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Thread: 2 1/2 year old stopped speaking

  1. #1
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    2 1/2 year old stopped speaking

    So Im wondering if someone has experience or advice on this.

    Short background

    My son is 2 1/2 years old. He did start speaking when he was about 1 old but the basics, mama, dada, fell, and so on. Then he stopped and about a year ago he went to have his ears checked and they where both blocked and he had to have "pipes" inserted into them. (sorry English is a second language).

    But since then he dosent talk, he will make a bunch of sounds like brrrr for cars, ugh for surprising and other more sounds but no words.

    We are working with the kindergarten they have a feeling he is just "downloading" and will talk when ready, he is going back to check his ears and to see a therapist.

    He is really strong and they tested him this summer like a ability test. He scored on a three year old level on everything from understanding, movement, spacial awareness and more. But nothing on speech (ofc)

    He seems to be smart as well he understands if I say ok diaper change or time to go to sleep. He will jump up and run to his bed or changing station. If I say we are going out he will get his clothes and we help him get dressed. We also tested him with his Paw partol teddy bears. He will line them up and point and stare at us until we say the name of the dog. But we tried to say the wrong name and he just looked backed at the dog he was pointing at and grunted. Then pointed "harder" and grunts.

    He is loving, loves to play fight, he is a prankster he will tease us and so on. He will pretend to fall a sleep and then when we walk out he will laugh and stand up throw the pillow at us. He will even pretend to snore.
    One time he was pulling a fischer price oven on top of him pretend to be stuck and then push it back up. After about 8 times I said "no stop doing that" he looked at me and the oven. Then pulled it down on him. Looked at me for "help" I said "stop it" with a grin and he then pretended to be unable to push it off him. Then looked at me started laughing and pushed it back up.

    So Im not really worried that he is autistic or something major wrong. But it is concerning. What would you recommend to do or help him start speaking? Have you experienced a similar thing?

    Thank you so much

  2. #2
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    I would look at the books Play to Talk and Let's Talk Together (I am sorry, those are in English and I'm not sure if they are translated)

    I would have him evaluated by a developmental pediatrician -a pediatrician who specializes in developmental delays. It does sound like an audiological issue above all else given all you wrote but I am not a doctor or in the health professions -just have indirect experience with this sort of thing. I am a big fan of the evaluations rather than worrying. I am encouraged by the kindergarten teacher's assessment since it sounds like he is social and interactive -even moreso than the typical 2 year old. And please enjoy him and his pranks and everything -he sounds adorable! (I have a son too -he is 9).

  3. #3
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    Yeah like I said we are not that worried. I think his independent streak is also "slowing" it down. He will play with other children. But he will get tired off it and go off on his own. He also wants to do things on his own. He never asks for the tv he finds the remote and knows how to turn on and then just starts pressing buttons. haha one other funny story this summer. Little scary as well hehe. He wanted an orange, we were finishing some stuff and said "wait then we will help you." only to find him couple of min later with an orange and a knife stuck in it. So he found a chair put it next to the draws where we keep the forks, knifes and so on. Found a knife, then climbed up and got an orange. Then sad on the floor and stapped it.

    We walked in like "" and ran over grabbed him up and the orange started saying like "no no" and he just got annoyed and pointed at the orange and grunted in like a "what the F I just wanted an orange." haha

  4. #4
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    So I would start to child proof more today. Make sure your TV is fastened to the wall (we bought special fasteners) as well as the dressers and bookshelves (or fastened to whatever the tv is mounted on, I meant). I put all knives, matches, laundry detergent, etc. up high. I have many stories of kids who got into emergency situations because of carelessness or a lack of child proofing.

    Even if it's something minor early intervention is key.

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  6. #5
    Platinum Member RainyCoast's Avatar
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    I would get a specialist. From what you describe he is indeed clever, sociable, cheerful, and his hearing is good. I would ask to be referred to a specialist who could examine why he hasn't been able to reproduce the words he can hear and understand since his procedure. Perhaps the doctor who followed up on him after the procedure could point you in the right direction.

  7. #6
    Bronze Member BecxyRex's Avatar
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    Is it possible that due to his hearing issues a while ago he's just simply "catching up"? What he didn't hear back then he's now hearing clearer and is just a bit delayed or at a younger kid's level due to that? Unless I misunderstood the OP, but I'd just give him a little more time. I'm sure he catches up soon and he does seem to understand a lot already. My daughter was the same, understood a ton of words way before she actually spoke them.

  8. #7
    Gold Member maew's Avatar
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    Do get him assessed if you are at all concerned... ask your pediatrician to recommend a speech therapist or other specialist that can help you understand what's going on.

    It may comfort you to know that my friend had similar concerns with her boy... he spoke very little between the age of 2-3, and only just started speaking full sentences at 3. They had a number of tests and assessments done with no visible or apparent issues so they were told he would grow out of it eventually. He is now almost 5 and is very articulate at expressing himself.

    It's really good that you are dealing with this now, and moving forward with getting him assessed by various specialists will help rule things out and help you feel more in control of things.

  9. #8
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    My sons speech was delayed a bit because he had fluid in his ears. Once he could hear and had speech therapy he caught up. My son is Autistic but his speech delay was due to hearing.

  10. #9
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    Seek a specialist. We are neither audiologists, speech therapy experts, nor behavioral specialists.

    We are just people on a message board.

    Please seek proper care soon. Very best to you.

  11. #10
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    Please take your son to a developmental pediatrician. They really look at the WHOLE child, at all aspects of their lives, and figure things out. Better to get a close look now, while he is only two, than to wait as if there is a problem they can take care of it early. I have a good friend who is a neurodevelopmental ped and I helped him open his office -- the things he figured out were truly amazing.

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