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Thread: 2 1/2 year old stopped speaking

  1. #11
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    If your son wants something, make him say the word for it. Ask him about 5 times before giving in. You want him communicating with words as much as possible.

  2. #12
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    My 1st son, speaking in sentences by 1, and speaking in 7 word sentences by two. So when my second son, probably didn't even say mommy until maybe, maybe 18 months??, I thought something was wrong. I mean, he picked up more and more words over time, and his lexicon was massive. At 2.5, he still wasn't speaking no where like his brother, but at 34 months, according to his teacher, the kid is considered beyond the brightest of his class of 18 kids, and his vocabulary is so advanced, he surprises me with 5 syllable words, but I can only understand 50% of the time, even though he's having full on conversations with me and others. He has an older brother that would talk over him all up to that point, and now he's pissed when I don't ask him questions about his day like I do with my eldest.

    Things you can rest easy on - he's not frustrated, his lexicon to understand, name recognition of objects, things, himself, and vocabulary are really great...sometimes kids just don't talk much at 2.5 years. If all their needs are being met, talking is not a much needed jam.

    Things to look out for with being on the spectrum: walks on tippy toes regularly. Zero eye contact. Constant need to create patterns, line toys cars up, and if not, they may have a breakdown or fit. Or just really frustrated with no being able to communicate with words.

    If you want to get a developmental check-up, make an appt now, because it can take you 6 to 8 months in the US to get one. I was lucky since the practice we go to has two of them. Had to get my eldest checked for ADHD.
    Last edited by tattoobunnie; 11-28-2018 at 02:56 PM.

  3. #13
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    I do not agree with him having to use the right word. Using a word that he uses for that item is his way of commincating - I think the goal is communication whether or not its the correct word. And be careful not to have him associate talking to get basic needs met - it shouldnt be a form of discipline especially if he lacks the ability right now. And if youre going to give in after five times or ten then he will just learn to wait that long until you give in. Also lots of positive reinforcement when he communicates in a verbal way.
    Last edited by Batya33; 11-28-2018 at 02:44 PM. Reason: Addition

  4. #14
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    Google "Speech Therapy" and go from there. There are no professionals on the subject here (that I'm aware of) so please do the responsible thing and start by speaking to your family doctor about your concerns and getting a referral to the appropriate professional(s).

    Good luck, most likely he's just a delayed speaker and he will catch up soon enough but do make sure that is all that it is because the earlier anything that may be wrong is caught, it usually means the better the outcome.

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  6. #15
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    I agree that if he couldn't hear for a good long time - that you have to expect his speech might be delayed by that long or a little more. If he is communicative in every way except speech, i agree taking him to a speech therapist and explaining that he couldn't hear for awhile would be helpful -- people are so quick to label someone with this syndrome or that and a speech therapist could work with him and determine what's going on. I have a niece who is his age and is just starting to talk. The problem there is that everyone waited on her hand and foot - she is the only grandchild on one side. She gestures and people run and fulfill every perceived need so she has no reason to talk any further. make sure you are creating opportunities where he needs to use words - or introduce words as if you would a baby by pointing to things and teaching.

  7. #16
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    If this is not addressed, he could fall socially behind and he may already be since he is not speaking on the level of kids he is playing with and that may be why he is frustrated/there is a limit to how long he plays because they do not understand him

  8. #17
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    Originally Posted by abitbroken
    I agree that if he couldn't hear for a good long time - that you have to expect his speech might be delayed by that long or a little more. If he is communicative in every way except speech, i agree taking him to a speech therapist and explaining that he couldn't hear for awhile would be helpful -- people are so quick to label someone with this syndrome or that and a speech therapist could work with him and determine what's going on. I have a niece who is his age and is just starting to talk. The problem there is that everyone waited on her hand and foot - she is the only grandchild on one side. She gestures and people run and fulfill every perceived need so she has no reason to talk any further. make sure you are creating opportunities where he needs to use words - or introduce words as if you would a baby by pointing to things and teaching.
    I agree, the not being able to hear is a significant issue. In my son it created a disability, phonological learning disability. Have this addressed by speech therapist . Phonological learning disability can be improved and corrected but not after teenage years . By the time we found out my son had this it was too late to correct it .
    [Register to see the link]

    Even though my son speaks impeccably he has great difficulty learning to spell and to create grammatically correct sentences due to the fact that he could not hear as a toddler .

  9. #18
    Bronze Member thisisrichey's Avatar
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    Great feedback from folks thus far - i learned a lot.
    It sounds very logical to me that the loss or struggle with hearing early on would delay development of speech. Makes total sense.

    The only other thing that popped into my head (about him having a fascination of "help me mommy" play), as well as the speech thing potentially, is if he may be imitating anything he's being exposed to (most likely a tv show or movie) that seems to get a positive reaction from the peopel around him. let's just say .... for some reason at a social gathering of family a Charlie Chaplin youtube video was playing or a silent humorous video was playing and had some harmless "help me" accident kind of humor going on - and that video had no dialog in it. Is there anytign like that going on that he's been exposed to that maybe he's just imitating b/c his observations from reactions are that "that's a good thing and makes my family and parents happy.." ?

    i definitely think the speech thing (the primary concern here) - i think there's definitely something to the "loss of hearing" idea. So as some others said, definitely be extremely encouraging and attentive and look happy whenever he starts to utter things (as opposed to pointing) and see if it drws out more attempts to make sounds.

    In the end.. this is definitely a question for professionals studied in the field moreso than a forum of random strangers. Definitely seek opinions of professional and eve multiple ones to see what the common ground feedback is.

    Good luck. I think it's going to be okay. Nothign seemingly too concerning here.

  10. #19
    Platinum Member Snny's Avatar
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    Seek a specialist. We are neither audiologists, speech therapy experts, nor behavioral specialists.

    We are just people on a message board.
    I am actually one of the three positions mentioned. However it would be very unethical for me to make any evaluations based on informal information over the internet. The OP does need to see a perofessional face-to-face.

  11. #20
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    Originally Posted by Snny
    I am actually one of the three positions mentioned. However it would be very unethical for me to make any evaluations based on informal information over the internet. The OP does need to see a perofessional face-to-face.
    Great response! This thread has gotten, quite frankly, ridiculous with all the "tips & tricks".

    This is not a typical "he didn't call me back" post.

    This is a 2 1/2 year old with quite possibly serious issues.

    Go to a licensed professional. Take it from Snny, as she is one.
    Last edited by LHGirl; 11-28-2018 at 08:20 PM.

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