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Thread: Manuka Honey?

  1. #1
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Manuka Honey?

    Hi Amazing Pet Owners!

    Just wondering what everyone's thoughts are for using Manuka Honey on small wounds on cats and dogs?

    I did a veterinary related degree and spent a lot of time with work experience in practice. I have seen many vets push medicines for "money" instead or using alternative natural treatments.

    I know some vets and rescue centers use it as a valid treatment but very rare to find those that advise this.

    I am not crazy and would never ignore going to the vet for something serious.

    I read an interesting article about a women who was prosecuted for using it on her cat and banned for having pets for a year! She literally ignored her cat's condition which lead to amputation of his leg and subsequently had to be put down which was sad. All this could of been avoided if she seeked medical care for him.

    So it's given some negative light to using it as manuka honey as a treatment.

    Let me know if you have used it and how your pet has got on with it.

  2. #2
    Platinum Member maew's Avatar
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    I've never done it or heard of anyone doing it... I don't recommend it for cats though as they would just end up licking it off and don't tolerate or digest it well. And couldn't imagine the sticky mess it would make in their fur, especially my on my RagDoll lol

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    Platinum Member DancingFool's Avatar
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    Well the research on this is only regarding people as far as I know. You shouldn't actually put it directly on the wound, but rather via bandage.

    As for animals like dogs and cats, it's actually risky to use because honey may be toxic to them if they ingest it. Some may be more tolerant than others to it, but if they lick it off or chew through the bandage, you can have a whole different problem on your hands.

    When it comes to wound care, as much as I like alternative medicines, quite frankly there are some very simple good, long time established ointments that work like a charm and I see zero reason to mess with honey. Most are also available at your local feed store, so not expensive to buy and you don't need a vet to "push" prescription strength stuff for minor things. That said, if your animal is injured enough to require veterinary care, then trust your vet to provide you what you actually need to ensure your pet's health. Most vets I know don't actually "push" unnecessary meds on your critter. If you believe that yours is doing so, change your vet.

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    I've never once heard it heal wounds. But I got some recently after my doctor told me to get it. I took it recently for a cold that I was getting that normally last a week or so. The next day, no sign of the cold. Very weird. Took it with my tea. Doesn't hurt to check it out for a sore throat or cold.

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    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Jellybean9
    I have seen many vets push medicines for "money" instead or using alternative natural treatments.
    What, do you think your veterinarian is getting a commission for every "unnatural" medication they provide? They're not administering medication to make a buck. They're doing it because they went to school 8 years and, even for veterinarians, likely completed a 3+ year residency, and keep up with the published literature in order to best understand what evidence-based medication is appropriate. In fact, pharma's been historically at odds with veterinarian practices around medications precisely because they're not conducive to a nice profit margin like human medicine's have historically been (even then, between anti-kickback and Stark laws, your physician likely isn't making a dime off the prescription they write you). Besides, if they really were in it to make a buck without regard to Mittens' health, why not just buy a jar of honey or whatever other "natural" medicine for whichever owners who insist on it?

    I know some vets and rescue centers use it as a valid treatment but very rare to find those that advise this.
    I'd probably stick to the consensus among the professionals, then.

    There are numerous topical and relatively non-intrusive treatments out there which are scientifically supported where I don't think it's worth p*ssing off your cat sticking its fur with honey even if there were an empirical benefit.

    Honestly, with all the jackassery going on with folks who are oblivious to the fact our pets' physiology are often astronomically different than our own (not saying you're among them), I think it's socially irresponsible for any one of us to suggest treating them on your own even if some among us might be competent to some minor degree or if some ideas would most likely, at worst, be relatively benign. If it's superficial enough not to require a vet, then there's a good chance you're doing more harm than good messing with it. If it's serious enough to need something done, then you should be taking your pet in.
    Last edited by j.man; 11-21-2018 at 04:22 PM.

  7. #6
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Found it fasinating after reading the article about a women being prosecuted by the RSPCA for using the honey. With the article making it sound like it's bad to use. When in fact it's her actions of not seeking veterinary care was the issue and not the honey itself. As the RSPCA use manuka honey in their practices.

    It does work wonders to heal wounds. Was advised so for myself after surgery by the doctor.

    I've seen it also used in veterinary practice. Espicially veterinary osteopeadic surgery on open wounds while bandaged. Accelerated healing greatly due to its antibacterial properties.

    Was curious what everyones elses thoughts were.

    I'm very fortunate to have a great veterinary that doesn't push for unnecessary treatment. Next visit I'll question him about manuka honey in general. He is very holistic in his approach but remains a remarkable vet.

    Unfortunately a lot of veterinary practices do cut corners when it comes to holding back on finances or making money.

    Awful story about one veterinary who bought incredibly cheap cannulas. Saved one third instead of buying the decent ones. Anyway he is fitting the cannual for the euthanasia to be adminstrated. As they were not high quality he was unable to insert it into the vein. It took over 5 attempts! All this while the owners are there clearly distressed. Could have all been avoided if he bought the more expensive ones. It took ages to put the dog to sleep. Distressing for the owners and the dog.

    The client is still charged the same even if he was using the correct cannuals. So they are essentially making money as a practice.

    It wasn't even the fact he was a newly qualified vet. He had been in practice for over 35 years.

    Sadly it is a business and like most businesses they will do the best to increase their profits.

    I have even seen them use cheaper alternatives in pain relief after surgery on animals. Again clinets charged the same! All very regulated practices too.


    So that's why when they push for the high steroid creams and ointments. Makes me wonder are the alternatives really that bad?

    As honey is not toxic to animals. May cause an upset stomach if eaten in excess but the same would happen to us too.

    Was an interesting find to be fair.

  8. #7
    Platinum Member j.man's Avatar
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    What "wonders?" Do you have an AJVR publication (or Aussie equivalent) that gives credit to these wonders of honey treating house pets?

    You can wonder all you want. Fact is animal medicine should be taken as seriously as human medicine-- or at least as close to it as it reasonably can be. The wonderings and anecdotes of one woman or even the scientifically unsupported opinion of a flower child holistic veterinarian should not frame medical treatment protocols. If any one of us were to go in with a gash only for the doctor to pull out a jar of honey, I pray to the God I don't even believe in that he gets smacked so hard his shoes and stethoscope fall right off.

    I think it's a huge slap in the face to veterinarians who devote upwards of 12 years of their lives being educated and trained for what's typically a pretty meager salary compared to most other fields of similar educational / training requirements and professional responsibilities to apathetically attribute their work to "sadly" being purposed for a profit. I'm not sure what vets you're seeing rolling up to the clinic in a Rolls-Royce, but your standard GP clinic or animal hospital isn't operating at nearly the scale of their human counterparts. They aren't being equivalently compensated for comparable human procedures and operations, nor do they have the economy of scale with the multi-trillion dollar medical equipment and pharmaceutical industry to take advantage of. Unless you'd like to contradict yourself and hope they sell themselves to whom you perceive to be the devil, these clinics are and likely for the foreseeable future will be hoping to somehow simply stay in the black. Fact is you have no idea why they're skimping $0.25 per cannula, but I can near guarantee the guy wasn't sticking an animal six times just so he could see some dollar signs.

    I don't know what degree you have, if you're a vet tech, whatever. But it's sounding like it's probably best you stay in your lane. There's a certain level of nuance that comes with effective administration which probably doesn't lend itself to folks who consider pouring honey on cats and dogs without supportive research and literature to be a satisfactory practice in lieu of established medicine.

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    I agree with Jman and also believe that you find a doctor you feel you can trust - and if you believe your doctor is in it for profit and not your best interest or your pet's/child's/loved one then you are seeing the wrong doctor. On an analogous note I've seen so many on my facebook mom groups post all the conspiracy theories about flu shots while people -including children -are already dying this year from flu complications. Or almost dying. I'm not saying it's "right" to get vaccinated -my point is that this fear-mongering and push for everything holistic because of big-bad-medicine is too far to the other extreme (no I am not in any medical field at all). Sure, there are alternatives- honey, hot tea, and I've heard elderberry oil is good for certain ailments (never tried it) - and certainly all the natural prevention -staying hydrated, trying to eat cleanly, etc. But to paint doctors with such a broad negative brush such that you'd consider honey for something like wound care (unless your trained vet recommended it) - I just think that's doing disservice to the care of an animal.

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    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Hi J.man,

    There is supportive scientific articles out there based on Manuka honey's remarkable properties. For both human and veterinary medicine. They can easily be found on any rearch journal website.

    It prevents the use of antibiotic topical treatments as we all know is widely used and increasing bacterial resistance.

    For the record I am not saying I go around and smear honey over my pets in hope it makes them feel better from the "magic" of honey. I'm not a fool and would always seek profesional medical care when it comes to my pets. As I would so the same for myself or any family member. As you are right veterinary medicine should be treated the same as human medicine.

    That said medical grade honey is sold in veterinary practices! Same as what you would find in your local pharamacy just without the hyped up prices from a vet practice.

    I'm not saying go to your local green grocers and pick up some honey and go play vet. But if it's the same being sold for use in practice. Then why not use it? It is not as widely known as your conventional medical oinments.

    Happens to be cheaper than your steriod based and antibiotic based oinments. Let's face it steriod creams can be so damaging to skin.

    Years ago our German Shepherd as a puppy experienced eczema. The vet who was not a holistic vet suggested instead or the harsh chemicals in steroid creams that we should go to the pharmacy and get nappy rash cream for his eczema. We didn't do it because it was cheaper - we went as we was advised by a trained veterinarian. Guess what it treated his eczema amazingly! Happened to be a fraction of the price too.

    You do get decent vets who are litterally in it for the aminals. Like the women we met all those years ago. But you also get vets who do think of the dollar signs sadly.

    Now being a pet owner I take full financial responsibility for my pets. It's part of the parcel. I would never begrudge treatment for them on the grounds of money. That said if there is a more natural alernative then why not explore it? Heck even if it costa more who cares if it has a better overall outcome for your pets health.

    The vet I had mentioned regarding the cannulas. I had spoke with the practice nurse and even she said he has been cutting corners for years now and the care he is offering to animals has greatly decreased on these grounds. He owned the practice so his budget cuts directly lined his pockets. So yes I do believe he was doing it for the "dollar signs".

    GP surgeries are regulated more than veterinary practices. Meaning veterinary practice owners can get away with this and more! If you ever get an itemized bill from your vet after an operation, a lot of the times a lot of those items have never been used but you are stilled charged for!

    I am not saying all veterinary practices operate this way. But I have some across some that have. Which is why it is so important to be with a vet you can genuinely trust. Like I have and many others have fortunately.

    I was merely asking for opinions of using Manuka honey. I was not disregarding the veterinary profession and saying I'll go against veterinary advice for my own pets.

    No, I am not a vet tech. I never said my degree would equipt me for adminstrating or playing "vet". It has given me a basic understanding of veterinary reseach. So I will stay in my "lane" as I've never gone against medical advise from professionals for my own pets. Or even advised others of alternatives got their own pets.

    I was asking for people's personal experience with it. And curious if it was more widely known as a treatment.

    That said I have has been involved in veterinary related research especially veterinary pharamacolgy.

    I know the vast difference from humans to other species. So know that I can't overlap research from human medicine directly to animals.

    I did my masters under the vice principal of my veterinary school. I was talking to him about the discovery of a very effective drug for hypertension. He was explaining that despite it being an overall better drug than the mainstream drug on offer. He said it wouldn't get very far in practice as it's very expensive for practice's to use. So that said vets tend to not be adminstrating the "best" medication at times due to expense. Which is very similar to human medicine.

    So them not offering something natural doesn't mean it's not good. As sometimes things on their shelves aren't exactly the best medication on offer either.

    Just keep that all in mind.

  11. #10
    Silver Member Jellybean9's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Batya33
    I agree with Jman and also believe that you find a doctor you feel you can trust - and if you believe your doctor is in it for profit and not your best interest or your pet's/child's/loved one then you are seeing the wrong doctor. On an analogous note I've seen so many on my facebook mom groups post all the conspiracy theories about flu shots while people -including children -are already dying this year from flu complications. Or almost dying. I'm not saying it's "right" to get vaccinated -my point is that this fear-mongering and push for everything holistic because of big-bad-medicine is too far to the other extreme (no I am not in any medical field at all). Sure, there are alternatives- honey, hot tea, and I've heard elderberry oil is good for certain ailments (never tried it) - and certainly all the natural prevention -staying hydrated, trying to eat cleanly, etc. But to paint doctors with such a broad negative brush such that you'd consider honey for something like wound care (unless your trained vet recommended it) - I just think that's doing disservice to the care of an animal.
    Completely agree when it comes to vaccines.

    Some awful stories of how parents have lost children for not vaccinating against measles, mumps and rubella.

    In the 90's the MMR vaccine had a lot of negative press. A lot of parents opting against it and some still do to this say.

    It's sad that literally lives have been lost for opting against vaccination.

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