because the career and pay is so much better then out in the sticks. However, I have several ways to make it less painful.

    I take public transport a lot: train, bus, etc.
    When I drive, I do errands, stop to see friends. I even do a bit of sightseeing. There is always somewhere interesting to go to. Who says I have to do the slingshot ride down the crowded freeway?
    Satellite radio helps too. I listen to podcasts, old time radio classics, a zillion music genres.

    Have you considered hat maybe it is not really the commute that is getting to you, but the job itself?

    BTW, I've moved long distance for jobs four times. Only once was it a mistake. And every time it was for a significant bump in pay.

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